Colosseum – The Collectors Colosseum (1971)

LPFrontCover1Colosseum are an English jazz rock band, mixing blues, rock and jazz-based improvisation. Colin Larkin wrote that “the commercial acceptance of jazz rock in the UK” was mainly due to the band. Between 1975 and 1978 a separate band Colosseum II existed playing progressive rock.

Colosseum, one of the first bands to fuse jazz, rock and blues, were formed in early 1968 by drummer Jon Hiseman with tenor sax player Dick Heckstall-Smith, who had previously worked together in the New Jazz Orchestra and in The Graham Bond Organisation, where Hiseman had replaced Ginger Baker in 1966. They met up again early in 1968 when they both played in John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, during which time they played on the Bare Wires album. Childhood friend Dave Greenslade was quickly recruited on organ, as was bass player Tony Reeves who had also known both Hiseman and Greenslade since being teenage musicians in South East London. The band’s line-up was completed, after lengthy auditions, by Jim Roche on guitar and James Litherland (guitar and vocals), although Roche only recorded one track before departing.

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Their first album, Those Who Are About to Die Salute You, which opened with the Bond composition “Walkin’ in the Park”, was released by the Philips’ Fontana label in early 1969. In March the same year they were invited to take part in Supershow, a two-day filmed jam session, along with Modern Jazz Quartet, Led Zeppelin, Jack Bruce, Roland Kirk Quartet, Eric Clapton, Stephen Stills, and Juicy Lucy.

Colosseum’s second album, later in 1969, was Valentyne Suite, notable as the first release on Philip’s newly launched Vertigo label, established to sign and develop artists that did not fit the main Philips’ brand, and the first label to sign heavy metal pioneers Black Sabbath.

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For the third album, The Grass Is Greener, released only in the United States in 1970, Dave “Clem” Clempson replaced James Litherland. Louis Cennamo then briefly replaced Tony Reeves on bass, but was replaced in turn by Mark Clarke within a month. Then Hiseman recruited vocalist Chris Farlowe to enable Clempson to concentrate on guitar. This lineup had already partly recorded the 1970 album Daughter of Time.

In March 1971, the band recorded concerts at the Big Apple Club in Brighton and at Manchester University. Hiseman was impressed with the atmosphere at the Manchester show, and the band returned five days later for a free concert that was also recorded. The recordings were released as a live double album Colosseum Live in 1971. In October 1971 the original band broke up.

After the band split, Jon Hiseman formed Tempest with bassist Mark Clarke; Dave Greenslade formed Greenslade together with Tony Reeves. Chris Farlowe joined Atomic Rooster; and Dick Heckstall-Smith embarked on a solo career. Clem Clempson joined the hit group Humble Pie.

Hiseman formed another group called Colosseum II in 1975, with a stronger orientation towards jazz-fusion rock, which featured guitarist Gary Moore and Don Airey on keyboards. They released three albums before disbanding in 1978.

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Colosseum reunited on 24 June 1994 at the Freiburg Zelt Musik Festival, with the same line-up as when they split in 1971. On 28 October they played a concert in Cologne at E-Werk which was recorded for a TV Special. Recordings from this show were released in 1995 as a CD and a video, and re-released in 2004 as a DVD. The rejuvenated band then played a lengthy tour of mainly German concerts. A second tour followed in 1997, to promote their new studio album “Bread and Circuses”. They also appeared at major festivals in 1998, 1999 and 2000.

In 2003 they toured on the back of “Tomorrow’s Blues” CD, followed also by gigs in England in 2004. Hiseman’s wife, saxophonist Barbara Thompson, joined the band on various occasions. When Dick Heckstall-Smith died in December 2004 she became a permanent member of the band.

In 2005, there were three memorial concerts for Dick Heckstall-Smith, one in Hamburg Germany and two in England.

On 24 September 2005 they performed in Moscow, followed by more concerts in 2006.

In 2007, the made their first appearance in Japan and returned to play more dates in Germany.

Further tours of Europe were made in 2010.

Jon Hiseman

In October 2010, Jon Hiseman’s biography, Playing the Band – The Musical Life of Jon Hiseman, was published. In November 2012, a Kindle version (with minor re-edits) of Playing the Band was published.[6]

Colosseum played their “Summer 2011” tour of 22 gigs in Germany, Italy, Austria, Finland and Poland. The tour started in June and ended on 20 August in Germany, Rostock, at Bad Doberan “Zappanale” festival. According to the interview of the bandleader Jon Hiseman, Bad Doberan was the last concert of the band. Their second ‘last’ concert was in Poland, Slupsk, at “Legends of Rock” festival on 13 August 2011 and the third ‘last’ concert in Finland, Äänekoski, at “Keitelejazz” festival on the 23 July 2011. These announcements were based on Barbara’s worsening Parkinson’s condition preventing her from playing. However, with the arrival of new medication, her ability to play was renewed, so those announcements proved to be premature and the band continued to record and play until 2015.

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More studio releases followed, as expanded editions of Valentyne Suite and Colosseum Live, and several compilation sets of earlier work. From 2011 to 2014, Colosseum gradually recorded their final album, titled “Time on our Side”, which was eventually released late in 2014, to coincide with their final flurry of dates in Germany and the UK. These included 24 concerts during 2014 in Central Europe, starting 23 October at Steinegg Festival, Collepietra, Italy. Followed by concerts in February 2015 before ending on 28 of that month at the Shepherd’s Bush Empire, London. At all these concerts, Jon Hiseman confirmed from the stage that this tour would be Colosseum’s last.

After 23 years, the band played what Jon referred to as ‘the last hurrah!’ before a packed and very appreciative audience at the Shepherd’s Bush Empire, London on 28 February 2015. Special ‘guest’ was Ana Gracey, the daughter of Jon Hiseman and Barbara Thompson. Together with Chris Farlowe she sang her own composition “Blues to Music”, which was also included on the final Colosseum CD.

Jon HisemanColosseum reunited again after the death of Jon Hiseman to play selected shows in 2020. The line-up is Chris Farlowe, Clem Clempson and Mark Clarke, joined by Kim Nishikawara (sax), Adrian Askew (keys, organ) and Malcolm Mortimore (drums). In August 2021, it was reported that the keyboard position would be filled by Nick Steed. This line-up started touring on the 29th of August in Hamburg at Landhaus Walter to be continued in UK. On April 15 2022, they released their new studio album “Restoration”.

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The Collectors’ Colosseum is a compilation album (with some previously unreleased tracks !) by Colosseum that was released in England in 1971.

Enjoy this excellent music … Colosseum were in these days one of the most imporant Jazz-Rock groups and they are still today eminently important in the history of music ! And they are still active, although their founders, Jon Hiseman and Dick Heckstall-Smith has unfortunately long since died

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Personnel:
Dave Clempson (guitar, vocals on 01., 06. + 08.)
Chris Farlowe (vocals on 01.)
Dave Greenslade (keyboards)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
Jon Hisman (drums, percussion)
James Litherland (guitar, vocal on 02., 03., 04. + 05.)
Tony Reeves (bass)

An Italian re-issue:
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Tracklist:
01. Jumping Off The Sun (originally recorded late in 1969 (1) (Taylor/Tomlin) 3.36
02. Those About To Die (excerpt from their first LP) (Hiseman/Greenslade/Reeves/ Heckstall-Smith) 4.53
03. I Can’t Live Without You (recorded 1968; previously unreleased) (Litherland) 4.18
04. Beware The Ides Of March (from their first LP) (Hiseman/Greenslade/Reeves/ Heckstall-Smith) 5.38
05. Walking In The Park (from their first LP) (Bond) 3.55
06. Bolero (recorded late in 1969; previously unreleased) (Ravel) 5.28
07. Rope Ladder To The Moon (recorded late in 1969; previously unreleased) (Bruce/Brown) 3.20
08. The Grass Is Greener (recorded late in 1969; previously unreleased) (Heckstall-Smith/ Hiseman) 7.33

(1) with Chris Farlowe’s vocals overdubbed over Dave Clempson’s originals. In addition, there are extra guitar overdubs by Clempson.

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Colosseum – Transmissions – Live At The BBC (CD 1 + 2) (2020)

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Colosseum are an English jazz rock band, mixing blues, rock and jazz-based improvisation. Colin Larkin wrote that “the commercial acceptance of jazz rock in the UK” was mainly due to the band. Between 1975 and 1978 a separate band Colosseum II existed playing progressive rock.

Colosseum, one of the first bands to fuse jazz, rock and blues, were formed in early 1968 by drummer Jon Hiseman with tenor sax player Dick Heckstall-Smith, who had previously worked together in the New Jazz Orchestra and in The Graham Bond Organisation, where Hiseman had replaced Ginger Baker in 1966. They met up again early in 1968 when they both played in John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, during which time they played on the Bare Wires album. Childhood friend Dave Greenslade was quickly recruited on organ, as was bass player Tony Reeves who had also known both Hiseman and Greenslade since being teenage musicians in South East London. The band’s line-up was completed, after lengthy auditions, by Jim Roche on guitar and James Litherland (guitar and vocals), although Roche only recorded one track before departing.

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Their first album, Those Who Are About to Die Salute You, which opened with the Bond composition “Walkin’ in the Park”, was released by the Philips’ Fontana label in early 1969. In March the same year they were invited to take part in Supershow, a two-day filmed jam session, along with Modern Jazz Quartet, Led Zeppelin, Jack Bruce, Roland Kirk Quartet, Eric Clapton, Stephen Stills, and Juicy Lucy.

Colosseum’s second album, later in 1969, was Valentyne Suite, notable as the first release on Philip’s newly launched Vertigo label, established to sign and develop artists that did not fit the main Philips’ brand, and the first label to sign heavy metal pioneers Black Sabbath.

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For the third album, The Grass Is Greener, released only in the United States in 1970, Dave “Clem” Clempson replaced James Litherland. Louis Cennamo then briefly replaced Tony Reeves on bass, but was replaced in turn by Mark Clarke within a month. Then Hiseman recruited vocalist Chris Farlowe to enable Clempson to concentrate on guitar. This lineup had already partly recorded the 1970 album Daughter of Time.

In March 1971, the band recorded concerts at the Big Apple Club in Brighton and at Manchester University. Hiseman was impressed with the atmosphere at the Manchester show, and the band returned five days later for a free concert that was also recorded. The recordings were released as a live double album Colosseum Live in 1971. In October 1971 the original band broke up. (wikipedia)

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“This is the BBC Radio 1 Service. We proudly present one of the world’s greatest bands… Colosseum!” Fans tuning into their wireless sets during the great age of progressive rock would have been thrilled to hear the announcer introduce one of their favourite bands about to hit the airwaves. They wouldn’t be disappointed. Few bands played with such power, fire and intensity whether in a club, at a festival or even in the confines of a radio station studio. Led by drumming legend Jon Hiseman, Colosseum was guaranteed to give an exciting performance as soon as the red recording light went on and the engineer gave the thumbs up. Even so, it seemed like a fleeting moment, once the broadcasts were over, never to be heard again. But here is the exciting news.

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Many of the shows when Colosseum roared into epic arrangements like ‘Walking In The Park,’ ‘Daughter Of Time’, ‘Tanglewood ’63’ and ‘Rope Ladder To The Moon’ were captured on tape for posterity, not only by the BBC but by listeners armed with their own home recorders. So now it is Repertoire’s turn to proudly announce the release of an amazing 6CD set Transmissions Live At The BBC featuring shows like John Peel’s ‘Top Gear’ and ‘Sounds Of The 70s’, and comprising some 60 tracks recorded between 1969 and 1971. We hear the earliest version of Colosseum with founder members Jon Hiseman, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Dave Greenslade and Tony Reeves joined by guitarist/vocalist James Litherland. Later classic line-ups include Dave Clempson on guitar with Chris Farlowe (vocals) and Mark Clarke (bass) with guest appearances by Barbara Thompson (sax/flute) and the New Jazz Orchestra. This vast treasure trove of material has been rescued from the BBC and Colosseum archives, along with rare recordings by fans and enthusiasts. It has been painstaking collected, collated, restored and digitalised by the combined forces of historian and archivist Colin Harper, Jon’s daughter Ana Gracey and Repertoire’s own audio genius the mighty Eroc. With liner notes by Repertoire’s Chris Welch including new interviews with Dave Greenslade, Tony Reeves and Chris Farlowe, this promises to be the biggest classic rock album release of the year. So ‘The Machine Demands A Sacrifice’? Here it is! (press release)

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I have just taken delivery of this set & am very impressed. I haven’t listened to a note though – that goes without saying. What I wish to comment on is the packaging. The box is beautifully made & the 6 discs & booklet fit snugly so whole thing takes up a minimum of space (& apart from the actual discs, contains no plastic) so it will easily be stored with other CDs. Would that all CD boxed sets were like this. (The Duckmeister)

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Superb collection of high class radio broadcasts. Brings me back to those fabulous days when I heard them when first broadcast when I was a teenager. Brilliant music. (Bob Mitchell)

Without any doubts: a must for every serious Colosseum collector !

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Personnel:

From Top Gear Januar 1969 to Radio 1 Jazz Workshop July 1969:
Dave Greenslade (organ, vibraphone)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
Jon Hiseman (drums)
James Litherland (guitar, vocals)
Tony Reeves (bass)
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Barbara Thompson (saxophone, flute on Top Gear July 1969)

from Top Gear November 1969 to Sounds of the 70’s April 1970:
Dave Clempson (guitar, vocals)
Dave Greenslade (organ, vibraphone)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
Jon Hiseman (drums)
Tony Reeves (bass)
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Barbara Thompson (saxophone, flute on Top Gear November 1969

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Tracklist:

CD 1:

Top Gear, 19 January 1969:
01. The Road She Walked Before (Heckstall-Smith) 2.51
02. Backwater Blues (Leadbetter) 5.01
03. A Whiter Shade Of Powell (Pale) (Brooker/Bach) 2.46

Symonds On Sunday, 16 March 1969:
04. Walking In The Park (Bond) 3.23
05. Interview with Jon Hiseman 1.00
06.Beware The Ides Of March (Reeves/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith/Litherland/Greenslade) 4.08
07. Plenty Hard Luck (Reeves/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith/Litherland/Greenslade) 2.41

Johnnie Walker, 24 May 1969:
08. Elegy (Reeves/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith/Litherland/Greenslade) 3.04
08. Walking In The Park (Bond) 4.19
10. Butty’s Blues (Reeves/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith/Litherland/Greenslade) 5.59
11. I Can’t Live Without You (Litherland) 4.48

Top Gear, 6 July 1969:
12. Elegy (Reeves/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith/Litherland/Greenslade) 2,51
13. The Grass Is Greener (Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman) 7.25
14. Hiseman’s condensed history of mankind 2.30
15. February’s Valentyne (Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman(Greenslade) 6.18

Symonds On Sunday, 20 July 1969:
16. Elegy (Reeves/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith/Litherland/Greenslade) 3.07
17. The Road She Walked Before (Heckstall-Smith) 2.24
18. Walking In The Park (Bond) 3.41
19. Butty’s Blues (Reeves/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith/Litherland/Greenslade) 3.12

CD 2:

Radio 1 Jazz Workshop, 17 July 1969:
01. Elegy (take 1) (Reeves/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith/Litherland/Greenslade) 3:01
02. I Can’t Live Without You (Litherland) 4.45
03. Walking In The Park (Bond) 4.17
04. Those About To Die (take 1) (Reeves/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith/Litherland/Greenslade) 6.29
05. Butty’s Blues (take 1) (Reeves/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith/Litherland/Greenslade) 6.50
06. Mandarin (Reeves/Greenslade) 6.32
07. The Grass Is Greener (Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman) 2.02

Top Gear, 22 November 1969:
08. Interview with Dick Heckstall-Smith 1.41
09. Lost Angeles (Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith)  8.47
10. Arthur’s Moustache  6.26

Unknown Session late 1969 / early 1970:
11. Jumping Off The Sun (Taylor/Tomlin) 3.29
12. Theme For An Imaginary Western (Bruce/Brown) 3.57
13. Take Me Back To Doomsday (Greenslade/Clempson/Hiseman) 2.32
14 Lost Angeles (partial) (Farlowe/Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith) 1.28
15. Angle 3:52
16. The Machine Demands A Sacrifice (Hiseman) 2.44

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Box front + backcover:
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Coming soon: CD 3 + 4, 5+ 6 + booklet

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Colosseum – Live `71 (2020)

FrontCover1Colosseum was one of the most exciting British rock bands of the 70s and while they made fine studio albums, notably the classic Those Who Are About To Die (1969), it was on the road, playing night after night to devoted fans, that the group led by master drummer Jon Hiseman really came – alive! Mercifully, thanks to skilled recording engineers, many of their best shows were captured on tape. This superb collection of live performances reveals Colosseum blasting at full strength and with extraordinary power and passion. This 3LP set is packed with alternative versions of many of their most iconic songs and arrangements. Keyboard player Dave Greenslade and other past members of the band explain how Colosseum developed its sound and style in extensive liner notes by Repertoire’s Chris Welch, a rock journalist who saw the band from their earliest days onwards. Colosseum was truly great live in 1971. Thanks to this treasure house of high-quality recordings, professionally restored by digital craftsman Eroc, the band comes alive and kicking for us to enjoy 50 years later. (Press release)

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The first thing that strikes you about this new 2CD live album from Colosseum, professionally recorded across several shows in early 1971, is how sensational it sounds. Vibrant, clear, sparkling, dynamic and alive. Mixing/mastering engineer Eroc (one Joachim Ehrig, a pro recording artist in bands and solo, as Eroc, from the 70s to the 90s, now a mastering maestro) has done an astounding job!

It’s a blistering performance, too. For those who don’t know much about Colosseum, their sound is – to my mind – part of a peculiarly British sort of jazz/rock blend, involving the likes of brass, Hammond and vibraphones, that thrived briefly for roughly a year either side of 1970. It’s a sound world that had its origins in the Graham Bond Organisation of the middle 60s – in which Colosseum mainstays Jon Hiseman (drums) and Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxes) both played – was influenced by the absurdist songwriting of Pete Brown with Jack Bruce in Cream, and that was developed by Jack Bruce’s ‘Songs for a Tailor’ (1969) album arrangements (again, featuring both Hiseman and DHS) and his 1971 touring band (which reunited him with Bond), by the Keef Hartley Band (a briefly flourishing drummer-led band with horn section), by Neil Ardley’s New Jazz Orchestra (which collaborated with Colosseum on some live shows), by the first two albums by jazz/rock arranger Michael Gibbs (1970-71) and his live band, and by one or two other acts of that brief period. It wasn’t ‘jazz-rock’ as represented by the likes of Nucleus in Britain or the Mahavishnu Orchestra in the US; rather, it was a kind of progressive rock music with jazz players and influences involved and, in Hartley and Colosseum’s cases, based more around songs than instrumentals.

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If this new 2CD is so sensational, one might ask why it has languished so long in the late Colosseum bandleader Jon Hiseman’s archive, although really that question refers specifically to Disc 1, recorded live at a university in Canterbury on 12 February 1971. Let me explain…

During a British tour in early 1971, Colosseum, with doubtful enthusiasm from their management and label, set about recording shows with the Granada mobile, with the intention of capturing their onstage magic, and a clutch of hitherto unrecorded numbers, on a live album (Jon feeling their three studio albums to that point had lacked something of this). In Jon’s 2010 autobiography ‘Playing the Band’, it is explained that while nobody could by then recall how many shows had been recorded, the first was at Canterbury, the third was at Manchester University on 13 March, there was another at Manchester University on 18 March and the final recording was made at the Big Apple in Brighton on 27 March. Somewhere in between, there had also been a recording made at Bristol. The second show in Manchester – a free gig – was put on because the band had felt the first one was below par, with a ‘huge row’ in the dressing room after, and they were desperate to try and get something good on tape.

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After the Brighton show, their manager, Gerry Bron, pulled the plug on more live recordings and Jon became despondent. However, they all listened again to the first Manchester show at Lansdowne Studios and realised it was much better than they’d reckoned at the time. Thus, five tracks from Manchester on March 13, and one from Bristol (date not given, track not identified) – according to Jon in his book, the only one from a show other than Manchester that they thought was any good – became the June 1971 double LP ‘Colosseum Live’. It would be their last album, bar a compilation of oddities, until reforming in 1994.

In Jon’s book, bar a passing mention, there is no discussion of the Canterbury show. The presumption is that, for whatever reason, it was simply not considered for release and everyone moved on to the next gig recording (and the next…).

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Emails with Eroc reveal that the original multi-track recording from Canterbury was rather weak and needed a lot of work. Clearly, his results with today’s technology would not have been possible in 1971. Indeed, the eventual ‘Colosseum Live’ 2LP that was mixed back in the day, from the first Manchester show, was often thought to be an imperfect, rather gritty presentation, albeit capturing the energy Jon was after (the 2016 Esoteric Records expanded edition of the album, remastered by Ben Wiseman, significantly enhanced the sound). So, one presumes that technical issues rather than any questions about the performance were why the Canterbury show was never considered for release in 1971, and nor for a disc’s worth of further drawings from the well of these 1971 tapes that appeared in 2009 (more of which below).

So, what’s on the new album? Well, in different order, Disc 1 comprises Canterbury versions of five of the six (Manchester) numbers on the 1971 LP – Mike Gibbs’ ‘Tanglewood ‘63’, Jack Bruce’s ‘Rope Ladder to the Moon’, Graham Bond’s ‘Walking in the Park’ and band originals ‘Skellington’ and ‘Lost Angeles’. The 1971 LP’s sixth number* was ‘Stormy Monday’ – famously, an entirely spontaneous encore version (after that dressing room contretemps) of the classic T-Bone Walker blues. It was immediately added to the Colosseum repertoire – but, of course, it had been absent at Canterbury. The sixth number on the Canterbury disc of the new 2CD set is a barnstorming 15-minute ‘The Machine Demands a Sacrifice’ (incorporating Jon’s ‘Time Machine’ drum solo).

(* Note: ‘I Can’t Live Without You’, recorded at the first Manchester show, was added as a seventh track to all CD versions of ‘Colosseum Live’ from 1992–2004; indeed, a 1990 Japanese CD edition of the album remains the only one to NOT feature this extra.)

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Disc 2 of the new 2CD ‘Live ‘71’ comprises five numbers over its 73 minutes (Colosseum specialising in rather long items) that have been released before in two contexts: firstly, as a live disc of previously-unreleased tracks in the 2009 4CD Colosseum box set ‘Morituri Te Salutant’, presumably mixed by Jon Hiseman and certainly mastered by Peter Reynolds; secondly, as the second disc in Esoteric’s 2016 2CD edition of ‘Colosseum Live’, mastered by Ben Wiseman. These are: ‘Rope Ladder’ and ‘Skellington’ from Brighton; ‘I Can’t Live Without You / Time Machine / The Machine Demands a Sacrifice’ from the first Manchester show (the ‘I Can’t Live’ section being the bit added to those 1992-2004 single CD editions of the original live album, mentioned earlier); ‘The Valentyne Suite’ from the second Manchester show; and ‘Stormy Monday’ from Bristol.

Is Eroc’s mastering of the items on this disc better than the previous two outings? I believe it is. Others with more time can do a more comprehensive A/B, but from a few minutes each of two tracks compared between the Esoteric release and the Repertoire one, it’s clear that there is more warmth and depth in Eroc’s mastering without sacrificing any of the presence; Wiseman’s mastering on the Esoteric release is good, but chooses to emphasise the top end, with a slight harshness (albeit plenty of punch). At the very least, Eroc brings something fresh to the tracks on this disc.

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It is Disc 1, however, the 74 minutes of magic from Canterbury, that make this release essential for anyone interested in British progressive rock. To reiterate: the performance is great and the mixing and mastering are sensational. In short, a deftly covered Chris Farlowe fluffed entry into one track aside, it’s better in my view than the released-at-the-time ‘Colosseum Live’, which is itself a classic of the era.

‘Colosseum Live ‘71’ is one of five (!) Colosseum live albums that Repertoire has just released – the others being a ‘best of the bootlegs’, from quality amateur recordings made between 1969–71 at Boston, Montreux, Turku and Rome, and newly mastered (also by Eroc). The first three of these are probably of most interest to fans, in featuring vocalist Chris Farlowe’s predecessors James Litherland and Dave Clempson along with a diversity of material. The Rome 1971 set, with Chris, comprises four numbers familiar from the pro-recorded Canterbury set. Seventies ‘Melody Maker’ personality and uber Colosseum fan Chris Welch contributes notes to all of these releases. (Colin H.

In other words: A masterpiece !

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Personnel:
Mark Clarke (bass, vocals)
Dave ‘Clem’ Clempson (guitar, background vocals)
Chris Farlowe (vocals)
Dave Greenslade (keyboards, vibraphone)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
Jon Hiseman (drums)

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Tracklist:

CD 1:

Live At Canterbury University Of Kent, 1971:
01. Tanglewood ’63 (Gibbs) 13.08
02. Rope Ladder To The Moon (Bruce/Brown) 8.39
03. Walking In The Park (Bond) 8.13
04. Skelington (Clempson/Hiseman) 13.20
05. The Machine Demands A Sacrifice (Brown/Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman/Litherland) 14.58
06. Lost Angeles (Farlowe/Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith) 15.52

CD 2:

Live In Brighton, 1971:
01. Rope Ladder To The Moon (Bruce/Brown) 11.14
02. Skelington (Clempson/Hiseman) 14.17

Live In Manchester, 1971:
03. I Can’t Live Without You (Litherland) / The Time Machine (Hiseman) / The Machine Demands A Sacrifice (Brown/Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman/Litherland) 21.36
04. The Valentyne Suite 21.12
04.1. January’s Search (reenslade/Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman)
04.2. February’s Valentyne (Greenslade/Hiseman)
04.3. The Grass Is Always Greener (Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman)
05. Stormy Monday (Walker) 5.11

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Dick Heckstall-Smith:
(September 26, 1934 – December 17, 2004)

Jon Hiseman:
(June 21, 1944 – June 12, 2018)

Colosseum – Ruisrock Festival, Finland (1970)

FrontCover1The “Ruisrock Festival” which is said to be the oldest festival in the Northern Europe, recorded on August 22, 1970, with the finest soundboard. (The pitch has also been justified.) From now on, it is stable anytime. With no ideal sound quality, you can enjoy plenty of the full picture of the show. (Regretfully The Time Machine will expire at 11:01) It is a pity that the “Valentine Suite” is not included as a set list, but it is a shameful place full of fans satisfying classic songs and it is very attractive It is content. Among the sounds that have the impression that the blues color deeply added at this time is strikingly playing the whole body of the whole body anyhow, anyhow, together with the powerful soulful vocal of Chris, it is an incredible hot ensemble It is spreading. Of course, we are listening to a lot of solo play that undoubtedly demonstrated the power of Dick’s multi-lead. Colosseum itself, live sound source itself is very few (especially 70 years), so this item is really valuable. (I’d like to expect the sound source of the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1969 …) A lot of high-tension super battle that is not ordinary but rough though it is rough. Please fully enjoy the unique and unique performance of the early Colosseum. (giginjapan.com)

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This is another a pretty good Colosseum bootleg from their best period … a must for every serious Colosseum collector.

Should be “remastered” and released commercially and dedicated to the memory of Jon Hiseman. (by muziken)

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Personnel:
Mark Clarke (bass, vocals)
Dave “Clem” Clempson (guitar, vocals)
Chris Farlowe (vocals)
Dave Greenslade (keyboards, vibraphone)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
Jon Hiseman (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Rope Ladder To The Moon (Bruce/Brown) 10.29
02. Time Machine (Hiseman) 10.55
03. Downhill And Shadows (Clempson/Hiseman/Reeves) 12:22
04. Lost Angeles (Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith/Farlowe) 11.29
05. Walking In The Park (Bond) 6.12

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Various Artists – The Vertigo Annual (1970)

FrontCover1.jpgVertigo Records was the late 60s progressive rock arm of the Philips Records empire.

Vertigo Records is a record company, which originated in the United Kingdom. It was a subsidiary of the Philips/Phonogram record label, launched in 1969 to specialise in progressive rock and other non-mainstream musical styles. Today it is operated by Universal Music UK.

Vertigo was the brainchild of Olav Wyper when he was Creative Director at Phonogram. It was launched as a competitor to labels such as Harvest (a prog subsidiary of EMI) and Deram (Decca). It was the home to bands such as Colosseum, Jade Warrior, Affinity, Ben and other bands from ‘the “cutting edge” of the early-’70s British prog-folk-post-psych circuit’. The first Vertigo releases came with a distinctive black and white spiral label, which was replaced with Roger Dean’s spaceship design in 1973.

Vertigo later became the European home to various hard rock bands signed to Mercury in North America, such as Bon Jovi, Rush and Kiss.

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Vertigo is a division of Island Records in the United States and operates as Virgin EMI Records in the UK, which in turn is a frontline music group operation of Universal Music UK. In Germany, Vertigo has merged with Capitol Records and is mainly used for German rock artists. The label’s legacy artists include Metallica (outside the US and Canada), Razorlight, Rush (Europe) and Dire Straits (except the US). More recent signings include The Rapture, The Killers (UK/Ireland), One Night Only, Amy Macdonald, Noisettes and Thee Unstrung 2004-2005 and Kassidy in 2009. Black Sabbath returned to the label in 2013 (including the US and Canada for the first time via sister label Republic) until their dissolution in 2017 although former sister label Sanctuary Records Group acquired international rights to their back catalogue in the interim (the band were last on Vertigo in 1987). (by wikipedia)

And here´s a damn good sampler, the first sampler of the legendary Vertigo Label:

A two-LP label sampler from the nascent Vertigo label — Polygram’s answer to EMI’s Bookprogressive — psychedelic boutique, Harvest. Overall, for a label sampler, this was a better than average double slab of vinyl, with tried-and-true heavy cuts (from Black Sabbath, Uriah Heep, Juicy Lucy, May Blitz) jostling for space with lighter stuff (Magna Carta, Dr. Strangely Strange). Rod Stewart turns up as well, with an early solo outing on “Handbags and Gladrags.” (by Steven McDonald)

The title of this double label sampler leads one to believe that there were plans for an annual release, but Vertigo never got any further than 1970. Contrary to the ‘Heads together’ sampler, this one contains previously released material only and so serves quite succeedingly as an introduction to Vertigo’s miracles.The contents are chosen with taste: almost every track is among the best from the respective album and therefore this sampler comes recommended for anyone who wants to start to explore what the fuzz is all about.Red foliage surely is a favourite of Keef the album designer. This time a naked lady on a dotted hobby-horse fronts the landscape. A small boy dressed in parade uniform plays the drum and looks at her. Quite striking.

The lettering is chosen in accordance to the ‘annual’ idea and could have been taken from any children’s annual of the times.

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Inside the horse’s head is displayed in a coloured negative photograph and also proudly quotes underground magazine ‘it’: Vertigo is the least pretentiously and most happily married of the ‘progressive’ labels to emerge from ‘neath the wings of the large record companies.

One of those indispensable samplers, with so much going for it – label design, musical quality, rare tracks, top audio and alluring cover pics – it has become a collectors item by own merits. One cut each from the sixteen first albums realeased by the label. Most represented here didn’t sell a lot back then and the originals can sometimes be hard to find or afford. I haven’t had or heard all of those so I can’t compare, but get the impression they picked the better or best from each.

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Some compilations have at least one downer regarding track choice or audio. On here I can’t find one thing less than marvelous. From the happy-go-luckys Fairfield Parlour “In My Box” and Magna Carta “Going My Way” over the heavy Sabbath, Juicy Lucy and Uriah Heep cuts to the jazzier Nucleus, Colosseum and May Blitz it’s all tophole.

Vertigo was a highly collectable label . and this sampler is the best way to start with this cult label…

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Tracklist:
01. Colosseum; Elegy (from “Valentyne Suite VO1”) (Litherland) 3.10
02. Rod Stewart: Handbags And Gladrags (from “An Old Raincoat Won’t Ever Let You Down VO4”) (d’Abo) 4.26
03. Jimmy Campbell: Half Baked (from “Half Baked 6360010”) (Campbell) 4.43
04. May Blitz: I Don’t Know (from “May Blitz 6360007”) (Black/Hudson/Newman) 4.50
05. Juicy Lucy: Mississippi Woman (from “Juicy Lucy VO2”) (Hubbart/Campbell/Mercer/ Ellis/Owen/Dobson) 3.49
06. Fairfield Parlour: In My Box (from “From Home To Home 6360001”) (Pumer/Daltrey) 2.00
07. Magna Carta: Goin’ My Way (Road Song) (from “Seasons 6360003”) (Simpson) 2.55
08. Affinity: Three Sisters (from “Affinity 6360004”) (Hoile/Naiff) 5.01
09. Black Sabbath: Behind The Wall Of Sleep (from “Black Sabbath VO6”) (Ward/Butler/ Osbourne/Iommi) 3.41
10. Gracious; Introduction (from “Gracious! 6360002” (Kitcat/Davis) 5.56
11. Cressida: To Play Your Little Game (from “Cressida VO7”) (Heyworth) 3.22
12. Nucleus: Elastic Rock (from “Elastic Rock 6360008”) (Jenkins) 4.06
13. Manfred Mann Chapter Three: One Way Glass (from “Manfred Mann Chapter Three VO3”) (Mann/Thomas) 3.36
14. Bob Downes: No Time Like The Present (from “Electric City 6360005”) (Downes) 3.05
15. Dr. Strangely Strange: Summer Breeze (from “Heavy Petting 6360009”) (Booth) 3.42
16. Uriah Heep: Gypsy (from “…Very ‘Eavy Very ‘Umble… 6360006”) (Byron/Box) 6.57
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17. Catapilla: Changes (from “Changes 6360 074”) (Wilson/Calvert/Meek) 12.05
18. Gravy Train: Think Of Life (from “Gravy Train 6360 023”) (Davenport/Hughes/Barratt /Cordwell/Williams) 5.10
19. Jade Warrior: May Queen (from ” Last Autumn’s Dream 6360 079″) (Havard/ Field/ Duhig) 5.24
20. Mike Absalom: Frightened Of The Dark (from “Mike Absalom 6360 053 “) (Absalom) 3.25
21. Ramases: Life Child (from “Space Hymns 6360 046”) (Godley/GouldmanCreme/ Raphael ) 6.39
22. Patto: Give It All Away (from “Hold Your Fire 6360 032 ) (Patto/Halsall) 4.10

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Colosseum – LiveS – The Reunion Concerts 1994 (1995)

frontcover1LiveS The Reunion Concerts 1994 is a live album by English progressive jazz-rock band Colosseum. It includes two tracks from their reunion concert at the Zelt-Musik-Festival in Freiburg, Germany and six tracks from the second reunion concert at the E-Werk in Cologne, Germany.

In 2003 Live Cologne 1994 was released, which contains the rest of the titles played in Reunion Concerts 1994 in Cologne.

In the same year a DVD with the complete Cologne concert was released under the title The Complete Reunion Concert Cologne 1994 (including a 90-minute documentary The Story of Colosseum).

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Drummer Jon Hiseman seemingly had low expectations for a Colosseum reunion. The group decided to re-form at keyboardist Dave Greenslade’s 50th birthday party, although Hiseman wasn’t sure the timing was right. He was hopeful his German bookers could maybe put together six shows; they swiftly found 30, with Colosseum going on to play over 100 gigs during 1994-1995. And why not? In their three-year lifespan, the group racked up three U.K. Top 20 albums, while simultaneously blowing the socks off of Germany and much of Europe. And coming back together after two decades was, judging by the music here, a lot like coming home. The Reunion Concert Cologne 1994 took place at the E-Werk in Cologne, and was the band’s second gig together. Filmed for German television, it resulted in the Reunion Concerts 1994 live album which was released the following year.

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A video of the gig also hit the shelves, and later a DVD, with this two-disc set completing the package, as the CD features the songs left off the original live album. Those include an exuberant sax-led take on “Those About to Die,” a wild ride through “Skellington,” and a quartet of excellent covers which all featured on the band’s 1971 Colosseum Live album. It was this lineup that let loose that set, and they sound just as good 20-plus years later, with the group eagerly swinging into their legendary “The Valentyne Suite” and other grand numbers from their heyday across the DVD. A splendid show now finally available in its entirety. (by Jo-Ann Greene)

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Considering the band were only in existence for three years they had enormous impact on the progressive and jazz rock scenes, and to hear them again some twenty-two years after they broke up is quite something (even more remarkable is that they are soon to release a new studio album and are touring again!). The band came from many backgrounds, but brought into the rock arena a strong love and understanding for both the blues and jazz.

Jon Hiseman has long been rated as one of the best jazz drummers around; while there can be few sax players in the world that can stay the pace with Dick Heckstall-Smith. Add to that the guitar skills of Clem Clempson and keyboard playing of Dave Greenslade, with the vocals of Chris Farlowe (surely one of our most under-rated singers) and bassist Mark Clarke and here was the 1971 line-up back in full flow.

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Not really a band made for singles or the radio, this is a band that strived on improvisation and building on each other, and so many years later that is still very evident in their performance. Yes, there are loads of solos and long instrumental passages, but the music just sounds right ? created by people with tremendous skill and mastery of their craft but at the same time not being overindulgent (well, not too much). They know when the time is right to bring the rest of the band back in.

A tremendous gig by a band on top form ? Hiseman says that the years apart have meant that they now play better than ever, he could well be right. (by Kev Rowland)

In other words: It was a night, the legends came out to play !

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And I saw Colosseum on their reunion tour through Germany in 1995 … and to be honest … I got tears in my eyes …

After the show I went backstage and could talk a little bit with the musicians and they signed the cover of my CD …

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Personnel:
Mark Clarke (bass, background vocals)
Dave “Clem” Clempson (guitar, background vocals)
Chris Farlowe (vocals)
Dave Greenslade (keyboards, background vocals)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
Jon Hiseman (drums, percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. Those About to Die … (*) (Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman/Reeves)  5.11
02. Elegy (Litherland) 4.24

The Valentyne Suite: (20.41)
03. January’s Search (Greenslade/Hiseman) 5.39
04. February’s Valentyne (Greenslade/Hiseman) 5.16
05. The Grass Is Always Greener (Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman) 9.53

06. Theme For An Imaginary Western (Bruce/Brown) 6.42
07. The Machine Demands Another Sacrifice (Litherland) 2.02
08. Solo Colonia (Hiseman) 12.26
09. Lost Angeles (Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith/Farlowe) 13.29
10. Stormy Monday Blues (*) (Walker) 12.12

* live at Zelt-Musik-Festival, Freiburg, Germany, June 24, 1994.

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This entry is dedicated to:

Dick Heckstall Smith: (26 September 1934 – 17 December 2004)

Jon Hiseman: (21 June 1944 – 12 June 2018)

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Colosseum – Daughter Of Time (1971)

FrontCover1.Daughter of Time is the fourth album by Colosseum, released in 1970. The album remained for five weeks in the UK Albums Chart peaking number 23. Recorded in the midst of an upheaval in the band’s lineup, only one of its eight tracks, “Three Score and Ten, Amen”, features all six of the official band members. (by wikipedia)

A concept album loosely based on man’s fascination and allure for war throughout the ages, Daughter of Time contains all the elements required to create a pure progressive rock album. Joining David Greenslade and Chris Farlowe is Louis Cennamo from Renaissance, who plucks away at the bass guitar with a heavy hand. A multitude of instruments combine to create a brilliant melange of music on every one of the eight songs. Vibrant spurts of trombone, trumpet, and flute are driven to the height of each song, which gives way to some implements of jazz fusion. Rich organ and vibraphone can be heard in behind “Three Score and Ten Amen” and “Take Me Back to Doomsday” adding to the melancholy theme.

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Colossum (with Dave Clempson + Tony Reeves)

Countering this are beautiful string arrangements made up of violin, viola, and cello used effectively to conjure up mood, and doing an excellent job. Even a flügelhorn is blared from time to time on top of the accentuated drums. A spoken word passage from Dick Heckstall-Smith creates an eerie aura, as his voice echoes on about the coming of the apocalypse. Colosseum’s music works extremely well in that it builds suspense and reels the listener into the songs. As far as the lyrics go, they’re stark and foreboding and have a mediaeval taste to them, coinciding with the music perfectly. Each song, all around six minutes in length, should have been longer to let the instruments play out with their illustriousness. Except for the fact that it is a short album, Daughter of Time is a sturdy example of progressive rock. (by Mike DeGagne)

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In other words: this is a classic and timeless album, a must for every serious record collection …

Listen to the great cover version of Jack Bruce´s “Theme For An Imaginary Western” … totally different from the version of Mountain … but what a version … hear Chris Farlowe, hear the drums of Jon Hiseman … and listen to the lyrics of Pete Brown:

When the wagons leave the city
For the forest, and further on
Painted wagons of the morning
Dusty roads where they have gone
Sometimes traveling through the darkness
Met the summer coming home
Fallen faces by the wayside
Looked as if they might have known
Oh the sun was in their eyes
And the desert that dries
In the country towns
Where the laughter sounds

Oh the dancing and the singing
Oh the music when they played
Oh the fires that they started
Oh the girls with no regret
Sometimes they found it
Sometimes they kept it
Often lost it on the way
Fought each other to possess it
Sometimes died in sight of day

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And I got tears in my eyes, when I´m listing to he titel track of this album:

And I saw the…

Daughter to time through the lens of a dream
Reflecting the world as it seems to have been

Riding the night with a net full of stars
Her spirit is truth and her truth is ours

An unbelievable album … a monster album … each track is a classic … including the great drum solo on “The Time Machine”.

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Personnel:
Mark Clarke (bass guitar)
Dave “Clem” Clempson (guitar, vocal on 03.)
Chris Farlowe (vocals)
Dave Greenslade (keyboards, vibes, background vocals)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone, spoken word on 01.)
Jon Hiseman (drums, percussion)
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Louis Cennamo (bass on 02.,03., 04. + 06.)
Tony Reeves (bass on 08.)
Barbara Thompson (flute. saxophone; background vocals on 01. – 04.)

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Tracklist:
01. Three Score And Ten, Amen (Clempson/Greenslade/Hiseman) 5:38
02. Time Lament (Greenslade) 6:13
03. Take Me Back To Doomsday (Clempson/Greenslade/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith 4:25
04. The Daughter Of Time (Dennen/Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith) 3:33
05. Theme For An Imaginary Western (Bruce/Brown) 4:07
06. Bring Out Your Dead (Clempson/Greenslade) 4:20
07. Downhill And Shadows (Clempson/Hiseman/Reeves) 6:13
08. The Time Machine (live) (Hiseman) 8.11

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Colosseum – Valentyne Suite (1969)

frontcover1Valentyne Suite was the second album released by the band Colosseum. It was Vertigo Records’ first album release, and reached number 15 in the UK Albums Chart in 1969.[1]
Though the song “The Kettle” is officially listed as having been written by Dick Heckstall-Smith and Jon Hiseman, a credit which is confirmed by Hiseman’s liner notes for the album, bassist and producer Tony Reeves later claimed that it was written by guitarist and vocalist James Litherland. (by Wikipedia)
One of England’s prime jazz-rock — or, more accurately, rock-jazz — outfits, most of the members of Colossuem had apprenticed in blues bands, and it shows very strongly on some of the material here. Both “The Kettle” and “Butty’s Blues” are essentially tarted-up 12-bar blues, although they work well in a grander context; in the latter case much grander, as a brass ensemble enters for the last part, drowning out everything but the guitar, an indication that this recording is in dire need of remastering. “Elegy” is a fast-paced, minor-key blues that stretches guitarist James Litherland’s vocal abilities. Things do get far more interesting with “The Machine Demands a Sacrifice,” which offers solo opportunities to organist Dave Greenslade and sax player Dick Heckstall-Smith before re-emerging in what can only be called a proto-industrial style, all heavily treated clattering percussion.
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The album’s real joy comes with “The Valentyne Suite,” which takes the band out of their bluesy comfort zone into something closer to prog rock. Bandleader Jon Hiseman is a stalwart throughout, his busy drumming and fills owing far more to jazz than the studied backbeat of rock. Greenslade proves to be a largely unsung hero, his only real solo in the suite something to offer a challenge to vintage Keith Emerson, but with swing. As to criticism, bassist Tony Reeves has very little flow to his playing, which severely hampers a rhythm section that needs to be loose-limbed, and Litherland’s guitar playing is formulaic, which can be fine for rock, but once outside the most straightforward parameters, he seems lost. In retrospect this might not quite the classic it seemed at the time, but it remains listenable, and for much of the time, extremely enjoyable. (by Chris Nickson )
Without any doubts: This is one of the finest jazz-rock albums ever recorded and this is one of my most favourite Albums.
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Live at the Bath Festival, June 28th, 1969
Personnel:
Dave Greenslade (keyboards, vibraphone, background vocal on 03.)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophones, flute)
Jon Hiseman (drums, percussion)
James Litherland (guitar, vocals)
Tony Reeves (bass)

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Neil Ardley (conductor)
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Tracklist:
01. The Kettle (Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman) 6.46
02. Elegy (Litherland) 3.14
03. Butty’s Blues (Litherland) 3.28
04. The Machine Demands A Sacrifice (Litherland, Heckstall-Smith/Brown, Hiseman) 3:55
05. Valentyne Suite Theme One: January’s Search (Greenslade) 6.20
06. Valentyne Suite Theme Two: February’s Valentyne (Greenslade) 6.57
07. Valentyne Suite Theme Three: The Grass is Always Greener (Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman) 3.37
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Colosseum – Those Who Are About To Die (1969)

FrontCover1Those Who Are About to Die Salute You – Morituri Te Salutant is the debut album by Colosseum, released in 1969 by Fontana. It is one of the pioneering albums of jazz fusion. The title is a translation of the Latin phrase morituri te salutant that according to popular belief (but not academic agreement), gladiators addressed to the emperor before the beginning of a gladiatorial match.

The album reached number 15 in the UK Albums Chart.

“Debut” is the very first song Colosseum ever played as a group. Tony Reeves later recalled that “[“Debut”] was actually a phrase that I remembered Mick Taylor playing with John Mayall, and I changed it a bit into a bass line.  And then the band all joined in – this is what happens during rehearsals – so technically you should have everybody’s name in the writing credit, including, I guess, Mick Taylor’s!”

“Mandarin” started from a series of sketches by Dave Greenslade based on a Japanese soft scale. Tony Reeves compiled the sketches into the main theme and arranged the song.

“Beware the Ides of March” borrows a theme of the fugue of “Toccata and Fugue in D minor” by Johann Sebastian Bach (Bach BWV 565). (by wikipedia)

Colosseum’s debut album is a powerful one, unleashing each member’s instrumental prowess at one point while consolidating each talent to form an explosive outpouring of progressive jazz/rock the next. Those Who Are About to Die Salute You is coated with the volatile saxophone playing of Dick Heckstall-Smith, the thunderous keyboard assault of Dave Greenslade, and the bewildering guitar craft of James Litherland. Together,

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Colosseum skitters and glides through brisk musical spectrums of freestyle ]jazz and British blues, sometimes held tightly in place by Greenslade’s Hammond organ, while other times let loose by the brilliancy of the horn and string interplay. Each song sparks its own personality and its very own energy level, giving the band instant notoriety upon the album’s release in 1969. Not only did Colosseum sound different from other jazz fusion bands of the era, but they could easily take the unconventional elements of their style and churn them into palatable and highly significant musical thoroughfares. Some of the more compelling tracks include “Walking in the Park,” led by its powerful trumpet segments, and “Pretty Hard Luck,” which embarks on a stylish blues excursion with colorful keyboard sections on the periphery. “Beware the Ides of March” borrows a page out of J.S. Bach’s notebook and turns his classical poignancy inside out, while “Mandarin” and “Backwater Blues” are created with the perfect jazz and blues friendship in mind, representing Colosseum’s fused sound spotlessly. Best of all, the album never strays from its intensity or its creativity, the very foundation that the band is built on. Their next album, Valentyne Suite, mirrors the same instrumental congruity as Those Who Are About to Die, and is equally entertaining. (by Mike DeGagne)

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Personnel:
Dave Greenslade (keyboards, vibraphone, piano, background vocals on 06.)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
Jon Hiseman (drums)
James Litherland (guitar, vocals)
Tony Reeves (bass)
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Henry Lowther (trumpet on 01.)
Jim Roche (guitar on 07.)

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Tracklist:
01. Walking In The Park (Bond) 3.51
02. Plenty Hard Luck (Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman/Litherland/Reeves) 4.23
03. Mandarin (Reeves/Greenslade) 4.27
04. Debut (Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman/Reeves) 6.20
05. Beware The Ides Of March (Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman/Reeves) 5.34
06. The Road She Walked Before (Heckstall-Smith) 2.39
07. Backwater Blues (Leadbelly) 7.35
08. Those About To Die (Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith/Hiseman/Reeves) 4.49

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