Gary Hoey – Deja Blues (2013)

FrontCover1Deja Blues is an interesting collection of blues tunes that features the blues skills of the talented rock and surf style guitarist Gary Hoey. Most people know him as an instrumental guitar player along the lines of a Steve Vai or Joe Satriani because of his billboard hit “Hocus Pocus,” or possibly know him from his Ho Ho Hoey Christmas albums, or have seen trading licks on tour with Jeff Beck, Ted Nugent, Peter Frampton, and Dick Dale. Let’s set the record straight – Gary is not a one trick rock guitar shredder.

The album has many Gary Hoey originals, some of which feature great guest appearances, including James Montgomery on “Boot Hill Blues,” Jon Butcher on the Texas Shuffle “Almost Over You,” Johnny A on “She’s Walking,” and finally, Frank Hannon on the southern rocking “Got to Believe.” There are a couple of covers of traditional blues songs where Gary makes the blues rock. “Going Down” is a down, dirty rockin’ take on the Don Nix penned classic recorded by everyone from the late great Freddie King to Led Zeppelin and Pearl Jam. Along with that is the lightly distorted Albert King classic “Born Under A Bad Sign.” An interesting track at the end is “Hold Your Head Up High” which features some slide guitar playing. If you close your eyes and forget who you’re listening to you might confuse this with an outtake form a Derek Trucks Band release.

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There are two stand out tracks on this album though. “Stranger” is an atmospheric mysterious blues where the tones clearly set the mood for one of the lyrics when Gary sings about being “like a stranger in my own town.” The best work on here though is when Gary lets his guitar do all the work on the instrumental slow blues title track – “Deja Blues.” The tension builds and reaches what you think is the peak at each chorus only to be taken to another level with another solo and then finally releases you back to the original slow blues jam.

If you’re looking for an album that straddles that fine line of blues and rock without turning into nothing but a guitar shredders excuse to solo than this fits the bill. It’s always interesting to see how artists who are mostly known for a different style of playing interpret the blues. Deja Blues does the blues justice with his pyrotechnic fretboard fluidity and ability to blend them with his rock background without losing the feeling and intent. (by bluesrockreview.com)

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Personnel:
Gary Hoey (guitar, vocals, bass, keyboards)
Matt Scurfield (drums)
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Johnny A. (guitar, slide-guitar on 05.)
Jon Butcher (guitar on 03.)
Frank Hannon (slide-guitar on 08.)
James Montgomery (harmonica on 01.)

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Tracklist:
01. Boss You Around (Hoey) 3.08
02. Boot Mill Blues /Hoey) 3.00
03. Almost Over You (Hoey) 4.44
04. Going Down (Nix) 3.40
05 She’s Walking (Hoey) 3.26
06. Stranger (Hoey) 4.22
07. Born Under A Bad Sign (Jones/Bell) 3.59
08. Got To Believe (Hoey) 3.40
09. Deja Blues (Hoey) 4.22
10. Hold Your Head Up High (Hoey) 4.17

 

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Bakerloo – Same (1969)

FrontCover1And here´s another band from the Midlands:

Bakerloo (previously The Bakerloo Blues Line) was an English heavy blues-rock trio, established by Staffordshire guitarist David “Clem” Clempson, Terry Poole and others in the late 1960s, at the high point of the influence of The Jimi Hendrix Experience and Cream. Although the group was prominent only for around a year (1968-9) and released only one album it played an important part in the history of the genre, especially in view of its members’ subsequent involvement with Colosseum, Humble Pie, May Blitz, Graham Bond, Vinegar Joe, Judas Priest and Uriah Heep.

The Bakerloo Blues Line was formed in February 1968 by David “Clem” Clempson and Terry Poole, who worked with several drummers, including John “Poli” Palmer and John Hinch, before settling with Keith Baker. Under the management of Jim Simpson, they began performing regularly at Henry’s in Birmingham and joined Simpson’s U.K. ‘Big Bear Ffolly’ tour with Earth (the future Black Sabbath), Locomotive and Tea And Symphony. The group appeared as the support act for Led Zeppelin’s debut at London’s famed Marquee Club on 18 October 1968.

TerryPooleAfter simplifying the name to “Bakerloo” the group signed to Harvest Records in mid-1969. Their first release was a single, “Drivin’ Bachwards”/”Once Upon a Time” (HAR 5004) that July. The A-side is an arrangement of the J.S. Bach tune Bourrée in E minor. This record appeared just prior to the release of a similar song, Bourrée, by Jethro Tull, on their second album Stand Up in August 1969.

The single A-side also appeared on their self-titled album in December.

The album Bakerloo (Harvest SHVL 762) was further promoted by the inclusion of “This Worried Feeling,” a slow blues number, on the 1970 Harvest double sampler album Picnic – A Breath of Fresh Air and by sessions for the BBC. The album was produced by Gus Dudgeon. Notable tracks included Last Blues, a heavy rocker, and the album’s closer, Son of Moonshine, a driving metal blues. Other tracks contained “progressive” classical and jazz elements.

While reviews for the debut LP were favorable, the group itself was in disarray at the end of 1969. By the time the record was released, the Clempson-Poole-Baker lineup had decided to go their separate ways. Clempson initially sought to form a new blues-rock power trio, one that reportedly included drummer Cozy Powell, before electing to replace James Litherland as the guitarist in Colosseum. Poole and Baker also moved on, forming May Blitz with Jamie Black on vocals and guitar, although both departed before the band was signed to Vertigo Records.

Poole later played with several other bands, including Graham Bond and Vinegar Joe, while Baker bounced from Supertramp to Uriah Heep. Clempson would continue to achieve greater fame with Colosseum and, in 1971, as Peter Frampton’s replacement in Humble Pie. (by wikipedia)

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One of the first acts signed to the fledgling Harvest label in 1969, Bakerloo were very much a product of their time, a hard-hitting progressive blues band whose predilections ranged from a straightforward assimilation of Willie Dixon to some positively dazzling flashes of instrumental prowess. Guitarist Dave Clempson’s “Big Bear Folly,” the opening cut on the band’s first and only album, is a dazzling Ten Years After-style showcase, while a jazzy variation on a theme of Bach, the aptly titled “Driving Bachwards,” proves that the band wasn’t averse to messing with the classics, either. The quartet’s virtuosity occasionally overwhelms the songs themselves, although there is no shortage of gripping atmosphere. Bassist Terry Poole unleashes an almost sepulchral vocal across the stygian “Last Blues,” a seven-minute marathon that swiftly develops into a full-fledged heavy rocker, punctuated by mood shifts that amount to separate movements — it’s a magnificent piece, rendered with both musical precision and some of producer Gus Dudgeon’s most inspired washes and effects. Impressive, too, is “Son of Moonshine,” a distorted metal effort that clocks in at double that length and combines Clempson’s intensive guitar soloing with a desperately driving blues rhythm. Period comparisons with Cream and early Led Zeppelin really weren’t that far off the mark. Bakerloo were not long for this earth — Clempson quit to join Colosseum shortly after the album’s release; Poole reappeared alongside Graham Bond; drummer Keith Baker departed for Uriah Heep; and Bakerloo itself disappeared off the shelves fairly quickly. (by Dave Thompson)

And here Dave Clempson in his own words about his time with Bakkerloo (taken from an interview with psychedelicbabymag.com, 2012) :

I want to go back in time to your childhood. Where did you grew up and what are perhaps some influences that made an impact on you?

I grew up in Tamworth, in the UK Midlands… my earliest influences were the bands that would be playing in the local working mens’ clubs, where my family would go on Sunday evenings for a drink… I was always very excited about seeing those bands, the “hip” ones would be playing the latest Shadows tunes, and I especially loved to see and hear the electric guitars they had – electric guitars weren’t so common around that area in those days! The best band was called The Wanderers, and the guitarist had a white Stratocaster – I would just sit there gazing at that!

Was Bakerloo your first band or were you in any other bands?

Vipers.jpgMy first band was formed with friends at school, we were called “The Vipers”, and we played a lot of gigs at the working men’s clubs I just mentioned

Let’s talk about Bakerloo. How did you guys came together to form this powerful trio?

A local guy called David Mason asked me to join his band, which was called “The Pinch”, and which had a drummer called John Hinch – Mason wasn’t the world’s best bass player and he was soon replaced by a local boy called Terry Poole! John left the band soon after, and then Terry and I began a long quest to find the drummer of our dreams; we got through quite a few including Pete York and Poli Palmer, before we found Keith Baker, who was just what we’d been looking for – a drummer with a great rock feel and attitude but also the chops to play more adventurous stuff!

Harvest Records signed you up and in 1969 you released a single and your selftitled LP. I would like if you could share some of the strongest memories from recording and producing this LP?

The main memory is that it was my first real experience of recording, and there was a lot to learn! It was the first production by Gus Dudgeon, who had engineered some of my favourite albums, including the legendary Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton.

What gear did you guys use and in what studio did you record?

It was recorded in Trident studios in London, I played my ’58 Les Paul goldtop through a Laney stack.

Why did you choose the name? Did it have a deeper meaning for you or was it just a coincidence?

Our manager came up with the name when he was travelling on the Bakerloo line on London’t underground – it didn’t have any special meaning, it just sounded cool!

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Tell us about concerts. Where did Bakerloo play and with who?

After John Peel heard us play in Birmingham we appeared on his radio show, which was incredibly influential and the only chance to hear good music on the BBC! Soon after that we were booked by all the best blues clubs around the UK, such as the Roundhouse and the Marquee, where we supported Led Zeppelin on their first UK date!

What happened next. I know you joined Colosseum and after that you were in Humble Pie. How did that happened and what are some memories from playing in this two great bands?

Bakerloo supported Colosseum at a gig at Cambidge University, and when Bakerloo split up soon after Jon Hiseman called me and asked me to audition for Colosseum – I got the gig! I have a lot of wonderful memories of that time – Bakerloo had mostly just gigged in the UK, but now I started playing all over Europe which was very exciting … ”

And the rest ist history …

This album is still a killer  … listen to “Son Of Moonshine ” in the style of Cream (including “Cat´s Squirrel”) !

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Personnel:
Keith Baker (drums)
Dave ‘Clem’ Clempson (guitar, vocals, harmonica, harpsichord, piano)
Terry Poole (bass, vocals)
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Jerry Salisbury (trumpet on 03.)

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Tracklist:

01. Big Bear Folly (Clempson/Poole) 3.58
02, Bring It On Home (Dixon) 4.18
03. Drivin’ Bachwards (Bach) 2.09
04. Last Blues (Clempson/Poole) 7.06
05. Gang Bang (Clempson/Baker/Poole) 6.18
06. This Worried Feeling (Clempson/Poole) 7.00
07. Son Of Moonshine (Clempson/Poole) 14,55
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08. Once Upon A Time (Clempson/Poole) 3.40
09. This Worried Feeling (alternte take) (Clempson/Poole) 5.45

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Taste (feat. Rory Gallagher) – In Concert (1978)

FrontCover1In 1968 Taste moved to London, with Kennedy as the band’s manager. The band rapidly made an impression on the UK music scene. One highlight was a short July 7th performance at the Woburn Abbey Festival. Taste also recorded tracks for the ‘Top Gear’ music show, which can be found on a bootleg called ‘London Invasion’.

Damery and Kitteringham were replaced at the manager’s behest, with Richard McCracken (bass) and John Wilson (drums). Like Taste’s prior members, the technically proficient McCracken and Wilson also met on the showband scene, and in 1967 formed a short-lived four-piece blues-rock band called ‘Cheese’, that was also generating attention in the UK, but promptly decided to throw their lot in with Gallagher circa August 1968. (New) Taste would continue to build on the reputation inherited, and a contract with the Polydor label would soon follow.

In Concert (attributed to ‘Taste featuring Rory Gallagher’) (1978) – is an early Marquee Club, London concert, of good quality, recorded on the 25th of October 1968, two months after the transition to the MKII line-up. (by hifipig.com)

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Taste was one of the best blues-rock trios ever … you can call it high energy blues-rock …

Listen to this album (“Blister On The Moon”) and you´ll know why Taste was a real highlight in the history of rock music and of course the start for Rory Gallagher as a solo artist.

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Personnel:
Rory Gallagher (guitar, vocals)
Richard McCracken (bass)
John Wilson (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Medley: (16.06)
01.1. Movin’ On (Gallagher)
01.2. Pontiac Blues (Gallagher)
01.3. Baby, Please Don’t Go (Traditional)
02. Blister On The Moon (Gallagher) 3.51
03. Sugar Mama  (Traditional) 7.29
04. First Time I Met The Blues (Traditional)
05. Catfish (Traditional) 9.27

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Chicken Shack – Unlucky Boy (1973)

LPFrontCover1Unlucky Boy is the sixth studio album by the blues band, Chicken Shack, released in 1973

Originally released in 1973, but reissued with two extra  in 1994, Chicken Shack’s Unlucky Boy finds guitarist/vocalist/songwriter and band founder Stan Webb in fine form. Only drummer Paul Hancox remains from the uneven Imagination Lady, and indeed the horn-oriented approach here is much different than the plodding Led Zeppelin-isms of the previous disc. Webb contributes six originals, and even though they are derivative of Savoy Brown (a band he joined for the Boogie Brothers album just a year later), his approach here is much more subtle and controlled than on his last effort.

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Very rare factory sample discs

Chris Mercer’s saxes, often double tracked to sound like a horn section, bring a tough R&B to the mix, and drummer Hancox is a controlled powerhouse. Webb also reigns in his impulse to overextend guitar solos so prevalent on Imagination Lady, whipping off tight, controlled leads instead.

Articel1973_02Producer Neil Slaven contributes honest, witty, and often self-deprecating liner notes that help explain why two of these songs suffer from poor mixes (basically, he had consumed various substances and couldn’t salvage the songs after the fact). Strings on “As Time Goes Passing By,” (also included in a shorter single version) are a nice touch and bring a bit of class to the proceedings while maintaining the R&B slant of the disc. Two unedited studio jams make the cut as “Stan the Man” and the seven-minute “Jammin’ with the Ash,” both featuring pianist Tony Ashton, who really lets loose on the latter.

Things get stripped down for an unusually delicate version of Lonnie Johnson’s “Too Late to Cry” with just strummed guitar and bass. The opening trio of Webb-penned tunes shows some of his best songwriting with the instrumental “Prudence’s Party” a terrific capsule of Webb’s stinging, gritty guitar style. The album sounds dated but harkens back to a particular time in British blues that is charming in its anything goes attitude. That helps make this one of Stan Webb’s more consistent and successful offerings. (by Hal Horowitz)

This is the Masterpiece of Rock and on e of the best Blues-Rock
Album of All Time. Stan Webb, British Halfgod on Guitar in exciting form. (by Dani Rocksaurier)

This album is quite good, nothing more nothing less:

Ah, the wonderful Chicken Shack re-mastered, good news for blues freaks (such as myself)  … Here´s Chicken Shack with their charismatic frontman and lead guitarist Stan Webb. Webb was famous for his live performance, running down the aisles (before the wireless) with a mega long guitar wire, going banana while playing electrifying guitar soli!

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This of course do not apply to the studio albums, which actually didn’t get nowhere near their live performances! This album is quite good, nothing more nothing less, good clean blues tracks! Get their first album or a live session, If you want the Shack on fire!!  (by Tonny Larsen)

Single

Personnel:
Bob Daisley (bass)
Paul Hancox (drums, percussion)
Stan Webb (guitar, vocals)
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Tony Ashton (piano)
Chris Mercer (saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. You Know You Could Be Right (Webb) 3.47
02. Revelation”(Webb) 5.13
03. Prudence’s Party (Webb) 3.13
04. Too Late To Cry (Johnson) 3.09
05. Stan The Man (Webb) 4.25
06. Unlucky Boy (Thornton/Dupree) 2.34
07. As Time Goes Passing By (Webb) 4.46
08. Jammin’ With Ash” (Webb) 7.04
09. He Knows The Rules (McCracklin) 4.05
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10. As Times Goes Passing By (single version) (Webb) 3.32
11. Doctor Brown (Brown) 3.05

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Bob Daisley & Stan Webb

Handwritten track list

A handwritten track list
and letter from Decca stating this was the first test pressing.

Mick Abrahams – All Said And Done (1991)

FrontCover1Mick Abrahams’ return album, “All Said and Done”, is as fine as anything he has ever done. This is an excellent blues album, with fourteen tracks comprised of seven tunes written by Mick (two of which were collaborations with Gordon ‘Mississippi’ Murphy), two new arrangements of traditional pieces, and five covers of older blues pieces.

The pieces written by Mick are quite good, starting with “Road Roller” which opens the album. Then there is the absolutely fantastic “All Tore Down” which is probably my favorite tune that Mick has ever done. Another noteworthy piece is “Dear Jane” which is very similar to “Dear Jill” from his days in Blodwyn Pig. Another great piece is the title song of the album “All Said and Done”, which is one of the two pieces which Gordon Murphy co-wrote.

While Mick’s pieces are very strong, one cannot ignore the cover tunes like “Black Night” by Jessie Mae Robinson, “Let Me Love You Baby” by Willie Dixon, and “I Wonder Who” by Alexis Korner. There are also two new arrangements of classic blues pieces. The first is “Billy The Kid” (originally by Reverend Andrew Jenkins), and the second is an amazing 11+ minute version of “Cat’s Squirrel” (originally by Charles Isaiah Ross) which has become Mick’s signature piece. (Dave_42)

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Personnel:
Mick Abrahams (guitar, vocals)
Bruce Boardman (piano)
Clive Bunker (drums, percussion)
Pete Fensome (bass)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
Dave Lennox (piano)
Gordon Murphy (saxophone)
Nigel Pegrum (drums, percussion)
Andy Pyle (bass)
Jim Rodford (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Road Roller (Abrahams) 3.07
02. Watch Your Step (Parker) 3.51
03. Billy The Kid (Traditional) 3.33
04. Let Me Love You Baby (Dickson) 3.12
05. Black Night (Robinson) 6.24
06. All Tore Down (Abrahams) 5.22
07. Redways Of Milton Keynes (Abrahams) 3.59
08. Long Gone (Murphy/Abrahams) 3.14
09. Rock Me Right (Abrahams) 3.25
10. So Much Trouble (McGhee) 3.25
11. Dear Jane (Abrahams) 4.00
12. I Wonder Who (Korner) 6.46
13. All Said And Done (Murphy/Abrahams) 3.16
14. Cats Squirrel (Traditional) 11.25

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Canned Heat – 70 Concert Recorded Live In Europe (1970)

LPFrontCover1Canned Heat ’70 Concert Recorded Live in Europe is a 1970 live album by Canned Heat. The album is taken from various locations on live concert European tour right before Alan Wilson’s death and is the band’s first officially released live album. (by wikipedia)

This platter captures the 1970 incarnation of Canned Heat with Bob “The Bear” Hite (vocals), Alan “Blind Owl” Wilson (guitar/vocals/harmonica), Larry “The Mole” Taylor (bass), Aldolfo “Fito” de la Parra (drums), and newest addition Harvey Mandel (guitar), who had replaced Henry “Sunflower” Vestine (guitar) in 1969. They headed across the Atlantic in the spring of 1970 on the heels of “Let’s Work Together” — a Wilbert Harrison cover that charted within the Top Five in Europe. That outing yielded the combo’s first concert disc, Live in Europe (1971) — which had been issued almost a year earlier in the U.K. as Canned Heat Concert (Recorded Live in Europe) (1970). These are also among the final recordings to feature Wilson, whose increasing substance abuse and depression would result in an overdose prior to having re-joined the band for another stint in Europe in the fall of the same year.

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Indeed the brooding “Pulling Hair Blues” from this effort is marked not only by some decidedly dark and strung-out contributions, but more subtly, Hite’s tentative introduction of Wilson — indicating he had not been playing for the duration of the set. The Heat’s performance style has shifted from the aggressive rhythm and blues of their earliest sides to a looser and more improvisational technique. The opener, Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup’s “That’s All Right Mama,” is given a greasy mid-tempo groove over Hite’s vocals . Mandel shines as his guitar leads dart in and out of the languid boogie. Although presented as a medley, “Back on the Road” is more or less an inclusive number with only brief lyrical references to “On the Road Again.” Mandel’s sinuous fretwork melds flawlessly with Wilson’s harmonica blows. The powerful rendering of the aforementioned “Let’s Work Together” is a highlight, with Canned Heat in top form as Wilson’s electric slide riffs recall their seminal sound. (by Lindsay Planer)

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Personnel:
Bob Hite (vocals)
Harvey Mandel (guitar)
Fito de la Parra (drums)
Larry Taylor (bass)
Alan Wilson (slide guitar, vocals, harmonica)

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Tracklist:
01. That’s All Right Mama (Crudup) 9.03
02. Bring It On Home (Dixon) 6.18
03. Pulling Hair Blues (Wilson/Taylor) 9.21
04. Medley:
04.1.Back Out On The Road (Hite)
04.2.On The Road Again (Jones/Wilson/Johnson) 6.01
05. London Blues (Wilson) 7.54
06. Let’s Work Together (Harrison) 4.51
07. Goodbye For Now”(de la Parra/Mandel) 3.26

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Rory Gallagher – My Father´s Place (1979)

FrontCover1A class act is exactly what [My Father’s Place] got whenever Rory Gallagher came to town. Rory played at My Father’s Place on several occasions. This bootleg is from his performance there on September 7, 1979 during the American leg of his top priority tour. After doing a successful three-night stand at the Bottom Line that Robert Palmer calls, “creative and inspired,” Rory heads out to the quaint village of Roslyn, named after a Castle in Scotland, and part of what’s called the North Shore Gold Coast of Long Island… It’ll be a show you won’t want to miss.

With Gallagher’s death in 1995 at the age of 47, the world lost an ace guitarist and, for generations after, younger fans will think of Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page and RoryGallagherignore Gallagher when it comes to blues guitarist. This is what Gallagher said in a 1991 interview:

I have respect for Eric Clapton from the early days, but I’m surprised they always link his name with me. Maybe earlier on there might have been more of a comparison, but not at the moment. Clapton seems to be the icon of all guitarists including Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page. I suppose he’s the successful face of what the blues is and I’m probably the guy on the sidelines. He’s working in a different area from me now. And even in the blues field, I cover different blues tangents than Eric does. I work in country blues and even though I do some numbers that are in the B.B. King and Albert King area, I work in a lot of other influences in as well. My blues roots are all over the place, where Eric’s tend to be a little narrower. (shadowplays.com)

Listen to this great bootleg … That´s what I call high energy blues-rock !

What a concert !

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Personnel:
Rory Gallagher (guitar, vocals)
Gerry McAvoy (bass)
Ted McKenna (drums)

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Shinkicker (Gallagher) 3.38
02. Last Of The Independents (Gallagher) 5.41
03. Keychain (Gallagher) 5.53
04. Moonchild (Gallagher) 5.10
05. The Mississippi Sheiks (Gallagher) 5.45
06. I Wonder Who (Morganfield) 7.48
07. Tattoo’d Lady (Gallagher) 5.10
08. Pistol Slapper Blues (Allen) 3.03
08. Too Much Alcohol (Hutto) 3.48

CD 2:
09. Shadow Play (Gallagher) 5.43
10. Bought And Sold (Gallagher) 4.59
11. Walk On Hot Coals (Gallagher) 5.26
12. Messin’ With The Kid (London/Wells) 5.23
13. Bullfrog Blues (Traditional)) 2.51
14. Sea Cruise (Gallagher) 2.59

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