Rory Gallagher – Notes From San Francisco (2011)

FrontCover1.jpgNotes from San Francisco is a posthumous album by Irish musician Rory Gallagher. Released in 2011, It consists of two CDs. The first disc is a never released album that Gallagher recorded in San Francisco in December 1977. The album was to be a major shift for Gallagher. Rather than producing it himself, he worked with Elliot Mazer a successful producer who had a long track record with artists such as Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin and The Band. At the last minute — causing great distress to his manager and brother Dónal and to his record company — Gallagher decided to just pull the record. In an interview, Gallagher stated “it wasn’t because of the material or the musicians or anything like that. It was a song thing that I didn’t think on the technical side everything worked. So I scrapped the thing” After scrapping the album Gallagher reworked his band firing all the musicians except the bass player and hiring a new drummer. This new Gallagher power trio re-recorded the San Francisco songs with Gallagher producing and released them as Photo-Finish.  Shortly before his death, Rory reportedly gave Dónal permission to eventually release the original San Francisco versions of the songs if they were remixed. Dónal had his son Daniel remix the songs in 2011. The second disc is a live performance also recorded in San Francisco in December 1979.  Peter Notes from San Francisco is a posthumous album by Irish musician Rory Gallagher. Released in 2011, It consists of two CDs. The first disc is a never released album that Gallagher recorded in San Francisco in December 1977. The album was to be a major shift for Gallagher. Rather than producing it himself, he worked with Elliot Mazer a successful producer who had a long track record with artists such as Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin and The Band.

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At the last minute — causing great distress to his manager and brother Dónal and to his record company — Gallagher decided to just pull the record. In an interview, Gallagher stated “it wasn’t because of the material or the musicians or anything like that. It was a song thing that I didn’t think on the technical side everything worked. So I scrapped the thing” After scrapping the album Gallagher reworked his band firing all the musicians except the bass player and hiring a new drummer. This new Gallagher power trio re-recorded the San Francisco songs with Gallagher producing and released them as Photo-Finish. [1] Shortly before his death, Rory reportedly gave Dónal permission to eventually release the original San Francisco versions of the songs if they were remixed. Dónal had his son Daniel remix the songs in 2011. The second disc is a live performance also recorded in San Francisco in December 1979.

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It’s surprising, considering the interesting back story on the studio portion of this posthumous Rory Gallagher release, that there are no notes on the actual packaging to chronicle its eventual appearance in 2011, nearly 33 years after being recorded in December 1977. According to the press release though, Gallagher clashed with producer Elliot Mazer about the mix on these dozen tunes and not only shelved the tapes, but broke up his longtime band after the San Francisco session ended. Out went keyboardist Lou Martin and drummer Rod de’Ath, replaced by skinsman Ted McKenna (bassist Gerry McAvoy remained) to strip down the sound for his next phase. About half these songs, such as “Mississippi Sheiks,” “Fuel to the Fire,” “Brute Force & Ignorance,” “Cruise on Out,” and “Overnight Bag” appeared on 1978’s Photo Finish in different performances. Some, like the closing “Out on the Tiles” and “B Girl,” will be new to all but the most ardent Gallagher followers. Shortly before his death, the guitarist apparently mentioned to his brother Donald that he’d like the tapes to be released someday if they were remixed, which is exactly what Donald’s son Daniel did in 2011, resulting in these long-lost tracks finally seeing the light of day.

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Despite Gallagher’s reservations, everything here is up to his usual high standard, and he obviously respected the material enough to re-record the bulk of it with a different band and producer later that year. The electric violin on “Mississippi Sheiks” is a new twist on both Gallagher’s blues-rock style and the song, which helps differentiate this version from the more famous one that appeared on Photo Finish. Saxophone, played by Martin Fiero, enhances two cuts, also bringing a unique groove, especially to the lumbering “Brute Force and Ignorance.” The package includes a December 1979 live show, also recorded in San Francisco, that finds Gallagher and his two-piece in typically fine fettle. They revisit the Taste-era chestnut “Bullfrog Blues” and tear into the rarity “I’m Leavin'” with their notorious paint-peeling approach. He digs back some years for a tough take on “Tattoo’d Lady,” but most of the set is derived from his mid- to late-’70s albums Top Priority, Photo Finish, and Calling Card. A breathless “Sea Cruise” closes the set, and is probably a nod to Jerry Lee Lewis, on whose album Gallagher guested. It caps off a roaring, electrifying show that, along with the studio disc, makes a worthwhile addition to any Gallagher lover’s collection. Even lacking detailed liner notes, this is a keeper and an important historical document in Rory Gallagher’s short but eventful career. (by Hal Horowitz)

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Personnel:
Rod de’Ath (drums on CD 1)
Rory Gallagher (guitar, vocals, harmonica)
Lou Martin (keyboards)
Gerry McAvoy (bass)
Ted McKenna (drums on CD 2)
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Martin Fiero (saxophone on CD 1 – 01.)
Joe O’Donnell (violin on CD 1 – 08.)

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Tracklist:

CD 1 (studio recordings):
01. Rue The Day 4.26
02. Persuasion 4.45
03. B Girl 4.42
04. Mississippi Sheiks 5.56
05. Wheels Within Wheels 3.40
06. Overnight Bag 4.46
07. Cruise On Out 5.19
08. Brute Force & Ignorance 5.45
09. Fuel To The Fire 5.43
10. Wheels Within Wheels (alternate version) 3.55
11. Cut A Dash 3.49
12. Out On The Tiles 4.22

CD 2 (live recordings):
01. Follow Me (from Top Priority) 6.25
02. Shinkicker (from Photo-Finish) 3.42
03. Off The Handle (from Top Priority) 7.01
04. Bought And Sold (from Against the Grain) 4.43
05. I’m Leavin’ 4.35
06. Tattoo’d Lady (from Tattoo) 6.49
07. Do You Read Me (from Calling Card) 6.11
08. Country Mile (from Calling Card) 3.51
09. Calling Card (from Calling Card) 5.51
10. Shadow Play (from Photo-Finish) 5.11
11. Bullfrog Blues  (from Live in Europe) (Traditiional) 5.38
12. Sea Cruise 3.29

All songs written by Rory Gallagher except as indicate

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Rory Gallagher (2 March 1948 – 14 June 1995)

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Blodwyn Pig – Fillmore West (1970)

Muro do Classic RockBlodwyn Pig was a British blues rock band, founded in 1968 by guitarist–vocalist–songwriter Mick Abrahams.

Abrahams left Jethro Tull, due to a falling-out with Tull vocalist Ian Anderson, after their debut album, This Was, was released, and formed Blodwyn Pig with Jack Lancaster (saxophone and flute), Andy Pyle (bass guitar), and Ron Berg (drums). Ex-Yes and future Flash guitarist Peter Banks became one of several guitarists to succeed Abrahams after he left to form his own band for a time.

With Abrahams and Lancaster in the lead, Blodwyn Pig recorded two albums, Ahead Rings Out in 1969 and Getting To This in 1970.[1] Both reached the Top Ten of the UK Albums Chart[2] and charted in the United States; Ahead Rings Out displayed a jazzier turn on the heavy blues–rock that formed the band’s core rooted in the British 1960s rhythm and blues scene from which sprang groups like The Yardbirds, Free and eventually Led Zeppelin. Saxophonist–singer Lancaster (who often played two horns at once, like his idol Rahsaan Roland Kirk[citation needed]) was at least as prominent in the mix as Abrahams; some critics[who?] thought this contrast bumped the band toward a freer, more experimental sound on the second album.

The single “Summer Day” from the album Getting To This failed to chart, but the quartet became something of a favourite on the underground concert circuit. Largely due to Abrahams’s disillusionment with the business side of music, Blodwyn Pig eventually became an on-again, off-again concern; Lancaster at one point became a record producer, and Pyle eventually joined Savoy Brown. Over the years since their original formation, Blodwyn Pig reformed several times, usually with Abrahams and Lancaster leading the group, and recorded two more albums in the 1990s (by wikipedia)

And here´a pretty good audience bootleg album (as a opening act for Procol Harum) from this criminaly underrated group from the early Seventies.

Recorded live at the Fillmore West, New York, August 03, 1970

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Personnel:
Mick Abrahams (guitar, vocals)
Ron Berg (drums)
Jack Lancaster (saxophone, flute)
Andy Pyle (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. It’s Only Love (Abrahams) 3.40
02. Ain’t Ya Comin’ Home Babe (Pyle/Lancaster/Abrahams) 10,56
03. Dear Jill (Abrahams) 5.17
04. Worry (Pyle) 9.48
05. San Francisco Sketches (Lancaster) 15.45
06. It’s Only Love (Abrahams) 3.44
07. Change Song (Abrahams) 4.54
08. Cat Squirrel (Traditional) 12.35
09. See My Way (Abrahams) 8.38
10. Slow Down (Williams) 6.25
11. Rock Me (Jackson) 4.10

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Savoy Brown – Looking In (1970)

FrontCover1.jpgLooking In is the sixth album by the band Savoy Brown.

It was released by Decca in 1970 (SKL 5066). For release in the USA and Canada tapes were leased to Parrot Records (PAS 71042).

The album reached no. 50 in the UK. (by wikipedia)

Savoy Brown’s blues-rock sound takes on a much more defined feel on 1970’s Looking In and is one of this band’s best efforts. Kim Simmonds is utterly bewildering on guitar, while Lonesome Dave Peverett does a fine job taking over lead singing duties from Chris Youlden who left halfway through the year. But it’s the captivating arrangements and alluring ease of the music that makes this a superb listen. The pleading strain transformed through Simmonds’ guitar on “Money Can’t Save Your Soul” is mud-thick with raw blues, and the comfort of “Sunday Night” is extremely smooth and laid back.

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“Take It Easy” sounds like it could have been a B.B. King tune as it’s doused with relaxed guitar fingering. The entire album is saturated with a simple, British blues sound but the pace and the marbled strands of bubbly instrumental perkiness fill it with life. Even the Yardbirds-flavored “Leaving Again” is appealing with its naïve hooks, capped off with a heart-stopping guitar solo. This album along with Street Corner Talking best exemplify Savoy Brown’s tranquilizing style. (by Mike DeGagne)

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Personnel:
Lonesome Dave (vocals, guitar)
Roger Earl (drums)
Kim Simmond (guitar, piano)
Tony Steven (bass)
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Owen Finnegan (percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. Gypsy (Simmonds) 1.02
02. Poor Girl (Stevens) 4.09
03. Money Can’t Save Your Soul (Peverett/Simmonds) 5.32
04. Sunday Night (Simmonds) 5.25
05. Looking In (Peverett/Simmonds) 5.19
06. Take It Easy (Peverett/Simmonds) 5.44
07. Sitting An’ Thinking (Simmonds) 2.54
08. Leavin’ Again (Peverett/Simmonds) 8.30
09. Romanoff (Simmonds) 1.02

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More Savoy Brown:

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Jo Harman And Company – Live At The Royal Albert Hall (2014)

FrontCover1.jpgJo Harman (born 21 September 1987) is a British singer and songwriter.

Born in Luton, England, Harman grew up in the Devon village of Lustleigh, before moving to London to study for a BA Performing Arts. After travelling to India, following the death of her father, she attended Brighton Institute of Modern Music in Brighton. In 2011, she self-released Live at Hideaway, whilst she developed her songcraft toward making a debut studio album.

This got the attention of Live Nation in the region and Harman’s first gig in Europe was to 7,000 people opening for The Cranberries both in Europe and in the UK. While opening for them, she played a number of multi-genre festivals, including the Cheltenham Jazz Festival and the Isle of Wight Festival. Her second album, Dirt on My Tongue, was released in 2013. Harman’s song to her father, “Sweet Man Moses”, was JoHarman01nominated as best composition at the 2012 British Blues Awards and this was followed by “Worthy of Love” being nominated in the same category the following year, together with a “Best Female Singer” nomination.

In 2014, she and her bandmates in “Jo Harman and Company” were nominated for seven British Blues Awards. She appeared at BluesFest where her performance was recorded by the BBC and released as a live Album. Harman has worked with members of Average White Band.

In February 2017, she released her second studio album, People We Become. The first single from the album, “When We Were Young”, featuring backup vocals from Michael McDonald, achieved BBC Radio 2 playlist Status. (by Wikipedia)

Jo Harman is the female shining light of the British Blues scene. That is beyond doubt, the critical feedback on her debut album has been universally positive. The album Jo Harman and Company Live at The Royal Albert Hall was recorded at Bluesfest by the BBC in 2013 and it is fitting that it gets it’s UK release two days before Jo returns to perform with her amazing band this year. -(by amazon.co.uk)

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In 2012, this reviewer and e-zine discovered a blues chanteuse ‘across the pond’ in the UK named Jo Harman. Back then, she and her ensemble performed Live At Hideaway; now they’re Live at the Royal Albert Hall. This year Jo was selected from six finalists to be “Female Vocalist of the Year” at the British Blues Awards. According to her promotional materials, she revealed, “I’m not entirely sure music should be a competition in quite this way, which is why I never particularly mentioned the nomination or campaigned for votes.” This attitude is refreshing in an era of ‘winner-take-all’, no matter what the endeavor or the cost. Jo is never afraid to be herself above all, giving everything to her sultry take on blues rock and ballads. On this album, it’s typically low-key, despite a few fast and gritty numbers. Six out of eight are compositions either written or co-written by Harman herself. The three mentioned below showcase her voice best.

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Says Harman of their finished product, in the liner notes: “This is a caught-in-the-moment, as-it-happened, honest recording made by the BBC. There are no edits, no fixes, no processing, no colouring…What you hear is what we played, raw and untampered.”

Track 02: “Cold Heart” – Slightly reminiscent of Sheryl Crow’s “I Shall Believe”, this original song is almost eerie. It’s a slow burner, but as hot as a certain infernal place. Harman tells her partner what absolutely no one wants to hear: “You’ve got one thing: a cold heart.” It’s an ultimatum as much as a description, the final word in a broken relationship. Steve Watts is understated yet brilliant on piano keyboards, which complement Jo’s lilting voice perfectly.

Track 03: “Ain’t No Love in the Heart of the City” – This cover of an R&B hit by Michael Price and Dan Walsh, popularized by Bobby “Blue” Bland, is absolutely super. “Ain’t no love in the heart of the city; ain’t no love in the heart of town. Ain’t no love, and it’s sure ‘nuff a pity. Ain’t no love, ‘cause you ain’t around.” A timeless sentiment such as this is best backed up by Dave Ital’s rollicking electric guitar solo.

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Track 05: “Underneath the River” – With an irresistible rock ‘hook’ and thumping backbeat by Martin “Magic” Johnson, track five just might drive blues rock fans insane with excitement. It’s a surefire party anthem with just the right touch of sweetness amid the spice. “Girls,” Jo explains beforehand, “I think you’ll understand there are times when we feel a little bit crazy, and you know what? The men, too.”

Jo Harman and Co. will delight fans in Britain and worldwide with Live at the Royal Albert Hall! (by Rainey Wetnight)

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Personnel:
Jo Harman (vocals)
Dave Ital (guitar, vocals)
Martin “Magic” Johnson (drums)
Andy Tolman (bass)

Steve Watts (keyboards, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Through The Night (Harman/Mayfield) 5.43
02. Cold Heart (Harman) 6.31
03. Ain’t No Love In The Heart Of The City (Price/Walsh)
04. (This Is My) Amnesty (Davies/Harman) 6.40
05. Underneath The River (Davies/Harman) 5.21
06. Sweet Man Moses (Harman) 6.08
07. Sideways (Greenwood) 8.59
08. Better Woman (Haman/McKenzie) 6.00

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The Mick Clarke Band – Live At The Splendid (1989)

FrontCover1Mick began his solo career in the early 80s and has become an established name on the European scene, touring regularly in every country from Finland down to Italy. Praised for his fiery “straight from the wood” guitar sound, he has appeared on numerous festivals with artists such as Robert Cray, Johnny Winter and Rory Gallagher. Mick has released fifteen solo albums so far.

Mick began his career with KILLING FLOOR part of the British blues boom of the late 60s. The band backed Texas blues guitar star Freddie King and toured with legends such as Howlin’ Wolf and Otis Spann. Killing Floor has recently reformed for recording and tour projects, and recent live work included a performance at Sweden Rock Festival 2012.

MickClarke01In the mid 70s Mick co-formed SALT a powerful blues-rock act who were a big hit on the London scene in the 70s playing regularly at the Marquee and other top venues. The band played at the Reading Festival and also opened for Muddy Waters at two major London concerts. SALT has also reformed for occasional re-union tours.

THE MICK CLARKE BAND originally started working around the London area in the early 80s, but quickly received offers of work from mainland Europe and the United States. Early festival appearances such as the Belgium R&B Festival in Peer confirmed their appeal for continental audiences, while the US tours established a world wide reputation for the band. (by www.bluesbartring.co.uk)

And here´s a very rare and superb soundboard recording, taken from my old live tape collection … (guess I got this tape from my old friend Markus Gygax from Switzerland  … he died to early !)

And if you like this fucking good old way of British Blues … you should listen … because Mick Clarke is one of the finest musicians from the second generation of this Music … and … he´s still alive and well … still touring, still recording … WOW !

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Personnel:
Chris Lloyd Baron (harmonica)
Mick Clarke (guitar, vocals)
Mike Hirsh (drums)
Mick Phillips (bass)
Peter Terry (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Intro 0.53
02. All These Blues (Parker) 5.07
03. Looking For Trouble (Clarke) 3.49
04. Careless Love (Handy) 4.29
05. Night Time Is The Right Time (Hooker) 7.03
06. Walkin´ Blues (House) 4.47
07. Walkin´ By Myself (Rogers) 4.45
08. It Hurts Me Too (Red) 6.52
09. You Need Love (Dixon) 5.13
10. Tore Down (King/Thompson) 6.05
11. TV Blues (Clarke) + Madison Blues (James) 9.04
12. Mona (McDaniels) 5.31
13. Full Moon Boogie (Clarke) 5.21
14. Nineteen Years Old (Morganfield) 9.44
15. Nothing But A Fool + Shake That Boogie (Clarke) 9.30

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ZZ Top – Deguello (1979)

FrontCover1Degüello is the sixth studio album by the American rock band ZZ Top, released in 1979.

“Degüello” means “decapitation” or, idiomatically, when something is said to be done “a degüello”, it means “no quarter” (as in “no surrender to be given or accepted–a fight to the death”) in Spanish. It also was the title of a Moorish-origin bugle call used by the Mexican Army at the Battle of the Alamo, Texas, in 1836. It was the first ZZ Top release on Warner Bros. Records and eventually went platinum.

Degüello was produced by Bill Ham, recorded and mixed by Terry Manning, and mastered by Bob Ludwig. (by wikipedia)

Just before Billy Gibbons (vocals/guitars), Dusty Hill (bass/vocals) and Frank Beard (drums) successfully integrated synthesizers into their formula, 1979’s Deguello further nudged Texas’ proudest boogie-blues outfit into the big time. Gibbons’ bedrock riff and sneaky vocal melody on iconic single “Cheap Sunglasses” still loom large on a modern FM soundscape shaped in part by indebted groups like the Black Keys, while the warped “Manic Mechanic”underscores their importance to future genre-manipulating misfits (and avowed ZZ Top acolytes) such as Ministry’s Al Jourgensen. But 1983’s Eliminator’s willfully gimmicky string of videos forever colored the band’s image, leaving some with the misconception that Gibbons, Hill and Beard are mere goofballs, thus sadly resigning the essential Deguello and its preceding LPs to relative under-appreciation. (by Rollin Stone)

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Degüello opens with a cover of Sam & Dave’s 1968 Soul hit “I Thank You”, written by Isaac Hayes and David Porter. ZZ Top’s version takes the Soul roots and treats it with Texas flavored blues-boogie, with Gibbons vocals being extra rough but potent. “She Loves My Automobile” is more blues with the added synthesized horn arrangement by Hill complimenting Gibbon’s bluesy guitar solos.

“I’m Bad, I’m Nationwide” is more rock oriented than the previous tracks with a cool drum shuffle by Frank Beard. The song is cut a bit rough with the overdubbed guitars, but this ultimately adds to the overall charm of the song, which was released as a single. A cool outro goes into a bit of a funk with a backing clavichord by Hill. The fine beat-driven ballad “A Fool for Your Stockings” is sonically different than anything else on the album, with a few excellent, mood-driven guitar instrumentals above dry and pointed bass and drums. Side One ends with “Manic Mechanic”, a unique and almost Frank Zappa-esque track with oddly-produced spoken vocals over strong rock and funk riffing.

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Like the first side, the second starts with a cover. Robert Johnson‘s “Dust My Broom”, was made most famous by Elmore James in the 1950s and ZZ Top’s version sticks pretty close to that version with a pure, standard blues arrangement and some slide guitars. “Lowdown In the Street” is back to a more edgy approach, with an interesting vocal arrangement that complements the main riff. “Hi Fi Mama” features Hill’s only lead vocals on the album and he employs a Little Richard-type hyper approach to the vocals. Musically, there is a nice back-n-forth between Gibbons’ guitars and Hill’s synth horn arrangement.

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The album’s climax comes with “Cheap Sunglasses”, built on a consistent groove which has been derided as either a rip-off of Edger Winter’s “Frankenstein” or Blind Faith’s “Had to Cry Today” (or both). No matter the case, this is a musical highlight for the band, with a long, cool, middle section built on a bass groove and key riffs with some bluesy lead guitar by Gibbons and great drumming by Beard throughout. After a final verse, the song slowly dissolves through scaled back groove. “Esther Be the One” is the most like a standard late seventies pop/rock song, with a full arrangement of dual guitars, keyboards, and a great bass groove to top off the album.

The platinum selling Degüello reached the Top 40 on the charts and sparked the group’s first tour of Europe in 1980. More importantly, it re-ignited ZZ Top’s career and introduced the band to a new radio audience, which brought even more popularity through the early 1980s. (by classicrockreview.com)

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ZZ Top returned after an extended layoff in late 1979 with Degüello, their best album since 1973’s Tres Hombres. During their time off, ZZ Top didn’t change much — hell, their sound never really changed during their entire career — but it did harden, in a way. The grooves became harder, sleeker, and their off-kilter sensibility and humor began to dominate, as “Cheap Sunglasses” and “Fool for Your Stockings” illustrate. Ironically, this, their wildest album lyrically, doesn’t have the unhinged rawness of their early blooze rockers, but the streamlined production makes it feel sleazier all the same, since its slickness lets the perversity slide forth. And, forget not, the trio is in fine shape here, knocking out a great set of rockers and sounding stylish all the time. Undoubtedly one of their strong suits. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Frank Beard (drums, percussion, alto saxophone on 02. + 08.)
Billy Gibbons (vocals, guitar, baritone saxophone on 02. + 08.)
Dusty Hill (bass, background vocals, vocals on 06. + 08., tenor saxophone on 02. + 08.)

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Tracklist:
01. I Thank You (Porter/Hayes) 3.26
02. She Loves My Automobile (Gibbons/Hill/Beard) 2.23
03. I’m Bad, I’m Nationwide (Gibbons/Hill/Beard) 4.47
04. A Fool For Your Stockings (Gibbons/Hill/Beard) 4.17
05. Manic Mechanic (Gibbons/Hill/Beard) 2.36
06. Dust My Broom (James) 3.09
07. Lowdown In The Street (Gibbons/Hill/Beard) 2.50
08. Hi Fi Mama (Gibbons/Hill/Beard) 2.26
09. Cheap Sunglasses (Gibbons/Hill/Beard) 4.48
10. Esther Be The One (Gibbons/Hill/Beard) 3.31

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Ten Years After – Undead (1968)

NovaFC1Undead is a live album by Ten Years After, recorded at the small jazz club, Klooks Kleek, in London, May 1968, and released in August of that year. The show combined blues, boogie and jazz playing that merged more traditional rock and roll with 1950s-style jump blues. The album “amply illustrates” Alvin Lee’s “eclectic” use of the pentatonic scale mixed with other modalities

Recorded live in a small London club, Undead contains the original “I’m Going Home,” the song that brought Ten Years After its first blush of popularity following the Woodstock festival and film in which it was featured. However, the real strength of this album is side one, which contains two extended jazz jams, “I May Be Wrong, But I Won’t Be Wrong Always” and Woody Herman’s “Woodchopper’s Ball,” both of which spotlight guitarist Alvin Lee’s amazing speed and technique. Side two is less interesting, with an extended slow blues typical of the time, a drum solo feature, and the rock & roll rave-up of “I’m Going Home.” (by Jim Newsom)

Ad

Put whatever it is your listening to down for a moment and check this out.
Ten Years After very wisely releases a live album for their second release, giving you all the band have to offer and an Alvin Lee.

Never was the biggest fan of Alvin Lee’s nasally vocal delivery, but absolutely zero of that matters either way, because the band cooks.
Alvin Lee is the star of the show, as with every Ten Years After show, completely commanding the atmosphere and mowing people down with his guitar skills.
One dimensional, yet lighting fast jazz/blues runs fronting a very capable ensemble (the organ for some reason though always got in the way for me) tearing through standards and originals.

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Check out the original “Woodchopper’s Ball”, and then listen to what’s going on here…very interesting.
The feeling is intimate which always make for the best live albums, and you can feel the sweat through your speakers.
I’m guessing prior to their appearance at Woodstock, it was this album boasting “I’m Going Home” which made them.

This is very good golden age era rock to blast, and every fan of this era should be giving this a listen, if not owning it already. (by breakwind)

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Personnel:
Chick Churchill (organ)
Alvin Lee (guitar, vocals)
Ric Lee (drums)
Leo Lyons (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. I May Be Wrong, But I Won’t Be Wrong Always (A,Lee) 10.35
02. Woodchopper’s Ball (Herman/Bishop) 7.48
03. Spider In My Web (A.Lee) 7.38
04. Summertime (Gershwin) / Shantung Cabbage (R,Lee) 5.59
05. I’m Going Home (A.Lee) 6.38
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06. Rock Your Mama (A.Lee) 3.26
07. Spoonful (Dixon) 6.39
08. Standing At The Crossroads )Johnson) 4.10
09. I Can’t Keep from Crying, Sometimes / Extension on One Chord (Kooper/A.Lee) 17.05

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