Savoy Brown – Witchy Feelin’ (2017)

FrontCover1.jpgKim Simmonds founded Savoy Brown in October 1965. At 69 he still is Savoy Brown as the band is pretty much Kim Simmonds on guitar and vocals and whoever he has a back-line. Here we have him with Pat DeSalvo on bass and Garnet Grimm on drums doing a great job backing up this 69 year old British master of the blues guitar.

“Why Did You Hoodoo Me” is a nice an above mid-tempo blues rocker where Simmonds demonstrates his prowess on guitar for us. He questions why he’s been cursed by his woman in this slick production. Kim switches things up with ”Livin’ On The Bayou” with a little creole inspired stuff. A Cajun ballad with some pretty and somewhat ethereal guitar. “I Can’t Stop the Blues” has Simmonds growling out the lyrics in a song about loneliness. The guitar work is what this one’s all about- steady handed and cool. The title cut is up next, a cool slow blues with nice guitar picking, and a ghostly bass line and sound. “Guitar Slinger” picks up the tempo a little and gets into what the title says- guitar slinging. “Vintage Man” shuffles and shines nicely as Kin sings about being a vintage sort of guy in Levis, blue suede shoes and listening to his record player as he listens to and plays Jimmy Reed.

The slide comes out for “Standing In A Doorway.” Slow blues with voice and slide in a melancholy repartee, nicely done. “Memphis Blues” gives us a driving beat and some big guitar and some more slide, but this time it’s greasy and slick. “Can’t Find Paradise” is a big, blues rock anthem sort of piece with some more slide work.

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Simmonds guitar cries and wails in “Thunder, Lightning and Rain.” It’s a big cut with lots of guitar that goes on for nearly 8 minutes of 6 string soling to a steady bass and drum beat. The CD closes to “Close to Midnight,” a sultry and thoughtful instrumental of Simmonds showing us why he’s highly regard as a guitar man.

If you love Savoy Brown and Kim Simmonds then you’ll be spinning this CD a lot because this is right up your alley. Simmonds shows us he’s still got what it takes. The guitar is not overdone, but it’s big and impressively done. It’s a really enjoyable set of new songs all penned by Kim. (Steve Jones)

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Personnel:
Garnet Grimm (drums)
Pat DeSalvo (bass)
Kim Simmonds (guitar, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Why Did You Hoodoo Me 5:15
02. Livin’ On The Bayou 6.01
03. I Can’t Stop The Blues 5.27
04. Witchy Feelin’ 4.38
05. Guitar Slinger 3.53
06. Vintage Man 3.08
07. Standing In A Doorway 5.41
08. Memphis Blues 4.14
09. Can’t Find Paradise 4.30
10. Thunder, Lighting & Rain 7.56
11. Close To Midnight 4.08

All songs written by Kim Simmonds

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More from Savoy Brown:

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Stan Webb’s Chicken Shack – Live In Germany ’75 (2015)

FrontCover1.jpgAlthough he is best known for his lengthy career in Heavy Metal (including playing bass on – and penning the lyrics and co-writing the music for – some of Ozzy Osbourne’s most recognizable songs), bassist Bob Daisley is a bona fide Blues lover. Forty years ago, Daisley indulged his love for this music as a member of Chicken Shack, one of the most beloved Blues acts in the world. Earlier this year, he released Live In Germany ’75, a CD recording of a Chicken Shack lineup completed by founding member Stan Webb on vocals/guitar, guitarist Robbie Blunt and drummer Bob Clouter. And man is it killer.

With only nine songs in 78 minutes, it’s clear that jamming is at the heart of this recording. From a driving nine-minute take on Willie Dixon’s “Homework” to the rock-solid shuffle of their nearly eight-minute cover of Sonny Thompson’s “I’m Tore Down,” Chicken Shack bring these Blues staples into new and exciting worlds. With Live In Germany ’75, you get a sonic snapshot of four musicians truly enjoying themselves on stage.

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Naturally, Stan Webb’s fiery playing gets better and better with each listen. A true master of the guitar, Webb is in his perfect habitat on Live In Germany ’75, using the stage to explore his instrument in ways simply not possible in a studio setting. And when this combines with Blunt’s formidable skills, the results (such as in the band’s interpretation of Don Nix’s “Going Down” and Robert Johnson’s “Dust My Broom”) are otherworldly.

Not surprisingly, the band’s ability to handle real Blues rubs off on their own material, especially on the Webb/Blunt number “Rain On My Window Pane” and the Webb/Daisley/Blunt-written “Crying Again.” The epitome of authenticity, Chicken Shack’s originals effortlessly hold their own against the Blues standards explored throughout the set. The band on this CD is absolutely the real thing.

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While every moment of Live In Germany ’75 offers high-caliber sounds, the 20-minute “Poor Boy” is the release’s undisputed masterpiece. Originally a five minute tune on Chicken Shack’s 1972 album Imagination Lady, the Webb composition reaches transcendental heights on the German stage, encompassing Blues, Heavy Rock, Funk and some truly awe-inspiring dynamics. (Check out the quiet jam that breaks out around the 5:40 mark.)

With a lineup comprised of players who would later end up working with the likes of Rainbow (Daisley) and Robert Plant (Blunt), it comes as little surprise that there is a heaviness to Live In Germany ’75 that easily puts the band in the same Hard Rock league as their mid ’70s touring mates in Deep Purple. If you’re a Metal fan interested in exploring the genre’s Bluesy roots, this is an album not to miss.

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Limited to only 1,000 copies, Live In Germany ’75 is a perfect introduction to the onstage magic of Chicken Shack and an intriguing glimpse into one of the many fascinating eras to define Bob Daisley’s long-running career. Get it while you still can. (joelgausten.com)
By the mid 70s Stan Webb,one of a celebrated trio of 60s English blues guitar players,was the only one still dusting his broom onstage.With Clapton expensively suited and evermore soporific, Peter Green out of the business entirely,pursued by tabloid lowlifes and other demons,only Stan The Man still trod the boards in true blue shoes. Shifting public taste meant he’d often now appear on undercards of egocentric ‘prog’ bands,yet he still retained a grassroots following across Europe, especially in West Germany where his song ‘Poor Boy’ raised many a stein of pilsner.

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After Christine (McVie) had moved on,Chicken Shack featured Stan’s underrated vocals.During a half-century career (yes, that does merit a round of applause) he would cut many records with many different bandmates…all creditable and listenable, but something special has been captured here, delivering one of the most red blooded English blues albums for many a year.
The featured mid 70s lineup gels with a chemistry that cannot be scripted. The ‘Three Bobs’ as tagged here, craft irresistible launchpads for spirited takes on such chestnuts as ‘Tore Down’ and ‘Have You Ever Loved a Woman’. Fifty seconds into the opener, ‘Homework’ that trademark vibrato leaps from the right hand channel with blistering immediacy, whisking you off on a seventy eight minute two guitar sleighride…maybe ‘Poor Boy’ noodles on a bit, but that’s a minor carp, for this is a magnificently energetic and noisy blues gig from an age before the 12-bar format became synonymous with 53 year old accountants decaffing down to East Grinstead to ‘get their Quornbone boiled’. Without passion and feeling white blues often defaults to the turgid play-by-numbers dullardry of trad-jazz…no such issues with this puppy. (Peter Nicholas Zear)

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Personnel:
Robbie Blunt (guitar, slide-guitar)
Bob Clouter (drums)
Bob Daisley
Stan Webb (guitar, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Homework (Dixon) 9.26
02. Have You Ever Loved A Woman? (Myles) 10.20
03. I’m Tore Down (Thompson) 7.37
04. Rain On My Window Pane (Webb/Blunt) 4.17
05. Delilah (Webb/Daisley/Blunt) 5.18
06. Poor Boy (Webb) 20.26
07. Crying Again (Webb/Daisley/Blunt) 6.02
08. Dust My Broom (Johnson) 8.22
09. Going Down (Nix) 6.33

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I recorded this gig 40 years, so this has been sitting in my archive since 1975. I’m pleased to be able to share it and air it. This show epitomises Chicken Shack at the time – raw Blues, Rhythm and Blues and a bit of Funk thrown in. It was my second stint with Stan Webb, I’d been with the Shack from early 1972 until mid ’73, when I left to join Mungo Jerry, which didn’t quite satisfy my lust for real Blues, hence my return to Stan. On this show Stan and I are joined by the aptly named Bob Clouter on drums and Robbie Blunt on slide guitar. Bob Daisley.jpgRobbie went on to be Robert Plant’s guitarist in the early ’80s after Led Zeppelin became defunct. Stan was a legend, and is still highly regarded by many of his Blues peers. This lineup, to me, was one of the best, we’d been gigging a lot, our musical communication was almost telepathic. Stan and the ‘three Bobs’ were on tour with Deep Purple and an American band called Elf. Their lead singer, Ronnie James Dio, and I ended up in a band called Rainbow two years later with Deep Purple’s discontented lead guitarist, Ritchie Blackmore. During our time touring with Deep Purple in March 1975, we did some shows on our own in small theatres and clubs; this is a recording of one of them. In those days bands used to jam on songs when they played live, so this is typical of how we played the basic structure of a song then improvised and had fun with it; I’m very proud of how we sound on this. At the end of our show the tape ran out, but only the tail-end of the last song was lost. So until that point comes, sit back, relax and enjoy; these are ‘those days’… (Bob Daisley)

 

More from Chicken Shack:

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Ten Years After – Cap Ferrat Sessions 1972 (2017)

FrontCover1.jpgTo coincide with the Ten Years After’s eponymous debut release in 1967 Chrysalis Records presents a 50th Anniversary 10 CD Box Set. in 2007. This limited edition set includes a CD of previously unreleased material.

This set, limited to 1,500 copies worldwide, contains LPs which have been remastered from the original 1/4″ production master tapes along with the bonus disc entitled “The CapFerrat Sessions”, which consists of never heard before recordings from 1972, newly mixed by acclaimed record producer Chris Kimsey.

Continues Ric, “The box includes nine studio albums and a bonus CD that features the previously unreleased live album ‘The Cap Ferrat Sessions’.

Originally recorded in 1972 in the South of France using The Rolling Stones Mobile recording truck, the session tracks were gathering dust until now. I remember we recorded the live tracks in a villa in Cap Ferrat, South of France. Each of the instruments were recorded in a different room – drums in the ballroom. Between Chris Kimsey, our recording engineer and I, we managed to get one of the best drum sounds on any Ten Years After recording. Natural ambience from the villa’s acoustics helped tremendously. The session tracks were originally planned for the ‘Rock N Roll Music To The World’ album, but due to vinyl restrictions of the time, the tracks were not included in the final album release. More details are on the sleeve notes written for us by Chris Kimsey, who kindly agreed to mix the tracks for this boxed set release 45 years after they were recorded. This is a must-have collection for any avid Ten Years After fan, and any new fans that want to soak up the band’s recorded history.”

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Ten Years After stormed the stages of rock, they created a sensation that stunned audiences and quickly won them a coveted place among the pantheon of great British groups. Alvin Lee – one of the most charismatic and admired guitar players to emerge from the British blues boom of the era and deservedly ranked alongside his contemporaries Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page and Jimi Hendrix – headed a powerful team of talented musicians, Leo Lyons, Chick Churchill and Ric Lee.

During an intense seven-year period, they embarked on marathon tours, conquering America, enjoying success round the world, whilst also unleashing a succession of ground breaking albums. Their 1967 debut “Ten Years After”was swiftly followed by pioneering live album “Undead” (1968) through the critically acclaimed “A Space In Time”(1971),featuring one of their finest songs ‘‘I’d Love To Change The World”, which is very apt in today’s world, ending with 1974’s ‘Positive Vibrations’.

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“The Cap Ferrat Sessions” came as a result of a discovery by Alvin Lee’s wife, who found a box of recordings deep in the vaults of the studio in their house they shared in Spain. They originate from the “Rock N Roll Music To The World” album sessions, which were recorded at a seaside villa in Cap Ferrat, South of France and Olympic Studios in London. Chrysalis Records turned to world renowned producer Chris Kimsey (whose credits include the Rolling Stones, Bad Company, and Peter Frampton), who recorded and engineered the original sessions, to mix these tracks for the first time.

Revisiting the tapes, some 45 years later Kimsey added, “Alvin and the band were incredibly creative and abundant during this period. These re-discovered recordings were not rough demos, not rehearsals, but completed masters that did not make the album due to the time limitations of vinyl at the time. So these gems were left off. Mixing this in 2017 I began to study the parts, the playing, the response of each musician. It was amazing! It is what all great recordings are made of.“

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For avid collectors and fans of the band, the legendary Cap Ferrat sessions will have a special appeal and will be an essential addition to their collection. This is a big deal for classic rock lovers and aficionados all over the world. (by bluesmagazine.nl)

Great album! Sounds really really good and clear. The songs are classic TYA bluesrock and it is beyond me how they didn’t make it onto the R&MttW album to be honest. (by Jeffrey81)

100% agree. It’s great to have some fresh early period TYA. Glad this wasn’t just lost to history. The green vinyl and cover art are cool too. Recommended to any TYA or Alvin fans.  (by Stuckcake)

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Personnel:
Chick Churchill (keyboards)
Alvin Lee (guitar, vocals)
Ric Lee (drums)
Leo Lyons (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Look At Yourself (A.Lee) 4.21
02. Running Around (A.Lee) 5.33
03. Holy Shit (A.Lee) 2.59
04. There’s A Feeling (A.Lee) 3.30
05. I Hear You Calling My Name (A.Lee) 11.12
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06. I’m Writing You A Letter (A, Lee) 6.58
07. There’s A Feeling (A. Lee) 4.44
08. Rock & Roll Music To The World (A. Lee) 4.12
09. Slow Blues In C (Live in Frankfurt,January 1973) (A.Lee) 8.14
10. Spoonful (live) (Dixon) 7.41
11. I’m Going Home (live) 9.48

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Arc Angels – Same (1992)

FrontCover1.jpgArc Angels were a blues rock band formed in Austin, Texas in the early 1990s. The band was composed of guitarist and singers Doyle Bramhall II and Charlie Sexton and two former members of Stevie Ray Vaughan’s band Double Trouble, drummer Chris Layton and bassist Tommy Shannon. The ‘Arc’ in the band’s name came from the Austin Rehearsal Complex where the band first started jamming.

Their 1992 debut album, Arc Angels, met with critical approval and reached No. 127 on the Billboard chart. Arc Angels made their network television debut on the NBC show Late Night with David Letterman on June 9, 1992, performing “Living In A Dream”. They performed on the show again on January 6, 1993, this time playing “Too Many Ways to Fall”.

Bramhall’s heroin addiction and internal friction caused the breakup of the band in 1993. The Arc Angels broke up in October of that year, concluding their run with a series of farewell concerts at Austin’s Backyard outdoor venue. Beginning in 2002, the Arc Angels reunited for occasional live performances.

In recent years, Bramhall has played guitar in Eric Clapton’s band and toured with Roger Waters. Charlie Sexton has toured with Bob Dylan. Meanwhile, Layton and Shannon have recorded three albums with the Texas soul quintet Storyville. They have also backed such artists as Buddy Guy, Kenny Wayne Shepherd and John Mayer.

ArcAngels.jpgIn March 2009, the members of Arc Angels, minus Shannon, announced that they would be reuniting, releasing a live album and DVD of concert footage/audio taken during 2005, touring extensively and beginning work on their second album. The album/DVD “Living in a Dream” was released in 2009, containing live renditions of previously released Arc Angels songs, new songs performed live and three new studio tracks. The launch of their tour was at Austin’s annual South by Southwest Festival. Although the band never officially broke up again, members pursued solo projects and there have been no talks about future Arc Angels releases or concerts to this date. In 2014 while on stage Bramhall referred to the Arc Angels as “this band I was in”[5] further cementing their demise.

Arc Angels is the self-titled debut album by Arc Angels, released in 1992. (by wikipedia)

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There are one-hit wonders throughout the history of music, but very few one-album wonders like the Arc Angels. After the death of blues-rock guitar hero Stevie Ray Vaughan, fellow singing guitarists, Texans, and Vaughan devotees Doyle Bramhall II and Charlie Sexton formed the quartet with Vaughan’s rhythm section of bassist Tommy Shannon and drummer Chris Layton.

Their 1992 debut release would also be their swan song, but the self-titled album would prove to be one of the best rock/pop/blues recordings of the decade as well. The opening “Living in a Dream” is the only tune Sexton and Bramhall II co-composed, and is perhaps the closest that the Arc Angels come to re-creating Vaughan’s signature sound. “Paradise Cafe” is one of a handful of tracks Sexton co-wrote with pop composer Tonio K., but he and Bramhall II engage in some ZZ Top-like call-and-response vocals, and Bramhall II’s Vaughan dedication, “Sent by Angels,” features some of the album’s most impassioned singing. Funky tunes like “Sweet Nadine,” “Good Time,” and “Carry Me On” lighten the mood, and Shannon, Layton, and guest keyboardist Ian McLagan play brilliantly throughout in setting up the singing guitarists.

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The spirit of Vaughan permeates the recording, from the production of Little Steven to the liner notes (“Dedicated to our friend, Stevie Ray Vaughan. We miss you”), yet never sounds forced, purposeful, or contrived. Alas, the final two songs — the rocking “Shape I’m In” and epic “Too Many Ways to Fall” — sport titles that point toward the Arc Angels being a Vaughan-like comet rather than a future veteran group. Sexton’s solo recording career had started as a teenager; Bramhall II and his father Doyle Bramhall were friends of Vaughan’s (the elder Bramhall even composing and co-composing tunes with the guitar giant). But the two frontmen who complemented each other so well nonetheless couldn’t blend their egos as easily. Arc Angels stands as testimony that a band needn’t have a long career to have a lasting legacy. (by Bill Meredith)

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Personnel:
Doyle Bramhall II (guitar, vocals)
Chris Layton (drums)
Charlie Sexton (guitar, vocals)
Tommy Shannon (bass)
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Ian McLagan (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Living In A Dream (Bramhall II/Sexton) 4.53
02. Paradise Cafe (Sexton/Tonio K) 5.14
03. Sent By Angels (Bramhall II) 5.44
04. Sweet Nadine (Sexton/Tonio K) 4.31
05. Good Time (Bramhall II/Piazza) 4.47
06. See What Tomorrow Brings (Bramhall II) 6.27
07. Always Believed In You (Sexton/(Tonio K) 4.54
08. The Famous Jane (Sexton/Tonio K) 4.31
09. Spanish Moon (Bramhall II/Sexton/Layton) 5.48
10. Carry Me On (Doyle Bramhall II) 4.08
11. Shape I’m In (Bramhall II/Sexton/Benno) 4.07
12. Too Many Ways To Fall (Layton/Shannon/Sexton/Tonio K) 5.52

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A screenshot from their website:

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Southern Lightning – Down The Road (1986)

FrontCover1.jpgI found only a few informations about this fantastic Blues-Rock band from Australia …

They was formed in die mid 80´s and play for two or three weeks … 2 albums and two singles.

The band was led by Dave Hogan, one of the finest Aussie blues singers.

After leaving Southern Lightning he was in another finde band, called “The Paramount Trio” … and he´s still active in Australia … .

Dave Hogan, still resident in Melbourne, blows a mean harp for pre-war blues style outfit The Paramount Trio, while also playing in Southern Lightning, and releasing records with both bands to acclaim in Australia. He recently formed Blues Hangover with original Pretty Things bass player John Stax. (by audioculture.co.nz)

But here we can hear him with one of his first bands … and if love and like this good damn ol´ fucking blues.rock … then you should listen …

This entry is dedicated ot all these more or less unknown groups, who played this music.

And you´ll find two sons of Robert Johnson. e should not forget, that these songs were written in 1936/1973 … and they are still alive and well … Unbelieveable !

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Personnel:
Louie Black (drums)
Nik Guselev (bass)
Dave Hogan (vocals, harmonica)
Manny Seddon (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. I Ain’t Superstitious (Dixon) 3.22
02. Down The Road  (Hogan/Guselev/Seddon) 4.43
03. Muddy Waters Blues (Barton/Hogan/Guselev/Seddon) 8.07
04. Shame Shame Shame (McCrackin/Geddins) 3.35
05. Stones In My Passway (Johnson)
06. Love Shock (Willis) 4.30
07. Blues For Breakfast (Harrington) 6.10
08. I Believe (Dust My Broom) (Robert Johnson) 4.52

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Jeff Healey – Evil Blues (1993)

FrontCover1.jpgNorman Jeffrey “Jeff” Healey (March 25, 1966 – March 2, 2008) was a Canadian jazz and blues-rock vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter who attained musical and personal popularity, particularly in the 1980s and 1990s. He hit Number 5 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart with “Angel Eyes” and reached the Top 10 in Canada with the songs “I Think I Love You Too Much” and “How Long Can a Man Be Strong”.

Born in Toronto, Ontario, Healey was raised in the city’s west end. He was adopted as an infant; his adoptive father was a firefighter. When he was almost one year old, Healey lost his sight to retinoblastoma, a rare cancer of the eyes. His eyes had to be surgically removed, and he was given ocular prostheses.

Healey began playing guitar when he was three, developing his unique style of playing the instrument flat on his lap. At age 9 his musical talents were showcased in an interview on the TVOntario children’s programme Cucumber. When he was 15,[2] Jeff Healey formed the band Blue Direction, a four-piece that primarily played bar-band cover tunes and featured bassist Jeremy Littler, drummer Graydon Chapman, and a schoolmate, Rob Quail on second guitar. This band played various local clubs in Toronto, including the Colonial Tavern.

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Healey began hosting a jazz and blues show on radio station CIUT-FM where he became known for playing from his massive collection of vintage 78 rpm gramophone records.[3]

Shortly thereafter he was introduced to two musicians, bassist Joe Rockman and drummer Tom Stephen, with whom he formed a trio, The Jeff Healey Band. This band made their first public appearance at the Birds Nest, located upstairs at Chicago’s Diner on Queen Street West in Toronto. They received a write-up in Toronto’s NOW magazine, and soon were playing almost nightly in local clubs, such as Grossman’s Tavern and the famed blues club Albert’s Hall (where Jeff Healey was discovered by guitarists Stevie Ray Vaughan and Albert Collins).

After being signed to Arista Records in 1988, the band released the album See the Light, which appeared on the RPM Top 100 chart in 1989.[4] It featuring the hit single “Angel Eyes” and the song “Hideaway”, which was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance. While the band was recording See the Light, they were also filming (and recording for the soundtrack of) the Patrick Swayze film Road House. Healey had numerous acting scenes in the movie with Swayze, as his band was the house cover band for the bar featured in the movie. In 1990, the band won the Juno Award for Canadian Entertainer of the Year. The albums Hell to Pay and Feel This gave Healey 10 charting singles in Canada between 1990 and 1994, including a cover of The Beatles’ JeffHealey03.jpg“While My Guitar Gently Weeps” which featured George Harrison and Jeff Lynne on backing vocals and acoustic guitar.

By the release of the 2000 album Get Me Some, Healey began to concentrate his talent in a different musical direction closer to his heart, the appreciation for another original American music form, jazz.

He went on to release three CDs of music of traditional American jazz from the 1920s and 1930s. He had been sitting in with these types of bands around Toronto since the beginning of his music career. Though known primarily as a guitarist, Healey also played trumpet during live performances. His main jazz group for touring and recording being Jeff Healey’s Jazz Wizards.

Healey was an avid record collector and amassed a collection of well over 30,000 78 rpm records. Starting in 1990 he hosted a radio program of very early jazz on CIUT at the University of Toronto with Colin Bray. Later he went national on CBC Radio’s program entitled My Kind of Jazz, in which he played records from his vast vintage jazz collection. He moved the show two years later to Jazz FM – CJRT; as a part of ongoing celebrations for what would have been Healey’s 50th birthday in 2016, the latter program began to air in repeats Wednesdays 9pm on jazz.fm.

For many years, Healey toured throughout North America and Europe and performed at his club, “Healey’s” on Bathurst Street in Toronto, where he played with his blues band on Thursday nights and also with his jazz group on Saturday afternoons. The club moved to a bigger location at 56 Blue Jays Way and was rechristened “Jeff Healey’s Roadhouse.” Though he had lent his name to the club and often played there, Jeff Healey did not own or manage the bar. (The name came from the 1989 film, Road House, in which Healey appeared.) At the time of his death, he had been planning to perform a series of shows in the United Kingdom, Germany, and the Netherlands with his other band, the “Jeff Healey Blues Band” (aka the “Healey’s House Band”) in April 2008.

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Over the years, Healey toured and sat in with many well-known performers, including The Allman Brothers, Bonnie Raitt, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Buddy Guy, BB King, ZZ Top, Steve Lukather, Eric Clapton and many more. In 2006, Healey appeared on Deep Purple vocalist Ian Gillan’s CD/DVD Gillan’s Inn.

Healey discovered and helped develop the careers of other musical artists, including Terra Hazelton and Amanda Marshall.

In early 2009, Healey’s album Mess of Blues won in The 8th Annual Independent Music Awards for Best Blues Album.

In 2009, Healey was inducted into the Terry Fox Hall of Fame.

In June 2011, Woodford Park in Toronto was renamed Jeff Healey Park in his honour.

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In 2014 Healey was inducted into Canada’s Walk of Fame. In September 2016, Jeff Healey was inducted into the Mississauga Music Walk of Fame. In March 2016 the posthumous album Heal My Soul was released, followed by the companion album Holding On in December of the same year. Both records were compiled from unreleased recordings by Roger Costa. The 12 track Heal My Soul featured six covers and a number of collaborations with Marti Frederiksen, Arnold Lanni and Stevie Salas. The 15 track Holding On album contains ten live tracks recorded in 1999 at the Rockefeller Music Hall in Norway and five studio tracks.

On January 11, 2007, Healey underwent surgery to remove metastatic tissue from both lungs. In the previous 18 months, he had two sarcomas removed from his legs. On March 2, 2008, Healey died of sarcoma in his home town of Toronto at age 41. Healey’s death came a month before the release of Mess of Blues, which was his first rock/blues album in eight years.
Healey married Krista Miller in 1992; they had a daughter and were divorced in 1998. He married Cristie Hall in 2003 and had a son with her. (by wikipedia)

And here´s another pretty good bootleg, recorded live at the Pistoia Blues Festival Pistoia (Italy) – July 4, 1993.

Listen and you´know why Jeff Healey was one of the finest guitar player in the last century

A hell of a record ! And we hear fantastic background vocals, too !

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Personnel:
Jeff Healey (guitar, vocals)
Joe Rockman (bass, background vocals)
Washington Savage (keyboards)
Tom Stephen (drums)
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background vocals:
Mischke & Chouckoo

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Tracklist:
01. Evil Hand Here To Stay (Healey&Rockman/Stephen) 6.39
02. Announcment 0.39
03. Confidence Man (Hiatt) 3.37
04. It Could All Get Blown Away (Goldberg/Goffin) 5.26
05. Lost In Your Eyes (Petty)
06. While My Guitar Gently Weeps (Harrison) 4.55
07. Heart Of An Angel (Holmes) 6.02
08. Angel Eyes (Hiatt/Koller) 6.04
09. Roadhouse Blues (Densmore/Krieger/Manzarek/Morrison) 5.43
10. See The Light (Healey)
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11. Evil Blues (uncut edition) 1.00.42

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Norman Jeffrey “Jeff” Healey (March 25, 1966 – March 2, 2008)

Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble – Live At Carnegie Hall (1997)

FrontCover1.jpgLive at Carnegie Hall is the ninth album (and third live album) by American blues rock band Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble, released by Epic Records in July 1997. The album consists of live selections from their sold-out October 4, 1984 benefit concert at Carnegie Hall for the T.J. Martell Foundation. Backed by a ten-piece big band for the second half of the event, Vaughan had celebrated his thirtieth birthday the night before, and called the concert his “best birthday ever, forever”. The band’s double-set performance, which included several blues and R&B standards, was highly successful, receiving mostly positive reviews from music critics.

Initially ranked as the top blues album of 1997, Live at Carnegie Hall peaked at number 40 on the Billboard 200, where it spent twelve weeks on the chart. The album was S.T.W01.jpgultimately certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) after selling over half a million units. Guests on the album include Vaughan’s brother Jimmie Vaughan (guitar), Dr. John (keyboards), George Rains (drums) and the Roomful of Blues horn section, along with vocalist Angela Strehli. Related to the album, two outtakes from the concert were released on the SRV box set in November 2000.

The album charted at #40 on the Billboard 200, and was the #1 blues album for eight weeks. Entertainment Weekly said that his “blistering fretwork is so technically formidable that it should awe even the most unflappable aficionados.” Stephen Holden from The New York Times described the concert itself as “a stomping roadhouse.” (by wikipedia)

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Live at Carnegie Hall captures Stevie Ray Vaughan on the supporting tour for his second album, 1984’s Couldn’t Stand the Weather. The Carnegie Hall concert was a special show, since it was the only time Vaughan and Double Trouble added the brass section from Roomful of Blues to augment their sound; in addition, the concert featured guest appearances from Stevie’s brother Jimmie and Dr. John. There might have been more musicians than usual on-stage, but Stevie Ray remains the center of attention, and he is in prime form here, tearing through a selection of his best-known songs which generally sound tougher in concert than they do in the studio. It’s the best live Stevie Ray record yet released. (by Thom Owens)

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Personnel:
Chris Layton (drums)
Tommy Shannon (bass)
Stevie Ray Vaughan (guitar, vocals)
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Porky Cohen (trombone)
Bob Enos (trumpet)
Dr. John (keyboards)
Doug James (saxophone)
Rich Lataille (saxophone)
Greg Piccolo (saxophone)
George Rains (drums)
Angela Strehli (vocals on 10.)
Jimmie Vaughan (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Scuttle Buttin’ (S.R.Vaughan) 2.43
02. Testify (R.Isley/K.Isley, Jr./R.Isley) 5.20
03. Love Struck Baby (S.R.Vaughan) 3.05
04. Honey Bee (S.R.Vaughan) 3.05
05. Cold Shot (Kindred/Clark) 4.45
06. Letter To My Girlfriend (Jones) 3.08
07. Dirty Pool (Bramhall/Vaughan) 6.40
08. Pride And Joy (S.R.Vaughan) 4.48
09. The Things That I Used To Do (Jones) 5.26
10. C.O.D. (Gooden) 5.32
11. Iced Over (aka “Collins’ Shuffle”) (Collins/S.R.Vaughan) 5.11
12. Lenny (S.R.Vaughan) 7.14
13. Rude Mood (S.R.Vaughan) 2.22

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Stephen Ray Vaughan (October 3, 1954 – August 27, 1990)