John Pizzarelli – John Pizzarelli meets The Beatles (1998)

FrontCover1Beatles fans love to explain that the key to the successful partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney was their contrasting songwriting personalities — Lennon was the tongue in cheek sardonic wit, McCartney the earnest balladeer. On John Pizzarelli Meets the Beatles, a sharply conceived tribute which sets the duo’s classics in a jazz trio with big-band arrangements, the singer/guitarist hits the mark more often when he’s taking on the Lennon persona. He approaches “Cant’ Buy Me Love,” “When I’m 64,” and “Get Back” with a playful wink, jumping off his speedy melody lines and the rising brass sections for extended improvisational tradeoffs with pianist Ray Kennedy, and adding colorful touches like scatting and even ad libbing his own lyrical verses based on the originals. Likewise, he attacks the all-instrumental “Eleanor Rigby” with a jumpy, swinging aggression. Pizzarelli, however, becomes overly schmaltzy in presenting ballads like “You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away” and “Long and Winding Road” too seriously, with maudlin, straightforward arrangements that grind the party to a halt. The one exception is the more percussive “Oh Darling,” where his intense vocal helps the tune rise above the hotel lounge mentality. (by Jonathan Widran)

John Pizarelli

This is probably the most talked about CD I have made. The idea was to place the songs into a different time as if someone else had performed them first. For instance, “Can’t Buy Me Love” was a Woody Herman tune (hence, the Woodchopper’s Ball references), “Things We Said Today” was in the Moondance groove, “Here Comes The Sun” was a Jobim/Getz tribute, and so on. It is really a CD I am proud of, from Don Sebesky’s great arrangements (once again) to the terrific performances from the string players, big band members, soloists and trio. This CD was also #1 on the Swing Journal jazz charts in Japan and was released with two different songs in Canada. The Canadian version features the songs “You Can’t Do That” and “Got To Get You Into My Life.” They were nixed from the American release in favor of “Eleanor Rigby” and “You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away.” We also did a terrific concert for Canadian TV of the Beatle CD live entitled John Pizzarelli Chante Les Beatles. It has run on the BET on Jazz channel and features a Canadian big band and strings conducted by Don Sebesky. (John Pizzarelli)

Beatles fans love to explain that one key to the successful partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney was their contrasting songwriting personalities: Lennon was the tongue-in-cheek, sardonic wit, McCartney, the earnest balladeer. On john pizzarelli’s John Pizzarelli Meets the Beatles (RCA Victor), a well-conceived tribute that sets the duo’s classics in jazz-trio and big-band arrangements, the singer/guitarist hits the mark most often when taking on McCartney’s tunes. He approaches “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “When I’m 64,” and “Get Back” with a playful wink, jumping off his speedy melody lines and the rising brass sections for extended improvisational tradeoffs with pianist Ray Kennedy. Pizzarelli adds colorful touches like scatting and even ad-libs his own lyrical verses based on the originals. Likewise, he treats an instrumental version of “Eleanor Rigby” with an aggressive sense of swing. And his intense vocal on a percussive “Oh, Darling” helps the tune rise above mere cover-band fare. However, when Pizzarelli presents ballads like “You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away” and “Long and Winding Road” with maudlin arrangements, he pretty well grinds the party to a halt. (by Jazziz Maganzine, 2000)
John Pizarelli2

Personnel:
Harry Allen (saxophone)
Sanford Allen (violin)
Wayne Andre (trombone)
Kenny Berger (saxophone)
Joseph Bongiorno (bass)
Alfred Brown (violin)
Avril Brown (violin)
Kenneth Burward-Hoy (viola)
Stephanie Cummins (cello)
Rick Dolan (violin)
Max Ellen (violin)
Sammy Figueroa (percussion)
Barry Finclair (violin)
Andy Fusco  (saxophone)
Peter Gordon (french horn)
Adam Grabois (cello)
Juliet Haffner (viola)
Evan Johnson (violin)
Karen Karlsrud (violin)
Tony Kadleck (trumpet)
Gary Keller (saxophone)
Chungsun Kim (cello)
Jeanne LeBlanc (cello)
Jesse Levy (cello)
Lisa Matricardi (violin)
Melissa Meel (cello)
John Miller (bass)
John Mosca (trombone)
Laura Oatts (violin)
Jim O’Connor (rrumpet)
Ken Peplowski (clarinet)
Joel Pitchon (violin)
John Pizzarelli (guitar, vocals)
Martin Pizzarelli (bass)
Jim Pugh (trombone)
Allen Ralph (trombone)
Barry Ries (trumpet)
Maxine Roach (viola)
Douglas Romoff (bass)
Laura Seaton (violin)
Don Sebesky  (accordion, flute)
Richard Sortomme (violin)
Mitsue Takayama (viola)
Tony Tedesco (drums)
Liuh-Wen Ting (viola)
Leslie Tomkins (viola)
Ron Tooley (trumpet)
Belinda Whitney-Barratt (violin)
Chuck Wilson (saxophone)
Xin Zhao (violin)

Orchestra conducted by Don Sebesky

Booklet01A

Tracklist:
01. Can’t Buy Me Love 3.37
02. I’ve Just Seen A Face 2.49
03. Here Comes The Sun 5.05
04. Things We Said Today 4.16
05. You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away 3.26
06. Eleanor Rigby 5.03
07. And I Love Her 3.57
08. When I’m 64 2.46
09. Oh Darling 4.04
10. Get Back 4.03
11. Long And Winding Road 3.46
12. For No One 3.11

All songw written by John Lennon + Paul McCartney, except 03. which was written by George Harrison

CD1

 

 

*
**

AlternateFront+BackCover

Alternate front + back cover

Cathy Lemons Blues Band – Dark Road (1998)

frontcover1Cathy Lemons’ critically acclaimed CD “Dark Road” has won her some hard fought for recognition both as a songwriter and as soulful and expressive blues talent. Bkues Revue hailed “Dark Road” as “a burnished, scintillating disc and certainly one of the finest debuts from a contemporary female blues singer this year.” Vintage Guitar says this of Lemons’ vocal style: “She presents an almost classical quality to her voice. A dangerous approach to a tradition? You bet! But Lemons makes it work. The more you listen to this self-produced effort, the more you realize that it is a very individualistic emotional approach.” And Living Blues calls Lemons “a skillful and expressive singer” delivering blues “in a wide range of styles” from “dance-floor soul grooves” to “the occasional ballad.”

The quality of this CD is strengthened by an all-star line up. Tommy Castro  delivers his own fiery brand of guitar licks on the Lemons penned funk “Let Me Be Good,” and his wailing solo work on the slow blues “Takin’ a Train” (another original) can only be described as electrifying.

Rusty Zinn plays some raw Elmore James-style licks on another Lemons original “Hard Headed Man” and his “nasty tone and wild note bending” guitar work on the Junior Wells classic “Little By Little” leaves the listener wondering if this young “golden boy” might be from another generation of players.

cathylemonsbluesbandBut is it Steve Freund who is the guitar star on this CD. Kisliuk writes that Freund “fills in the edges around the snowmelt slow ‘Dirty Man’ with restraint and aching beauty.” DH of Vintage Guitar says that Freund’s “Lockwood-style finesse in tone and articulation work perfectly” with Lemons’ “delicate style.” Freund plays with beauty and intensity on the title cut “Dark Road,” creating a melancholic undertone, which builds as the song progresses. Freund’s 30 years in the blues business has indeed made him an exquisite accompanist.

David Maxwell is the pleasant surprise of this CD. His brilliant, jazz-influenced riffs on the Magic Sam classic “I Need You So Bad” create a richly textured rhythmic flow and his sinuous, Spann-like scales during his solo on the haunting “Worry, Worry” are rendered with magnificent feeling and precision.

Johnny Ace, Lemons’ partner and session leader, makes contributions with both bass and back up vocals. Ace’s style is simple and direct. He has an uncanny ability to follow Lemons in all her subtlety and zone in on just the right bass line to create a sexy, low-down groove. Ace becomes the very pulse, the very heart beat of the music. Nobody can play blues bass better than Johnny Ace.

So, as Mark A. Cole says of “Dark Road” in his Big City Blues review, “This is an excellent CD in that it combines Texas-rhythm influences with Chicago lead configurations. Lemons vocal work is top of the line … Definitely a winner! This CD has more talent and depth than you can imagine!” (by cdbaby.com)

bookletbackcover

In 2000 when it was released, “All Music” critic Hal Horowitz hailed the album as “the finest debut from a female singer this year.” Six time Blues Music Award winner Tommy Castro plays guitar on two tracks, another BMA award winner Rusty Zinn plays on two, and Grammy award winning guitarist Steve Freund rounds out the rest of the fourteen cuts, plus David Maxwell plays some brilliant keys. Chicago blues gems plus originals with fabulous singing from Cathy Lemons. (by allmusic.com)

cathylemons02

Personnel:
Johnny Ace (bass, background vocals)
Kevin Coggins (drums)
Steve Freund (guitar)
Cathy Lemons (Vocals)
David Maxwell (Piano)
+
Tommy Castro (guitar on 04. + 10.)
Rusty Zinn (guitar on 02. + 13.)

backcover

Tracklist:
01. Rolling And Tumbling (Morganfield) 4.18
02. Hard Headed Man (Lemons) 3.48
03. Dirty Man (Miller) 4.04
04. Let Me Be Good (Ace/Lemons) 4.40
05. Worry Worry (Davis/Taub) 5.26
06. Sayin It Plain feat. Steve Freund 03:07
07. Good Morning Little Schoolboy (Williamson) 5.55
08. Dark Road (Lemons) 6.08
09. Lonesome Whistle Blues (Toombs/Teat/Moore) 3.26
10. Takin A Train (Lemons) 5.56
11. I Need You So Bad (Maghett) 3.48
12. Just Got To Know (McCracklin) 3.46
13. Little By Little (unknown) 4.17
14. You Belong To Me (Magic Sam) 4.09

acelemons

Johnny Ace + Cathy Lemons

*
**

cathylemons01

Still alive and well: Cathy Lemons in 2014

Chicago – Christmas With Chicago (1998)

frontcover1In 1998 Chicago released their 25th album, called “The Christmas Album”.

And William Ruhlmann wrote about this album in “All Music Guide” (12/1999):

When Chicago first achieved national recognition in the late 1960s and early ’70s, it wasn’t hip for rock bands to make Christmas albums. Things changed, of course, but it took until 1998 for Chicago finally to fill this missing item in its catalog, at a time when the group seemed to have entered that phase of its career when it wanted to keep putting out records but didn’t want to risk releasing new material. (Chicago’s three previous releases had consisted of an album of big band standards and two greatest hits sets.) Whatever the circumstances, however, it was good to hear the Chicago style applied to seasonal standards. As ever, the group was a cooperative unit, with the three lead singers-Bill Champlin, Robert Lamm, and Jason Scheff-taking turns on the different songs, arranged by various band members and always allowing for generous contributions by the horn players Lee Loughnane, James Pankow, and Walt Parazaider. The songs were all seasonal favorites except for Loughnane and John Durrill’s “Child’s Prayer, ” featuring a choir dominated by the musicians’ children, which sounded so much like a Middle Ages English hymn that it fit right in. Highlights included a particularly moving vocal on “Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas” by the gruff-voiced Champlin, a wonderful doubled flute passage by Parazaider on “O Come All Ye Faithful, ” and a rare lead vocal by Loughnane on “Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!” But the whole album, pristinely produced by E Street Band pianist Roy Bittan, was well performed. It sounded exactly like you would expect a Chicago Christmas album to sound, and if you liked the band and holiday music, you’d like the record, too.

And here ist a very rare live performance from Chicgo, to promote this album, recorded live at the House Of Blues, Los Angeles, CA, December 8, 1998 —  it´s a broadcast recording … so, we can hear the sound of Chicago in an excellent quality …

Enjoy this album … but I have to say …  the early incarnation of Chicago (Transit Authority) was much better !

christmasinchicago01

Personnel:
Bill Champlin (vocals, keyboards, guitar)
Keith Howland (guitar, keyboards)
Tris Imboden (drums)
Robert Lamm (vocals, piano)
Lee Loughnane (trumpet, flügelhorn, vocals)
James Pankow (trombone)
Walter Parazaider (woodwinds)
Jason Scheff (vocals, bass)

studioalbum

The Christmas studio album (coming soon in this blog)

Tracklist:
01. Intro 1.23
02.Little Drummer Boy (Davis/Onorati/Simeone) 4.39
03. You´re The Inspiration () 4.30
04. Hard Habit To Break () 3.49
05. The Christmas Song () 3.59
06. Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow! (Kahn/Styne) 4.03
07. God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen (Traditional) 3.43
08. Saturday In The Park () 2.55
09. Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas (Martin/Blane) 4.17
10.  Just You N Me () 6.04
11. Hard To Say Sorry + Get Away () 5.31
12. Santa Claus Is Coming To Town (Gillespie/Coots) 4.11
13. Outro 1.18

christmasinchicago02
*
**

Sarband – Alla Turka – Oriental Obsession (1998)

frontcover1Musical director Dr. Vladimir Ivanoff, who founded
Sarband in 1986, connects cultures, people and
epochs, both as a scholar and a musician:
His programs unite musicians from widely different
cultures and musical backgrounds and mediate
between past and present, Early Music
and living traditions.

The cooperation in the ensemble is not a fashionable crossover, but conceived as a continuous dialogue
on equal terms. All the artists unrestrictedly contribute their native traditions, their personal histories and their own creativity to the programs, so that Sarband also ecomes a musical training ground for communication
and tolerance between different cultural identities.

«Sarband» means connection.
In Mid-Eastern music theory, this term signifies a link between two compositions within a musical suite.
Ensemble Sarband invites most diverse audiences as well as most diverse performers «to come together»;  it «binds» them to cultural experiences previously  perceived as alien. (by sarband.de)

vladimir-ivanoff

Vladimir Ivanoff

With Mozart’s “Rondo Alla Turca” at its core, this production encompasses early instances of a fascination with things exotic, an attitude based on the equation of the exotic with the promise of great happiness. European interest in Turkish music can be traced back to as early as the sixteenth century. It was in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, however, that “Turkish” music became really popular — in the “turqueries, ” exotic-sounding passages included in many operas. The album defines the historical point in time at which popular interest in non-European music was aroused for the first time: The perception of the world was no longer limited to Europe. “Alla Turca” presents unusual European translations of “Oriental” music. In Mozart’s famous “Rondo Alla Turca” motif, the lively confusion of exotica seems sort itself out, its pieces falling into place in a “rondo” of the strange and the familiar.

“Powerful sounds from Ivanoff: Shades of baroque, Turkish dervish music and the Orient, never mind the occasional Mozart, make this a disc worth a listen. This is a car accident (of Oriental and Occidental history thrown together), and we all stare at those as we drive by.” (JAM, February 1999)

sarband

Personnel:
Mustafa Dógan Dikmen (flute, vocals, percussion)
Vladimir Ivanoff (percussion)
Ihsan Özer (zither, percussion)
Ahmed Kadri Rizeli (fiddle)
Silke Strauf (violoncello)
Belinda Sykes (oboe, vocals)
Axel Weidenfeld (lute, guitar)
Mehmet Cemal Yesilcay (lute)

booklet01a

Tracklist
01. Rondo Alla Turca (1) (Mozart) 2.17
02. Elci Pesrev (Cantemir) 3.31
03. Izanum (Dona) 1.11
04. Chanson Turque (Nlainville) 4.42
05. Acem Ilahi (Bobowsky/Ufki) 6.12
06. Concerto Turco/Nominato Izia Semaisi (Toderini/Traditional) 7.41
07. Rondo Alla Turca (2) (Mozart) 1.05
08. Busis Derdim (Dona)
09. Rondo Alla Turca (3) (Mozart) 1.04
10. Hüseyni Ilahi (Bobowsky/Ufki) 7.24
11. Allahoy (Isaac) 3.14
12. Perdeh (Chardin) 1.31
13. Der Deste (Traditional) 4.58
14. Psalm 6 (Bobowsky/Ufki) 5.26
15. Hasta Ghiringium (Dona) 3.05
16. Hüseyni Pesrev (Murad) 6.31
17. Rondo Alla Turca (4) (Mozart) 1.10
18. Psalm 2 (Bobowsky/Ufki) 13.30

cd1

*
**

tray1

 

Diana Krall – When I Look in Your Eyes (1998)

FrontCover1When I Look in Your Eyes is the fifth studio album by Canadian singer Diana Krall, released on June 8, 1999 by Verve Records. It was nominated for a Grammy Award for Album of the Year, the first time in 25 years that a jazz album was nominated in that category, and won two awards for Best Jazz Vocal and Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical at the 42nd Grammy Awards. (by wikipedia)

With this CD, the young Canadian singer/pianist/arranger joins forces with producer Tommy LiPuma, who places his orchestral stamp on eight of the 13 tracks. It is the latest attempt to push Krall to an even wider pop/smooth jazz audience than she already enjoys. After all, Nat Cole, Wes Montgomery, and George Benson, among others, went this route. Wonder if she’d agree the cuts sans strings were more fun and challenging? Krall does get to it with central help from bassists John Clayton and Ben Wolfe, drummers Jeff Hamilton and Lewis Nash, and guitarist Russell Malone, all stellar players. Krall’s voice is sweet and sexy. She’s also flexible within her range and at times a bit kitschy, mostly the hopeless romantic. On this CD of love songs, it’s clear she’s cool but very much in love with this music. Bob Dorough’s “Devil May Care” and the insistent “Best Thing for You” really click. Favorites are a decent Shearing-esque “Let’s Fall in Love” with vibist Larry Bunker; a suave slow bossa on the opening number, “Let’s Face the Music”; the lusher-than-lush title track; and especially an incredible horn-fired fanfare intro/outro on the hip “Pick Yourself Up.” Some might call this fluff or mush, but it depends solely on your personal taste. This will certainly appeal to Krall’s fans, lovers, and lovers at heart. (by Michael G. Nastos)

DianaKrall01

Personnel:
John Clayton (bass)
Jeff Hamilton (drums)
Diana Krall (piano, vocals)
Russell Malone (guitar)
+
Chuck Berghofer – bass on 13
Alan Broadbent (piano on 13.)
Larry Bunker (vibraphone on 03. + 06,)
Pete Christlieb (saxophone on 13.)
Lewis Nash (drums on 06. + 08.)
Ben Wolfe (bass on 02., 06., 08. + 09.)

Booklet02A

Tracklist:
01. Let’s Face The Music And Dance (Berlin) 5.18
02. Devil May Care (Dorough) 3.20
03. Let’s Fall In Love (Koehler/Arlen) 4.19
04. When I Look In Your Eyes (Bricusse) 4.31
05. Popsicle Toes (Franks) 4.28
06. I’ve Got You Under My Skin (Porter) 6.10
07. I Can’t Give You Anything But Love (McHugh/Fields) 2.32
08. I’ll String Along with You (Harry Warren, Al Dubin) 4.45
09. East Of The Sun (And West Of The Moon) (Bowman) 4.57
10. Pick Yourself Up (Kern/Fields) 3.02
11. The Best Thing For You (Berlin) 2.37
12. Do It Again (Gershwin/DeSylva) 4.35
+
13. Why Should I Care (hidden track:) (Eastwood/Sager/Thompson-Jenner) 3.44
CD1*
**

Inlet02A

Ron Clearfield – Dream Manifestation (1998)

FrontCover1Classically trained cellist Ron Clearfield has branched into a diverse range of musical styles. In addition to working with such classical music icons as Leonard Bernstein, Aaron Copeland, and Seiji Ozawa, Clearfield has accompanied such pop artists as George Benson, Linda Ronstadt, and Dionne Warwick. He was a featured solo cellist on Judy Collins’ Christmas Special for the A&E network. On his own recordings, Dream Manifestation and Time on Earth, Clearfield skillfully blends the classical tradition with world music and jazz influences to create a highly atmospheric sound. The grandson of a pianist and teacher, who emigrated to the United States from Russia, and the son of a clarinet player, Clearfield studied violin from the age of ten. He switched to cello shortly afterwards. Receiving a Masters degree in cello performance from the New England Conservatory of Music, he made his professional debut with the Indianapolis Symphony, the same group that his father had launched his career with more than two decades before. Clearfield remained with the Indianapolis Symphony only briefly before he left to seek work as a freelance cellist in Philadelphia, Houston, New York, and Miami. Building a studio in his home, he recorded three self-produced albums before signing with the EverSound label in 1998. His debut album, Dream Manifestation, was released a few months later. For the past three decades, Clearfield has meditated regularly, using techniques that he learned from Guru Maharaji. He currently serves as associate principal cellist of the Asheville Symphony in Asheville, North Carolina and conducts the Asheville City/Buncombe County Schools Orchestra.(by Craig Harris)

RonClearfield01This accomplished cellist plays with The Florida Symphony Orchestra, and on this second effort, combines his sterling classical background with beautiful keyboard arrangements. The mixture of strings, pianos and light electronic orchestration will make for perfect in-store listening. The second album by this symphony cellist from Florida is a celebration of the beauty of the planet and of humanity’s aspirations for peace and harmony. Playing piano and synthesizers as well as cello, Ron Clearfield is joined by other musicians on reeds, flute, harp and percussion to create gentle and uplifting melodies that combine the elegance of classical music with the warmth and expansiveness of New Age. The crown jewel of the album is the nine-minute “Listen…the Earth is Weeping,” where a section of Indian flavored cello, tabla and tamboura is seamlessly inserted into the symphonic structure of the piece. Dream Manifestation is an engaging work of tenderness and beauty that both relaxes and inspires the listener.(allmusic)

From the cover photo of Ron Clearfield playing his cello against a painted backdrop of mountains, clouds, and floating red leaves, I expected Dream Manifestation to be a cello album. It is instead a powerful ensemble work. Clearfield plays piano and keyboards as well as cello, tamboura, and percussion, and is joined by other musicians on oboe, English and French horns, flutes, zither, strings, harp, and guitar.
With a theme of unity, peace, and the healing of Earth and its inhabitants, the music is very emotional and dramatic. I am especially impressed with “Listen… The Earth Is Weeping” – a tour de force with orchestration, keyboards, and percussion. Strong Eastern RonClearfield02influences are heard, but there is a very universal quality that is so fitting and appropriate to the theme. At 9 1/2 minutes, this piece is fully realized and is mesmerizing from start to finish – I can’t get enough of “Listen…”, and would recommend the CD based on that track even if the rest of the CD wasn’t fascinating. But it is! It opens with “Home”, a study in peaceful tranquility with flute, cello, and harp. “Soliloquy” is a lovely, serene “duet” with cello and synth. “Farewell”, composed in honor of Clearfield’s father, is haunting – simple, direct, and from the heart. “The Return and Dance of Gaia” is much more upbeat and rhythmic. There are Eastern influences in this piece, too, giving it a very warm and exotic feel. “Dream Manifestation” is cinematic in its sweep and grandeur. A bittersweet, questioning mood on piano builds to a dramatic climax and becomes delicate and gentle as the cello assumes the lead. “The Marriage of Heaven and Earth” is almost anthemic with several movements, and gives the closing a very peaceful message of peace and optimism. This is a very moving and powerful work, and I highly recommend it. (by Kathy Parsons)

In other words: One o the finest new age recordings I´ve ever heard !

BookletBackCover1

Personnel:
Tim Adams (percussion)
Ron Clearfield  (cello, keyboards, percussion, tamboura)
Mary Byrd Daniels (violin)
John Dee (english horn, oboe)
Danny Ellis (keyboards)
Jomo Faulks (percussion)
Jeff Johnson (guitar)
Jennifer Hart Merrell (french horn)
Tim Richards  (tabla)
Jeanne Tarrant (flute)
George Tortorelli (bamboo flute, zither)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Home 5.55
02. Soliloquy 3.44
03. Farewell 5.33
04. The Return And Dance Of Gaia 5.38
05. Dream Manifestation 6.41
06. Listen…the Earth Is Weeping 9.27
07. The Marriage Of Heaven And Earth 7.08

Music composed by Ron Clearfield

CD1

*
**

Antonio Vivaldi – Violin Concertos for Anna Maria (Mariana Sirbu) (2012)

FrontCover1With the number of Vivaldi concerto recordings flooding the market, what is a starter CD-buyer to do? How can he or she make a choice? Perhaps if a reviewer has any function at all, it is to steer the prospective purchaser in the right direction. If you like period instruments, the new disc with Giorgio Sasso might be a candidate for an ideal one-CD Vivaldi choice. The Roman group plays brilliantly, and the selection of works for string orchestra is superb, with two emotional pieces, a Sinfonia in G minor and a Sonata in E flat, Al S Sepulchro (At Christ’s Tomb/Burial). The other disc, on modern instruments (but very crisply played), is a series of six works composed for Vivaldi’s star pupil at the Pietà, Anna Maria, who performed on violin, viola d’amore, cello, lute, theorbo, mandolin and harpsichord. These are delightful violin concertos, admirably played by Mariana Sirbu and I Musici, one of the pioneers of the Vivaldi revival. (by HC Robbins Landon)

BackCover1

Personnel:
Mariana Sirbu (violin)
+
I Musici

Booklet02A

Tracklist:

Concerto In D Minor For Violin, Strings And Continuo Rv 248
01. 1. Allegro 5.02
02. 2. Largo-Presto 3.29
03. 3. Allegro Ma Non Molto3.48
Concerto In D For Violin, Strings And Continuo Rv 229
04. 1. Allegro 4.00
05. 2. Largo 3.17
06. 3. Allegro 2.56
Concerto In B Flat For Violin, Strings And Continuo Rv 363
07. 1. Allegro 2.56
08. 2. Largo 2.42
09. 3. Allegro 2.55
Concerto In E Flat For Violin, Strings And Continuo Rv 260
10. 1. Allegro 4.01
11. 2. Adagio 3.35
12. 3. Allegro 4.17
Concerto In E Flat For Violin, Strings And Continuo Rv 349
13. 1. Allegro 5.07
14. 2. Largo 3.13
15. 3. Allegro Ma Poco 3.56
Concerto In E Flat For Violin, Strings And Continuo  Rv 267
16. 1. Allegro 3.36
17. 2. Largo 2.53
18. 3. Allegro Ma Poco 2.56

Composed by Antonio Vivaldi

CD1

*
**