Fats Domino – Rock And Rollin’ (1956)

FrontCover1Fats Domino, the New Orleans rhythm and blues singer whose hits include Blueberry Hill and Ain’t That a Shame, has died aged 89 of natural causes.

Domino, born in 1928 and one of nine siblings, left school at 14 to take on work in a bedspring factory – but went on to sell over 110m records in a career that took off in the mid-1950s, having learned piano on an upright a cousin left in his New Orleans family home.

As his name suggests, he was frank about his 200lb frame. In his first recorded song, The Fat Man (1949), he sang that despite (or perhaps because of) his size, “all the girls, they love me, ’cause I know my way around” – it became a million-seller. With his distinctive gelled and flattened hairstyle, he would sometimes play the piano standing up, slamming his body against it to push it across the stage in time with the music.

He became one of the first black performers to feature on pop music television shows, appearing alongside the likes of Buddy Holly and the Everly Brothers. But as rock’n’roll gave way to the guitar pop of the Beatles and others in the 1960s, American tastes changed, and his popularity started to dwindle. He didn’t chase fashion, however. “I refused to change,” he once said. “I had to stick to my own style that I’ve always used or it just wouldn’t be me.”

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His style was of rolling waltz-time ballads and pounding uptempo numbers, and the best known of his songs is perhaps Blueberry Hill, later selected for the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry which recognises songs worthy of preservation. Originally written in 1940 and recorded by Louis Armstrong, Domino’s seductively smooth version became the most famous; even Vladimir Putin covered it at a charity dinner in 2010.

Domino also was one of the first ever inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and, in 1998, the first rock’n’roll musician to be awarded the National Medal for the Arts.

He lived in New Orleans all his life, and was badly affected by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 – he had to be rescued by boat along with his family, losing three pianos and dozens of gold and platinum records. But he would occasionally still appear in the city’s blues clubs right up until 2007. He and his wife Rosemary, who died in 2008, brought up eight children together.

His friend David Lind described him as “warm, fun-loving, spiritual, creative and Fats&Davehumble. You don’t get more New Orleans than that.”

Various stars have already paid tribute to him. LL Cool J said on Twitter, “I found my thrill on Blueberry Hill… that line inspired me to dream,” Kid Rock called him “a true American treasure”, while songwriter Damien Jurado wrote: “There would have been no rock n’ roll, Jamaican ska, or rocksteady, had it not been for the major influence of Fats Domino.” Brian Wilson, Stephen King, Samuel L Jackson and Harry Connick Jr have also tweeted their respects. (by Ben Beaumont-Thomas; The Guardian)

And here´s his second LP from The Fifties … Come on, baby … Let the good times roll … including a great boogie piano (“Fat’s Frenzy”) and hot saxophone solos (“Second Line Jump”) and of course some sentimental ballads (“My Heart Is In Your Hands”) … that´s what I like !

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Personnel:
Fats Domino (piano, vocals)
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a bunch of unknon studio musicians

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Tracklist:
01. My Blue Heaven (Whiting/Donaldson) 2.10
02. Swanee River Hop (Traditional) 2.53
03. Second Line Jump (Bartholomew/Domino) 2.39
04. Goodbye (Bartholomew/Domino) 2.20
05. Careless Love (Koenig/Williams/Handy) 2.22
06. I Love Her (Bartholomew/Domino) 2.11
07. I’m In Love Again (Bartholomew/Domino) 1.56
08. When My Dreamboat Comes Home (Friend/Franklin) 2.20
09. Are You Going My Way (Bartholomew/Domino) 2.47
10. If You Need Me (Bartholomew/Domino) 2.08
11. My Heart Is In Your Hands (Bartholomew/Domino) 2.46
12. Fat’s Frenzy (Bartholomew/Domino) 2.31

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Jerry Lewis – Just Sings (1956)

FrontCover1Jerry Lewis, the comedian and filmmaker who was adored by many, disdained by others, but unquestionably a defining figure of American entertainment in the 20th century, died on Sunday morning at his home in Las Vegas. He was 91.

His death was confirmed by his publicist, Candi Cazau.

Mr. Lewis knew success in movies, on television, in nightclubs, on the Broadway stage and in the university lecture hall. His career had its ups and downs, but when it was at its zenith there were few stars any bigger. And he got there remarkably quickly.

Barely out of his teens, he shot to fame shortly after World War II with a nightclub act in which the rakish, imperturbable Dean Martin crooned and the skinny, hyperactive Mr. Lewis capered around the stage, a dangerously volatile id to Mr. Martin’s supremely relaxed ego.

After his break with Mr. Martin in 1956, Mr. Lewis went on to a successful solo career, eventually writing, producing and directing many of his own films. (by www.nytimes.com)

And the rest is history !

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And here´s one of his early albums from the Fifties …

This album climbed the charts to number three in 1956. His Jolson-like renditions of standards surprised everyone, especially those who had only heard him mugging shamelessly on his earlier Capitol recordings with and without sidekick Dean Martin; when “Rockabye Your Baby With a Dixie Melody” became a Top Ten single from the album, it suddenly made the general public view this comic in a whole new light. This reissue also features five bonus tracks, a pair of singles from his second album session, and some interesting false starts to “Rockabye.” Although Lewis’ style is pretty over-the-top, this is still one interesting chapter to a career that has lasted longer than most legit singers.  (by Cub Koda)

Buddy Bregman

Personnel:
Jerry Lewis (vocals)
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Buddy Bregman Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. Come Rain Or Come Shine (Arlen/Mercer) 2.48
02. Shine On Your Shoes (Dietz/Schwartz) 2.13
03. How Long Has This Been Going On (G.Gershwin/I.Gerschwin) 3.42
04. I’ve Got The World On A String (Arlen/Koehler) 2.10
05. Rock-A-Bye Your Baby With A Dixie Melody (Schwartz/Young/Lewis) 2.38
06. Bye Bye Baby (Styne/Robin) 2.29
07. I’m Sitting On Top Of The World (Young/Henderson/Lewis) 1.40
08. Get Happy (Arlen/Koehler) 2.53
09. By My Self (Dietz/Schwartz) 3.16
10. Back In Your Own Back Yard (Jolson/Rose/Dreyer) 2.49
11. Sometime’s I’m Happy (Caesar/Youmans) 2.13
12. Birth Of The Blues (Henderson/DeSylva/Brown) 3.18

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Gerald „Jerry“ Lewis (* 16. März 1926 als Joseph Levitch in Newark, New Jersey; † 20. August 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada)

RIP

And … thanks a lot for all the fun you gave to so much people …. 

Sergei Prokofiev – Peter And The Wolf (Herbert von Karajan – narrated by Peter Ustinov) (1959)

FrontCover1Peter and the Wolf, Op. 67, a ‘symphonic fairy tale for children’, is a musical composition written by Sergei Prokofiev in 1936. The narrator tells a children’s story, while the orchestra illustrates it. It is Prokofiev’s most frequently performed work, and one of the most frequently performed works in the entire classical repertoire. It has been recorded many times.

In 1936, Sergei Prokofiev was commissioned by Natalya Sats, the director of the Central Children’s Theatre in Moscow, to write a musical symphony for children. Sats and Prokofiev had become acquainted after he visited her theatre with his sons several times. The intent was to introduce children to the individual instruments of the orchestra. The first draft of the libretto was about a Young Pioneer (the Soviet version of a Boy Scout) called Peter who rights a wrong by challenging an adult. (This was a common theme in propaganda aimed at children in the USSR at the time.) However, Prokofiev was dissatisfied with the rhyming text produced by Antonina Sakonskaya, a then popular children’s author. Prokofiev wrote a new version where Peter captures a wolf. As well as promoting desired Pioneer virtues such as vigilance, bravery and resourcefulness, the plot illustrates Soviet themes such as the stubbornness of the un-Bolshevik older generation (the grandfather) and the triumph of Man (Peter) taming Nature (the wolf).

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Prokofiev produced a version for the piano in under a week, finishing it on April 15. The orchestration was finished on April 24. The work debuted at a children’s concert in the main hall of the Moscow Conservatory with the Moscow Philharmonic on 2 May 1936. However, Sats was ill and the substitute narrator inexperienced, and the performance failed to attract much attention.[1][3][4][5] Later that month a much more successful performance with Sats narrating was given at the Moscow Pioneers Palace. The American premiere took place in March 1938, with Prokofiev himself conducting the Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall, Boston with Richard Hale narrating. By that time Sats was serving a sentence in the gulag, where she was sent after her lover Marshal Mikhail Tukhachevsky was shot in June 1937.

Peter, a Young Pioneer, lives at his grandfather’s home in a forest clearing. One day, Peter goes out into the clearing, leaving the garden gate open, and the duck that lives in the yard takes the opportunity to go swimming in a pond nearby. The duck starts arguing with a little bird (“What kind of bird are you if you can’t fly?” – “What kind of bird are you if you can’t swim?”). Peter’s pet cat stalks them quietly, and the bird—warned by Peter—flies to safety in a tall tree while the duck swims to safety in the middle of the pond.

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Peter’s grandfather scolds him for being outside in the meadow alone (“Suppose a wolf came out of the forest?”), and, when he defies him, saying: “Boys like me are not afraid of wolves”, his grandfather takes him back into the house and locks the gate. Soon afterwards “a big, grey wolf” does indeed come out of the forest. The cat quickly climbs into a tree, but the duck, who has jumped out of the pond, is chased, overtaken, and swallowed by the wolf.

IllustrationPeter fetches a rope and climbs over the garden wall into the tree. He asks the bird to fly around the wolf’s head to distract it, while he lowers a noose and catches the wolf by its tail. The wolf struggles to get free, but Peter ties the rope to the tree and the noose only gets tighter.

Some hunters, who have been tracking the wolf, come out of the forest ready to shoot, but Peter gets them to help him take the wolf to a zoo in a victory parade (the piece was first performed for an audience of Young Pioneers during May Day celebrations) that includes himself, the bird, the hunters leading the wolf, the cat, and grumpy grumbling Grandfather (“What if Peter hadn’t caught the wolf? What then?”)

In the story’s ending, the listener is told: “If you listen very carefully, you’ll hear the duck quacking inside the wolf’s belly, because the wolf in his hurry had swallowed her alive.”
Performance directions

Prokofiev produced detailed performance notes in both English and Russian for Peter and the Wolf. According to the English version:

Each character of this tale is represented by a corresponding instrument in the orchestra: the bird by a flute, the duck by an oboe, the cat by a clarinet playing staccato in a low register, the grandfather by a bassoon, the wolf by three horns, Peter by the string quartet, the shooting of the hunters by the kettle drums and bass drum. Before an orchestral performance it is desirable to show these instruments to the children and to play on them the corresponding leitmotivs. Thereby, the children learn to distinguish the sonorities of the instruments during the performance of this tale. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a nive version with the great Peter Ustinov as narrator and Herbert von Karajan as the conductor of The Philharmonia Orchestra.

What a nicy musical fairy tale !

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Personnel:
Peter Ustinov (narrator)
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The Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by Herbert von Karajan

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Tracklist:
01. Peter And The Wolf (Prokofiev) (Part 1) 14.23
02. Peter And The Wolf (Prokofiev) (Part 2) 14.34
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03. Toy Symphony (Haydn) 11.01

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Miles Davis – `Round About Midnight (1957)

frontcover1‘Round About Midnight is an album by jazz musician Miles Davis. It was his debut on Columbia Records, and was originally released in March 1957 (CL 949). The album took its name from the Thelonious Monk song “‘Round Midnight”. Recording sessions took place at Columbia Studio D on October 26, 1955, and at Columbia’s 30th Street Studio on June 5 and September 10, 1956.

Although it had a lukewarm reception upon its release, ‘Round About Midnight has since been regarded by critics as a masterpiece of the hard bop genre and one of the greatest jazz albums of all time.

At the Newport Jazz Festival in 1955, Davis performed the song “‘Round Midnight” as part of an all-star jam session, with the song’s composer Thelonious Monk, along with Connie Kay and Percy Heath of the Modern Jazz Quartet, Zoot Sims, and Gerry Mulligan. Davis’s solo received an extremely positive reception from many jazz fans, and critics. It was viewed as a significant comeback and indication of a healthy, drug-free Davis (he had in fact been free from heroin addiction for well over a year). Davis’ response to this performance was typically laconic: “What are they talking about? I just played the way I always play.”[5] George Avakian of Columbia Records was in the audience, and his brother Aram persuaded him that he ought to sign Davis to the label.[6] Davis was eventually signed to Columbia Records, and was able to form his famous “first great quintet” with John Coltrane on saxophone. ‘Round About Midnight was to be his first album for his new label.

Davis was still under contract to Prestige Records, but had an agreement that he could record material for Columbia to release after the expiration of his Prestige contract. The recording dates for the album were at Columbia Records’ studios; the first session was on October 26, 1955, at Studio D, during which the track “Ah-Leu-Cha” was recorded along with three other numbers that did not appear on the album. This is the first studio recording of the quintet. The remainder of the album was recorded during sessions on June 5, 1956 (“Dear Old Stockholm”, “Bye Bye Blackbird” and “Tadd’s Delight”) and September 10, 1956 (“All of You” and the titular “‘Round Midnight”) at Columbia’s 30th Street Studio. During the same period, the Miles Davis Quintet was also recording sessions to fulfill its contract with Prestige. (by wikipedia)

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Given that ‘Round About Midnight was Miles Davis’ debut Columbia recording, it was both a beginning and an ending. Certainly the beginning of his recording career with the label that issued most if not all of his important recordings; and the recording debut of an exciting new band that had within its ranks Philly Joe Jones, Paul Chambers, pianist Red Garland, and an all but unknown tenor player named John Coltrane. The title track was chosen because of its unique rendition with a muted trumpet, and debuted at the Newport Jazz Festival the summer before to a thunderous reception. The date was also an ending of sorts because by the time of the album’s release, Davis had already broken up the band, which re-formed with Cannonball Adderley a year later as a sextet, but it was a tense year.

Musically, this sound is as unusual and as beautiful as it was when issued in 1956. Davis had already led the charge through two changes in jazz — both cool jazz and hard bop — and was beginning to move in another direction here that wouldn’t be defined for another two years. Besides the obvious lyrical and harmonic beauty of “Round About Midnight” that is arguably its definitive version even over Monk’s own, there are the edges of Charlie Parker’s “Au Leu-Cha” with its Bluesology leaping from every chord change in Red Garland’s left hand. Coltrane’s solo here too is notable for its stark contrast to Davis’ own: he chooses an angular tack where he finds the heart of the mode and plays a melody in harmonic counterpoint to the changes but never sounds outside. Cole Porter’s “All of You” has Davis quoting from Louis Armstrong’s “Basin Street Blues” in his solo that takes out the tune, and Coltrane has never respected a melody so much.

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But it’s in “Bye-Bye Blackbird” that we get to hear the band gel as a unit, beginning with Davis playing through the melody, muted and sweet, slightly flatted out until he reaches the harmony on the refrain and begins his solo on a high note. Garland is doing more than comping in the background; he’s slipping chord shapes into those interval cracks and shifting them as the rhythm section keeps “soft time.” When Coltrane moves in for his break, rather than Davis’ spare method, he smatters notes quickly all though the melodic body of the tune and Garland has to compensate harmonically, moving the mode and tempo up a notch until his own solo can bring it back down again. Which he does with a gorgeous all-blues read of the tune utilizing first one hand and then both hands to create fat harmonic chords to bring Davis back in to close it out. It’s breathtaking how seamless it all is. There’s little else to say except that ‘Round About Midnight is among the most essential of Davis’ Columbia recordings. (by Thom Jurek)

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Miles Davis with french actress Jeanne Moreau in 1957

Personnel:
Paul Chambers (bass)
John Coltrane (saxophone)
Miles Davis (trumpet)
Red Garland (piano)
Philly Joe Jones (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. ‘Round Midnight (Monk/Hanighen/Williams) 5.58
02. Ah-Leu-Cha (Parker) 5.53
03. All Of You (Porter) 7.03
04. Bye Bye Blackbird (Dixon/Henderson) 7.57
05. Tadd’s Delight (Dameron) 4.29
06. Dear Old Stockholm (Traditional/Getz) 7.52
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07. Two Bass Hit (Lewis/Gillespie) 3.45
08. Little Melonae (McLean) 7.22
09. Budo (Powell/Davis) 4.17
10. Sweet Sue, Just You (Harris/Young) 3.40

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Buddy Rich & His Orchestra – This One’s For Basie (1956)

FrontCover1Drummer Buddy Rich put together an interesting 11-piece group for this tribute to Count Basie. The only Basie alumnus present is trumpeter Harry “Sweets” Edison but the other soloists (trombonist Frank Rosolino and Bob Enevoldsen, Bob Cooper on tenor and pianist Jimmy Rowles) easily fit into the setting. Marty Paich contributed the arrangements, there are plenty of drum solos and the music, if not all that memorable, can easily be enjoyed by straightahead jazz fans. (by Scott Yanow)

The mutual admiration society between Count Basie and Buddy Rich is well documented. Buddy sat in with Basie’s band in the 40’s but tore up the blank check the Count gave him for his services. Basie responded with an inscribed gold watch which I understand he wore all of his life (Source: Traps the Drum Wonder by Mel Torme). Anyway, I guess this was Rich’s way of paying tribute to the Count. Recorded in 1956 in LA, this set of Basie standards is well conceived and executed. The all-star line-up of west coast studio jocks backing Buddy includes Frank Rosolino, Conrad Gozzo, Bob Cooper, Jimmy Rowles, a few others and of course the immortal Harry “Sweets” Edison who was also a Rich favorite. This session swings fairly well and benefits from the contributions of ace arranger Marty Paich. The only drawback – and it’s minor – is that as a studio band these guys are a little too tight. Ordinarily this wouldn’t matter but when you’re doin’ Basie, you gotta be loose! Still highly recommended. (by William Faust)

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Personnel:
Buddy Collette (saxophone, flute)
Bob Cooper (saxophone)
Pete Condoli (trumpet)
Harry Edison (trumpet)
Bob Enevoldsen (trombone, saxophone)
Conrad Gozzo (trumpet)
Joe Mondragon (bass)
Bill Pitman (guitar)
Buddy Rich (drums)
Frank Rosolino (trombone)
Jimmy Rowles (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Blue And Sentimental (Basie/Livingston/David) 4.46
02. Down For Double (Green) 4.05
03. Jump For Me (Basie) 5.41
04. Blues For Basie (Edison) 7.16
05. Jumpin’ At The Woodside (Basie) 6.23
06. Ain’t It The Truth? (Harding/Basie) 2.58
07. Shorty George (Basie) 5.10
08. 9:20 Special (Warren) 4.34

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Sonny Rollins – Tenor Madness (1956)

FrontCover1Tenor Madness is a jazz album by Sonny Rollins. It is most notable for its title track, the only known recording featuring both Rollins and John Coltrane.

Rollins and Coltrane had both been members of groups with Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk in the past. Rollins had had some recent success, and both were emerging as prominent solo tenor saxophone players.Two months prior to the session for Tenor Madness Rollins was working at Rudy Van Gelder’s studio in New Jersey on the album Sonny Rollins Plus 4 with Max Roach and Clifford Brown. And two weeks before, on May 11, Coltrane, Red Garland, Paul Chambers, and Philly Joe Jones, had been recording with Davis at the same studio to fulfill his duties for Prestige, sessions that would later go on to provide material for the albums Workin’, Relaxin’, and Steamin’ with the Miles Davis Quintet.

Although the rhythm section’s “playing here is somewhat less vital than on that session” (with Davis) the historical importance of Tenor Madness lies in the title track. It is the only existing recording with Rollins and Coltrane playing together.

RollinsColtraneThe title track is a twelve-minute duet between Rollins and Coltrane, and the B-flat blues melody has become very well known for Rollins. It is easy to distinguish between the two saxophonists, as Coltrane has a much brighter and more boisterous sound as compared to Rollins’ smoother, “wet-reed” tone. However, as jazz critic Dan Krow said, the two complement each other, and the track does not sound like a competition between the two rising saxophonists.

“Paul’s Pal”, a jumpy swing track, is a Rollins composition, named for bassist Paul Chambers. “When Your Lover Has Gone” is a 1931 composition by Einar Aaron Swan, re-interpreted here as a drum-driven blues track. The Clinton & Debussy ballad “My Reverie” is one of Rollins’ most prominent examples of his lyrical skills from his 1950s’ recordings. “The Most Beautiful Girl in the World”, a tune from the 1935 musical Jumbo, is a Rodgers & Hart composition which goes here from a jazz waltz to a fast-paced 4/4 tune.

SonnyRollins01At a time when he was a member of the legendary Clifford Brown/Max Roach sextet, Sonny Rollins was still the apple fallen not too far from the tree of Miles Davis. Tenor Madness was the recording that, once and for all, established Newk as one of the premier tenor saxophonists, an accolade that in retrospect, has continued through six full decades and gives an indication why a young Rollins was so well liked, as his fluency, whimsical nature, and solid construct of melodies and solos gave him the title of the next Coleman Hawkins or Lester Young of mainstream jazz. With the team of pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones, staples of that era’s Miles Davis combos, Rollins has all the rhythmic ammunition to cut loose, be free, and extrapolate on themes as only he could, and still can. This is most evident on his version of “The Most Beautiful Girl in the World,” started in its normal choppy waltz time, followed by a sax/drums prelude, a drum solo from Jones, and steamed from there on in, a hot 4/4 romp. Garland is particularly outstanding for keeping up the pace, depth and placement on this one. A bluesy version of “When Your Lover Has Gone,” again enlivened by Jones, and the legendary title track with Rollins and John Coltrane trading long solos, and fours with Jones, are tunes that in the mid-’50s defined the parlance “blowing session.” “Paul’s Pal,” in tribute to Chambers, has become a standard in its own right with a bright, memorable melody showing the good humor of Rollins, especially on the second time through, while the saxophonist’s ability to sing vocal like tones through his horn is no better evinced as during the light ballad “My Reverie.” A recording that should stand proudly alongside Saxophone Colossus as some of the best work of Sonny Rollins in his early years, it’s also a testament to the validity, vibrancy, and depth of modern jazz in the post-World War era. It belongs on everybody’s shelf. (by Michael G. Nastos)

RedGarlandPersonnel:
Paul Chambers (bass)
Red Garland (piano)
Philly Joe Jones (drums)
Sonny Rollins (saxophone)
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John Coltrane (xaxophone on 01.)

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01. Tenor Madness (Rollins) 12.16
02. When Your Lover Has Gone (Swan) 6.11
03. Paul’s Pal (Rollins) 5.12
04. My Reverie (Clinton/Debussy) 6.08
05. The Most Beautiful Girl In The World (Rodgers/Hart) 5.37

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Harry Belafonte – Calypso (1956)

FrontCover1This is the album that made Harry Belafonte’s career. Up to this point, calypso had only been a part of Belafonte’s focus in his recordings of folk music styles. But with this landmark album, calypso not only became tattooed to Belafonte permanently; it had a revolutionary effect on folk music in the 1950s and ’60s. The album consists of songs from Trinidad, mostly written by West Indian songwriter Irving Burgie (aka Lord Burgess). Burgie’s two most successful songs are included — “Day O” and “Jamaica Farewell” (which were both hit singles for Belafonte) — as are the evocative ballads “I Do Adore Her” and “Come Back Liza” and what could be the first feminist folk song, “Man Smart (Woman Smarter).” Calypso became the first million-selling album by a single artist, spending an incredible 31 weeks at the top of the Billboard album charts, remaining on the charts for 99 weeks. It triggered a veritable tidal wave of imitators, parodists, and artists wishing to capitalize on its success. Years later, it remains a record of inestimable influence, inspiring many folksingers and groups to perform, most notably the Kingston Trio, which was named for the Jamaican capital. For a decade, just about every folksinger and folk group featured in their repertoire at least one song that was of West Indian origin or one that had a calypso beat. They all can be attributed to this one remarkable album. Despite the success of Calypso, Belafonte refused to be typecast. Resisting the impulse to record an immediate follow-up album, Belafonte instead spaced his calypso albums apart, releasing them at five-year intervals in 1961, 1966, and 1971. (by Cary Ginell)

HarryBelafonte1956Personnel:
Harry Belafonte (vocals)
Frantz Casseus (guitar)
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Millard J. Thomas – guitar on 01., 04., 06. + 07.)
The Norman Luboff Choir (on 08. – 10.)
Tony Scott and His Orchestra (on 02., 03., 05., 08. – 11.)
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Tracklist:
01. Day-O (The Banana Boat Song) (Traditional) 3.02
02. I Do Adore Her (Burgess) 2.48
03. Jamaica Farewell (Burgess) 3.02
04. Will His Love Be Like His Rum? (Attaway/Belafonte) 2.33
05. Dolly Dawn (Burgess) 3.13
06. Star O (Attaway/Belafonte) 2.02
07. The Jack-Ass Song (Burgess/Attaway) 2.52
08. Hosanna (Burgess/Attaway) 2.34
09. Come Back Liza (Burgess/Attaway) 3.03
10. Brown Skin Girl (Span) 2.43
11. Man Smart (Woman Smarter) (Span) 3.31

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