Russ Ballard – The Fire Still Burns (1985)

FrontCover1Russell Glyn Ballard (born 31 October 1945) is an English singer, songwriter and musician.

Originally coming to prominence as the lead singer and guitarist for the band Argent, Ballard became known by the late 1970s as a songwriter and producer. His compositions “New York Groove”, “You Can Do Magic”, “Since You Been Gone”, “Liar”, “Winning”, “I Know There’s Something Going On”, “So You Win Again” and “God Gave Rock and Roll to You” were hits for other artists during the 1970s and 1980s. He also scored several minor hits under his own name in the early and mid-1980s. (wikipedia)

And here´s his 5th solo album:

This man literally has written hundreds of great single hits for other people, but never really succeeded as a solo artist, although he is a more than decent singer and instrumentalist.

The Fire Still Burns brought him close to the breakthrough in 1985. It is a typical AOR rock record with some very nice songs; for example “Hey Bernadette” and the title track, which both sound so similar, that it is almost the same, whether Russ sings “Hey Bernadette …” or “The fire still burns …”. (by Communique)

Singles

In my book, making a rock album that stands out from the pack is quite an accomplishment, and here Ballard at least partially succeeds. At their best, his songs offer a new take on old subjects, as when he somehow combines the supernatural and heartbreak in one song. At their worst, they are at least polished, with the kind of upbeat, lightly-driving feel that Tony Carey’s music of this period shares. (by szarka Mar )

This album didn’t turn me into a Russ Ballard fanatic; but at least it wasn’t a waste of money.
Fine follow up to the previous album. Same style, same standard. Quite why EMI America never released a UK single to take advantage of the interest achieved with “Voices” I’ll never know. “Searching” would have been a natural follow-up, being in the same vein. Also “Your Time Is Gonna Come” had considerable commercial potential. (by UKDave)

LPBackCover

Personnel:
Russ Ballard (vocals, keyboards, guitar, bass, electronic drums)
Mo Foster (bass)
Stuart Elliott (drums)
Peter Van Hooke (electronic drums)
Mike Richardson (drums)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Once A Rebel 5.33
02. The Omen 4.30
03. Hey Bernadette 5.48
04. Searching 6.10
05. Time 1.53
06. Your Time Is Gonna Come 4.39
07. Dream On 5.02
08. The Fire Still Burns 5.37

All songs written by Russ Ballard

LabelB1

*
**

RussBallard01

Robert Plant – Little By Little (EP – Collectors Edition) (1985)

FrontCover1Robert Anthony Plant CBE (born 20 August 1948) is an English singer, songwriter and musician, best known as the lead singer and lyricist of the rock band Led Zeppelin.

Plant enjoyed great success with Led Zeppelin from the late 1960s to the end of the 1970s. He developed a compelling image as the charismatic rock-and-roll front man, similar to contemporaries such as Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones, Roger Daltrey of the Who, Jim Morrison of the Doors, and Freddie Mercury of Queen. With his mane of long blond hair and powerful, bare-chested appearance, Plant helped to create the “god of rock and roll” or “rock god” archetype. Although Led Zeppelin dissolved in 1980, Plant occasionally collaborated with Jimmy Page on various projects through this period, including forming a short-lived all-star group with Page and Jeff Beck in 1984, called the Honeydrippers. They released an album called The Honeydrippers: Volume One, and the band had a No. 3 hit with a remake of Phil Phillips’ tune “Sea of Love”, plus a follow-up hit with a cover of Roy Brown’s “Rockin’ at Midnight”.

RobertPlant01A powerful and wide vocal range (particularly evident in his high-registered vocals) has given Plant a successful singing career spanning over 50 years. In 2008, Rolling Stone editors ranked him number 15 on their list of the 100 best singers of all time. In 2011, Rolling Stone readers ranked Plant the greatest of all lead singers. In 2006, Hit Parader magazine named Plant the “Greatest Metal Vocalist of All Time”. In 2009, Plant was voted “the greatest voice in rock” in a poll conducted by Planet Rock.

After Led Zeppelin disbanded in December 1980 (following the death of drummer John Bonham), Plant briefly considered abandoning music to pursue a career as a teacher in the Rudolf Steiner education system, going so far as to be accepted for teacher training. He nevertheless embarked on a successful solo career, helped by encouragement from Genesis drummer Phil Collins, who would go on to play with him.[35] Plant’s solo career began with the album Pictures at Eleven in 1982, followed by 1983’s The Principle of Moments. Popular tracks from this period include “Big Log” (a Top 20 hit in 1983), “In the Mood” (1983), “Little by Little” (from 1985’s Shaken ‘n’ Stirred), “Far Post” (originally only on the B-side of “Burning Down One Side” but popularised by airplay on album-oriented rock stations), “Tall Cool One” (a No. 25 hit from 1988’s Now and Zen) and later “I Believe” (from 1993’s Fate of Nations). This last track, like Led Zeppelin’s “All My Love”, was written for and dedicated to his late son, Karac. Whilst Plant avoided performing Led Zeppelin songs through much of this period (although he would occasionally improvise his unique Zeppelin screams into his set), his tours in 1983 (with Phil Collins on drums) and in 1985 were very successful, often performing to sold-out arena-sized venues. In 1986 Plant performed at the Birmingham Heart Beat Charity Concert with other famous Midlands musicians.

And this Collectors Edition is an EP by Robert Plant released in 1985.

Two rare live tracks, an extended version of “Little By Little” and one of the finest Robert Plant tracks from this period: “Sixes And Sevens” … a must for every Robert Plant collector !

BackCover1

Personnel:
Robbie Blunt (guitar)
Richie Hayward (drums)
Paul Martinez (bass)
Robert Plant (vocals)
Jezz Woodroffe (keyboards)

PageBluntTracklist:
01. Little By Little (Remix long version) (Plant/Woodroffe) 5.11
02. Easily Lead (live) (Plant/Martinez/Woodroffe) 7.54
03. Rockin’ At Midnight (live with The Honeydrippers) (Brown) 4.09
04. Sixes And Sevens (Plant/Martinez/Woodroffe/Hayward) 5.57

02. + 03. recorded live in Dallas, Texas on 24 June 1985.

LabelA1

*
**

Sting – The Dream Of The Blue Turtles (1985)

StingFrontCover1Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner CBE (born 2 October 1951), known as Sting, is an English musician and actor. He was the principal songwriter, lead singer, and bassist for the new wave rock band the Police from 1977 to 1984, and launched a solo career in 1985. He has included elements of rock, jazz, reggae, classical, new-age and worldbeat in his music.

As a solo musician and a member of The Police, Sting has received 17 Grammy Awards: he won Song of the Year for “Every Breath You Take”, three Brit Awards, including Best British Male Artist in 1994 and Outstanding Contribution in 2002, a Golden Globe, an Emmy and four nominations for the Academy Award for Best Original Song. In 2019, he received a BMI Award for “Every Breath You Take” becoming the most played song in radio history. In 2002, Sting received the Ivor Novello Award for Lifetime Achievement from the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers and Authors and was also inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Police in 2003. In 2000, he received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for recording. In 2003, Sting received a CBE from Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace for services to music. He was made a Kennedy Center Honoree at the White House in 2014, and was awarded the Polar Music Prize in 2017.

Sting2

With the Police, Sting became one of the world’s best-selling music artists. Solo and with the Police combined, he has sold over 100 million records. In 2006, Paste ranked him 62nd of the 100 best living songwriters. He was 63rd of VH1’s 100 greatest artists of rock, and 80th of Q magazine’s 100 greatest musical stars of the 20th century. He has collaborated with other musicians on songs such as “Money for Nothing” with Dire Straits, “Rise & Fall” with Craig David, “All for Love” with Bryan Adams and Rod Stewart, “You Will Be My Ain True Love” with Alison Krauss, and introduced the North African music genre raï to Western audiences through the hit song “Desert Rose” with Cheb Mami. In 2018, he released the album 44/876, a collaboration with Jamaican musician Shaggy, which won the Grammy Award for Best Reggae Album in 2019.

Singles

The Dream of the Blue Turtles is the first solo album by English musician Sting, released in the United States on 1 June 1985. The album reached number three on the UK Albums Chart[8] and number two on the US Billboard 200.

In the US the album spawned four singles, “If You Love Somebody Set Them Free”, “Fortress Around Your Heart”, “Russians” and “Love Is the Seventh Wave”. The album earned Grammy nominations for Album of the Year, Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, Best Jazz Instrumental Performance and Best Engineered Recording.

The album is named after a dream of Sting’s.

Although the single “If You Love Somebody Set Them Free” reached No. 3 in the US, it only reached 26 in the UK, where the album’s track “Russians” (about Cold War nuclear Stinganxieties, which had peaked in the 1980s) proved more popular.

In the UK the album was kept off No. 1 in the week of its release by Marillion’s Misplaced Childhood and Born in the U.S.A. by Bruce Springsteen occupying the top two places. However, in the US, the album reached No. 2 on the Billboard 200.

The movie Bring on the Night documents some of the recording work that produced this album, as well as the subsequent tour

The songs include “Children’s Crusade” (paralleling the destruction of the younger generation in World War I to the devastation brought about by heroin addiction in modern-day London); the original uptempo arrangement of The Police song “Shadows in the Rain”; “We Work the Black Seam” (about the UK miners’ strike of 1984–85); and “Moon over Bourbon Street”, a song inspired by Anne Rice’s novel Interview with the Vampire. “Consider Me Gone” references the first quatrain of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 35. (by wikipedia)

The Police never really broke up, they just stopped working together — largely because they just couldn’t stand playing together anymore and partially because Sting was itching to establish himself as a serious musician/songwriter on his own terms. Anxious to shed the mantle of pop star, he camped out at Eddy Grant’s studio, picked up the guitar, and raided Wynton Marsalis’ band for his new combo — thereby instantly consigning his solo debut, The Dream of the Blue Turtles, to the critical shorthand of Sting’s jazz record. Which is partially true (that’s probably the best name for the meandering instrumental title track), but that gives the impression that this is really risky music, when he did, after Sting3all, rely on musicians who, at that stage, were revivalists just developing their own style, and then had them jam on mock-jazz grooves — or, in the case of Branford Marsalis, layer soprano sax lines on top of pop songs. This, however, is just the beginning of the pretensions layered throughout The Dream of the Blue Turtles. Only twice does he delve into straightforward love songs — the lovely measured “Consider Me Gone” and the mournful closer, “Fortress Around Your Heart” — preferring to consider love in the abstract (“If You Love Somebody Set Them Free,” one of his greatest solo singles, and the childish, faux-reggae singalong “Love Is the Seventh Wave”), write about children in war and in coal mines, revive a Police tune about heroin, ponder whether “Russians love their children too,” and wander the streets of New Orleans as the vampire Lestat. This is a serious-minded album, but it’s undercut by its very approach — the glossy fusion that coats the entire album, the occasional grabs at worldbeat, and studious lyrics seem less pretentious largely because they’re overshadowed by such bewilderingly showy moves as adapting Prokofiev for “Russians” and calling upon Anne Rice for inspiration. And that’s the problem with the record: with every measure, every verse, Sting cries out for the respect of a composer, not a pop star, and it gets to be a little overwhelming when taken as a whole. As a handful of individual cuts — “Fortress,” “Consider Me Gone,” “If You Love Somebody,” “Children’s Crusade” — he proves that he’s subtler and craftier than his peers, but only when he reins in his desire to show the class how much he’s learned. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

BackCover

Personnel:
Robert Ashworth (guitar)
Eddy Grant  (percussion)
Omar Hakim (drums)
Darryl Jones (bass)
Kenny Kirkland (keyboards)
Branford Marsalis (saxophone, percussion)
Frank Opolko (trombone)
Danny Quatrochi (synclavier, background vocals)
Sting (vocals, guitar, synthesizer, bass on 09.)
+
background vocals:
Dolette McDonald – Janice Pendarvis – Pete Smith – Elliot Jones – Jane Alexander – Vic Garbarini – Pamela Quinlan – The Nannies Chorus – Rosemary Purt – Stephanie Crewdson – Joe Sumner – Kate Sumner – Michael Sumner

Booklet01A

Tracklist:
01. If You Love Somebody Set Them Free 4.16
02. Love Is the Seventh Wave 3.32
03. Russians  3.58
04. Children’s Crusade 5.02
05. Shadows In The Rain 4.52
06. We Work The Black Seam 5.43
07. Consider Me Gone 4.21
08. The Dream Of The Blue Turtles 1.18
09. Moon Over Bourbon Street 4.01
10. Fortress Around Your Heart 4.39

All song written by Sting
except 03. written by Sergei Prokofiev & Sting

Side Two1

*
**

Chet Baker Trio – Estate (2008)

FrontCover1This 1983 studio date, titled Crystal Bells here yet previously released under other titles, features trumpet Chet Baker performing within a trio setting with the Belgian duo of guitarist Philip Catherine and bassist Jean-Louis Rassinfosse. Although famously known as an intuitive musician who played by ear, by the ’80s Baker’s improvisation had coalesced into a beautifully logical, root harmony-based style in which one can discern the exact progressions of any given tune simply by listening to him. Here, his lines connect, turn by turn, melody upon melody like a pastel jigsaw puzzle forming before your eyes. Subsequently, Baker thrived in the company of the like-minded Belgians, whose bop-inflected technical prowess on their instruments was also matched by their deft sense for melodicism and sympathetic group interplay. As accompanists alone, they’re superb cohorts for the jazz legend, hanging their ears on each of his notes, outlining the harmonies behind him, and buoying his soft, lyrical phrases. There are also subtle stylistic juxtapositions within the trio with Catherine’s choice of electric, amplified guitar allowing for the occasional foray into country twang, or ambient, fusion-infused colorations. Similarly, though, Rassinfosse’s velvety double-bass lines reveal the influence of the impressionistic tone of Ron Carter, and he never fails to imply a clipped rhythmic pulse; a necessary skill in the drummerless setting Baker often favored in his later years. Ultimately, Crystal Bells is an absolutely magical session with inspired performances that still ring true so many years after Baker’s passing. (by Matt Collar)

Chet Baker

And here´s a review of this re-isssue edition:
Recorded in Belgium in 1983, Estate features Chet Baker backed by one of his best European trios with guitarist Philip Catherine and bassist Jean-Louis Rassinfosse. A lithe guitarist with a sophisticated style well matched to Baker’s melodic lyricism, Catherine is as much a featured player here as sideman. Although Great American Songbook compositions were always Baker’s preference, here he primarily eschews the Broadway canon in favor of lesser-played jazz standards including Horace Silver’s “Strollin’,” Charlie Mariano’s “Crystal Bells,” and Richie Beirach’s softly played tango “Leaving.” Although the aforementioned tracks have been released under alternate album titles, the trio’s 1985 live recording of “My Funny Valentine” is included here as an added bonus. For longtime fans, Estate is essential latter-career Baker. (by Matt Collar)

Original front + backcover:
OriginalFront+BackCover

Personnel:
Chet Baker (trumpet, vocals on 07.)
Philip Catherine (guitar)
Jean-Louis Rassinfosse (bass)

Chet Baker Trio
Tracklist:
01. Crystal Bells (Mariano) 6.14
02. Strollin (Silver) 7.26
03. Lament (Johnson) 7.37
04. Leaving (Beirach) 9.43
05. Cherokee (Noble) 6.49
06. Estate (Martino)
+
07. My Funny Valentine (live) (Rodgers/Hart) 10.19

OriginalLabelB1

*
**

Alternate labels:
AlternateLabels

 

Pete York, Brian Auger & Colin Hodgkinson – Steaming (1985)

FrontCover1.jpgI guess, every serious fan ofRock & Jazz music should know this names:

Pete York – Brian Auger – Colin Hodgkinson:

Everyone has a great career and everyone is a real important part in the history of Rock & Jazz music …use wikipedia to discover them …

A digital live recording of the trio in Freiburg, Germany, in April 1985. After their fine work the previous year with Spencer Davis, the tightness of York and Hodgkinson’s interplay on this release comes as little surprise. Auger makes for a fine third, though, with his electric piano lines wafting effortlessly over the rhythm section of “For No One.” Despite a long and loping cover of Donovan’s “Season of the Witch,” and a Hammond romp through a Jimmy McGriff number, the emphasis brought by Auger’s presence is on electric jazz-rock. The band even gamely covers a couple Billy Strayhorn chestnuts mid-show. Like the York/Hodgkinson concerts with Spencer Davis, though, it’s Hodgkinson’s solo bits that steal the spotlight. His sinewy “Catcote Rag” bass solo features some lovely glissando playing, and the “San Francisco Bay Blues” hearkens back to his string-shredding bass blues with Back Door. (by by Paul Collins)

In other words:

LinerNotes

What more can I say? Listen to this exciting and rare Jazz-Rock album …

BackCover1.jpg

Personnel:
Brian Auger (keyboards, vocals)
Colin Hodgkinson (bass, vocals)
Pete York (drums)

Booklet02A.jpg

Tracklist;
01. No One (Brunell) 4.40
02. Freedom Jazz Dance (Harris) 6.15
03. Catcote Rag (Hodgkinson) 3.04
04. San Francisco Bay Blues (Fuller) 3.23
05. Take the “A” Train (Strayhorn) 2.42
06. Prelude To A Kiss (Ellington/Gordon/Mills) 3.23
07. The Hawk Talk (Bellson) 3.27
08. Season Of The Witch (Leitch) 11.46
09. All About My Girl (McGriff) 6.12
10. Going Down Slow (Burnett) 5.06
11. Compared to What (McDaniels) 10.07

CD1.jpg

*
**

BookletBackCover1

More rarities from Inak Records:

Booklet03A

John Paul Jones – Scream For Help (OST) (1985)

FrontCover1Scream for Help is a soundtrack album by John Paul Jones, released by Atlantic Records on 22 March 1985 to accompany the film Scream for Help (a horror movie). Following the Death Wish II album project, guitarist Jimmy Page was asked by his Berkshire neighbour, movie director Michael Winner, to record a soundtrack for the film Scream for Help in August 1984. Due to other commitments by Page, he instead suggested to Winner that Jones, who had just completed upgrading his 24-track digital recording studio at Devon, was best placed to write and record the soundtrack. In return, Jones asked Page to help record two tracks “Crackback” and “Spaghetti Junction”.

The musical score differs in style from the Death Wish pentalogy of films, with Winner requesting that a minimum 70 piece orchestra backing be used for the soundtrack in addition to Jones’ rock arrangements. Besides Page, folk guitarist John Renbourn assists on guitar, and Yes singer Jon Anderson sessioned on vocals as well as Madeline Bell, for whom Jones had previous produced, composed, recorded, and played all the instruments for her solo album Comin’ Atcha in December 1973. Jones sings lead vocals on “When You Fall in Love”. Jacinda Baldwin (aka Jacinda Jones), Jones’ daughter is co-writer on two tracks. It was his first full-length album release since the break-up of Led Zeppelin. (by wikipedia)

MoviePic01

The score for this otherwise forgotten Michael Winner film was written by former Led Zeppelin member John Paul Jones and performed by Jones with Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page, Madeline Bell, and Yes singer Jon Anderson. It is unremarkable, but since it represents Jones’s only recorded work since Led Zeppelin’s demise in 1980, completists may wish to seek it out. (by William Ruhlmann)

BackCover1.jpg

Personnel:
Colin Green (background vocals)
John Paul Jones (keyboards, synthesizer, bass, guitar, vocals on 02. + 08. background vocals)
John Renbourn (guitar)
Graham Ward (drums, percussion)
+
Jon Anderson (vocals on 03. + 07.)
Madeline Bell (vocals  on 06. + 09.)
Jimmy Page (guitar on 01. + 04.)
+
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
The Johnny Pearson Studio Orchestra – Orchestra

Booklet1.jpgTracklist:
01. Spaghetti Junction (Jones) 5.00
02. Bad Child (Jones/Baldwin) 5.45
03. Silver Train (Jones/Anderson) 3.49
04. Crackback (Jones/Page) 4.15
05. Chilli Sauce (Jones) 4.59
06. Take It Or Leave It (Jones/M.Bell) 4.28
07. Christie (Jones) 3.06
08. When You Fall In Love (Jones/Baldwin) 3.35
09. Here I Am (Jones/S.Bell) 4.33

LabelB1.jpg

*
**

MoviePic02

Marillion – Misplaced Childhood (1985)

FrontCover1.JPGMisplaced Childhood is the third studio album by the British neo-progressive rock band Marillion, released in 1985. It is a concept album loosely based on the childhood of Marillion’s lead singer, Fish, who was inspired by a brief incident that occurred while he was under the influence of acid.

The album was recorded during the spring of 1985 at Hansa Tonstudio in Berlin and produced by Chris Kimsey, who had previously worked with the Rolling Stones. Misplaced Childhood is the group’s most commercially successful album to date, peaking immediately at number one in the UK charts and spending a total of 41 weeks on the chart. It ultimately gained the Platinum status. It features Marillion’s two most successful singles, the guitar-led rock ballad “Kayleigh”, which reached number two in the UK, and piano-led “Lavender”, which peaked at number five.

Misplaced Childhood was listed as the sixth best album of 1985 by Kerrang! and chosen as the fourth greatest concept album of all time by Classic Rock in 2003.

“I was in ‘Padres Bay’ when suddenly I felt a child standing behind me on the stairs. I knew he was dressed as a soldier and vanished as soon as he entered the corner or my eye. Perhaps it was my muse; perhaps it was the drug. It was enough to propel me into reaming off a large scrawl of prose.” (Fish)

Singles.jpg

Misplaced Childhood was Marillion’s first full concept album consisting of two continuous pieces of music on the two sides of the vinyl record. The story has thematic elements of lost love, sudden success, acceptance, and lost childhood, along with an upbeat ending. As Fish explains, he conceived the concept during a 10-hour acid trip.

Several of the songs and titles contain notable autobiographical references; for example, “Kayleigh” references the breakdown of relationships as a whole but is centered around a Fish’s past girlfriend named Kay Lee. Fish came up with the name Kayleigh in order to obscure the original name due to the song being too personal. Another example is “Heart of Lothian” (“I was born with the heart of Lothian”) which is a reference to a traditional region of Scotland – Fish himself being from Midlothian – and a reference to the Heart of Midlothian (Royal Mile) – a mosaic heart in the pavement of Edinburgh’s Royal Mile.

Marillion01.jpg

The theme of childhood is developed in “Lavender”, which is partly based on the traditional folk song “Lavender Blue”. Like “Kayleigh” it is a love song, but whereas “Kayleigh” was about the failure of an adult relationship, “Lavender” recalls the innocence of childhood.

Like Script for a Jester’s Tear and Fugazi, the original vinyl edition[nb 1] of Misplaced Childhood was released in a gatefold sleeve. The artwork was created by Mark Wilkinson who was commissioned to the role on all Marillion albums and 12″ singles of the Fish-era.

The front cover features a soldier drummer portrayed by Robert Mead, a then ten-year-old boy who lived next door to Wilkinson. Mead also appeared on the artwork of the album’s three hit singles, “Kayleigh”, “Lavender”, and “Heart of Lothian”, and can be seen in the music video for “Kayleigh”. The Jester from the two previous studio albums is imagined escaping through the window on the back cover.

Marillion02.jpg

Misplaced Childhood was released in the United Kingdom on 17 June 1985 by EMI Records[1] on LP,[ 12″ picture disc and cassette and went on to be the band’s biggest selling album. It topped the UK Albums Chart, becoming the first and the only Marillion album to do so. It stayed on the charts for 41 weeks, the longest chart residency of any of the band’s albums. Misplaced Childhood was certified Platinum by the BPI for sales in excess of 300.000 copies on 26 November 1985 just 5 months after the release. It was the 20th best selling album in the United Kingdom for 1985.

The album was also highly successful across mainland Europe reaching number 3 in Germany, number 6 in Switzerland and the Netherlands, the latter of which is where Marillion have one of their largest fanbases, and number 10 in Norway. In the United States Misplaced Childhood came out on the Capitol Records label and reached number 47 on the Billboard 200 chart, the highest position the band has ever achieved.

Marillion03.jpg

Three singles, “Kayleigh”, “Lavender”, and “Heart of Lothian” were released, with the first preceding the album. “Kayleigh” peaked at number 2 in the UK Singles Chart turning out to be the biggest hit for Marillion and prompting the success of Misplaced Childhood. The two further singles were less successful but still ended up at high positions as “Lavender” reached number 5 and “Heart of Lothian” peaked at number 29.

On 21 July 2017, a deluxe edition of Misplaced Childhood was released via Parlophone as a 4CD/Blu-ray set along with a 4LP boxed version. The deluxe edition includes a new remaster, as well as, on the Blu-ray disc, new high-resolution stereo and 5.1 surround remixes by Steven Wilson. The set also includes a previously unreleased 1985 concert from Utrecht featuring a performance of Misplaced Childhood in its entirety, along with demos and rarities.

“It was not only a breakthrough album for the band but also for me as an artist because I was finally discovering my own individual style as a lyricist and singer.” (Fish) (by wikipedia)

Marillion04

After the album-tour-album cycle of Script for a Jester’s Tear, Fugazi, and the subsequent Euro-only release of Real to Reel, Marillion retreated to Berlin’s Hansa Ton Studios with Rolling Stones producer Chris Kimsey to work on their next opus. Armed with a handful of lyrics born out of a self-confessed acid trip, Fish came up with the elaborate concept for 1985’s Misplaced Childhood. Touching upon his early childhood experiences and his inability to deal with a slew of bad breakups exacerbated by a never-ending series of rock star-type “indulgences,” Misplaced Childhood would prove to be not only the band’s most accomplished release to date, but also its most streamlined. Initial record company skepticism over the band’s decision to forge ahead with a ’70s-style prog rock opus split into two halves (sides one and two) quickly evaporated as Marillion delivered its two most commercial singles ever: “Kayleigh” and “Lavender.” With its lush production and punchy mix, the album went on to become the band’s greatest commercial triumph, especially in Europe where they would rise from theater attraction to bona fide stadium royalty. The subsequent U.S. success of “Kayleigh” would also see Marillion returning to the States for a difficult tour as Rush’s support act. (by John Franck)

Deluxe Edition.jpg

And I add all audio traks from Deleuxe Edtion from 2017 … Enjoy this masterpiece !

BackCover1.JPG

Personnel:
Fish (vocals)
Mark Kelly (keyboards)
Ian Mosley (drums, percussion)
Steve Rothery (guitar, bass guitar)
Pete Trewavas (bass)

Booklet1

Tracklist:

CD 1: The original album:
01. Pseudo Silk Kimono 2.13
02. Kayleigh 4.04
03. Lavender 2.27
04. Bitter Suite 7.55
05. Heart Of Lothian 4.04
06. Waterhole (Expresso Bongo) 2.13
07. Lords Of The Backstage 1.53
08. Blind Curve 9.29
09. Childhoods End? 4.33
10. White Feather 2.24

CD 2: Live At Utrecht 1985 (Part One):
11. Emerald Lies (Intro) 0.50
12. Script For A Jester’s Tear 8.42
13. Incubus 9.42
14. Chelsea Monday 9:59
15. The Web 8.18

CD 3: Live At Utrecht 1985 (Part Two):
16. Pseudo Silk Kimono 3.15
17. Kayleigh 4.00
18. Lavender 2.20
19. Bitter Suite 8:21
20. Heart Of Lothian 4.03
21. Waterhole (Expresso Bongo) 2.26
22. Lords Of The Backstage 1.48
23. Blind Curve 9.36
24. Childhoods End? 4.14
25. White Feather 5.29
Encores:
26. Fugazi 12.35
27. Garden Party 6.15
28. Market Square Heroes 7.25

CD 4: Singles, B-Sides & Demos:
29. Lady Nina (B-Side) 5.50
30. Freaks (B-Side) 4.08
31. Kayleigh (Alternative Mix) 4.03
32. Lavender Blue 4.23
33. Heart Of Lothian (Extended Mix) 5.49
34. Lady Nina (Steven Wilson Stereo Remix)3:43
‘Misplaced Childhood’ Demos:
35. Pseudo Silk Kimono 2.19
36. Kayleigh 3.59
37. Lavender 2.38
38. Bitter Suite: Brief Encounter/Lost Weekend 2.55
39. Lords Of The Backstage 1.47
40. Blue Angel 1.46
41. Misplaced Rendezvous 1.57
42. Heart Of Lothian: Wide Boy/Curtain Call 3.49
43. Waterhole (Expresso Bongo) 2.01
44. Passing Strangers: Mylo/Perimeter Walk/Threshold 9.17
45. Childhoods End? 2.24
46. White Feather 2.14

All lyrics written by Fish; all music composed by Mark Kelly, Ian Mosley, Steve Rothery and Pete Trewavas.

LabelB1.JPG

*
**

CoverIllustratrion.jpg

Passport – Running In Real Time (1985)

FrontCover1.jpgIt’s quite impressive knowing Passport as they were very productive in generating albums and this “Running in Real Time” was their 14th studio album since their first inception in 1971. Many have considered this Germany-based band in comparison with its American counterpart Weather Report eventhough the music is not quite the same. This release is quite surprise to me as it features two kind of music: the original root of Passport with its jazz-rock fusion style with many saxophone work and those with vocals where the music tend to be R&B instead of jazz.

The opening track “At Large” demonstrates the original root of Passport in jazz-rock fusion style featuring sax solo combined nicely with guitar work laid over jazzy rhythm section. The next track “Auyrin” is a slow speed jazzy tunes with sax as main melody backed with solid basslines. There is also nice guitar solo right after sax. These two opening tracks resembles the original style of Passport music. “Talisman” is explorative in nature, demonstrating bamboo flute played by the band leader Klaus Doldinger cmbined nicely with vocals as well as excellent percussion by the band’s long serving drummer: Curt Cress. Starting with “Help Me” Passport made an effort to do differently, introducing vocal by Victoria Miles. The music has the kind of R&B style. But of course it’s not a typical R&B you can hear easily at radio station. It’s in fact quite enjoyable.

Overall, I consider this album is a good one especially for those who love jazz-rock fusion but don’t get surprises if you find some kind of R&B music as the vocal enters. Keep on proggin’ ..! (by Gatot)

Klaus Doldinger

Personnel:
Curt Cress (drums, percussion)
Klaus Doldinger (saxophone, bamboo flute, keyboards)
Victoria Miles (vocals)
Kevin Mulligan (guitar)
Dieter Petereit (bass)
Hermann Weindorf (keyboards)
+
Bill Lang (guitar 0n 01., 03. – 06.)
Claus Reichstaller (trumpet on 08.)
Franz Weyerer (trumpet on 08.)
Roykey Wydh (guitar on 07. + 08.)

LPBackCover.jpg

Tracklist:
01. At Large 4.48
02. Auryn 5.37
03. Talisman 7.32
04. Help Me 4.14
05. Joy Riding 6.40
06. Slap Shot 5.47
07. Mr. Mystery 4.16
08. Running In Real Time 3.43

Music composed by Klaus Doldinger

LabelA1

 

*
**

More Passport:

MorePassport

Ray Lema – Medecine (1985)

FrontCover1.jpgRaymond Lema A’nsi Nzinga (born 30 March 1946), known as Ray Lema, is a Congolese (DRC) musician. A pianist, guitarist, and songwriter, he settled in France in 1982.rn in Lufu-Toto, Bas-Congo Province. As a child he wanted to be a priest and in 1957 at the age of 11 entered a seminary of the White Fathers (a Roman Catholic society of apostolic life), where his talent for music was recognized. He began learning the organ and piano, within a European classical canon that included Gregorian chants, Mozart and Chopin; his concert debut was Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata. He left the seminary in 1962 and subsequently attended the University of Kinshasa, where he studied chemistry. He became interested in popular music from outside Africa and after learning to play guitar he began his involvement with the Kinshasa music scene. He became a performer in clubs and was a fan of musicians such as Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton.

In the early 1970s Lema went round the country recording as an ethnomusicologist. In 1974 he became music director for two years of the National Ballet of Zaire. Over the years he has played with the bands of Tabu Ley Rochereau, Joseph Kabasele and Franco, and in 1978 his own band, Ya Tupas, won the French Maracas d’Or award.

Ray Lema01

In 1979 he was invited by the Rockefeller Foundation to the United States, where he recorded his first album, Koteja (1982). He then moved to Europe, settling in 1982 in France. His album Kinshasa-Washington DC-Paris was released in 1983. His album Medecine was recorded in London with Martin Meissonnier. His first recordings in the early 1980s were for Celluloid Records, and by 1989 he had international success signing with the Island Records subsidiary, Mango.

Lema has become a major figure in world music, performing at numerous music festivals, and has also worked as a film composer. He has also been involved with various international collaborations. He appears as a vocalist (and composer on three tracks) on Stewart Copeland’s 1985 album, The Rhythmatist. Guests on Lema’s 1989 album Nangadeef include Courtney Pine and the Mahotella Queens. In 1992 he spent time in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, writing the opera Un Touareg s’est marié avec une pygmée with Cameroonian Werewere Liking, and also that year worked with German pianist Joachim Kuhn to record Euro African Suites. In 1997, he recorded the album Bulgarian Voices with the choir of the Pirin Folk Ensemble, and composed The Dream of the Gazelle for a Swedish chamber orchestra. In 2000 he worked with Moroccan band Tyour Gnaoua and brought out the CD Saf.

Ray Lema02

In 2002, Lema appeared on a track titled “No Agreement” on the Red Hot Organization’s tribute album to Fela Kuti, Red Hot and Riot alongside Res, Tony Allen, Baaba Maal, Positive Black Soul and Archie Shepp.

He was awarded the “Django d’Or” in October 2003 (by wikipedia)

And here´s his second solo-album:

Born in Zaire (now D.R.Congo) in 1946, Ray Lema proved at a young age to be a gifted pianist and guitarist. He worked as an ethnomusicologist, and in the mid-70s was commissioned by the Zairean government to assemble a National Ballet for Zaire. In 1979 Ray received a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation to travel and perform in USA. There he recorded his first album, Koteja. Two years later he moved to Europe, staying in Belgium and France. In France he formed the band Carma and started a record label, Celluloid with his album Kinshasa-Washington DC-Paris in 1983. Medecine followed in 1985. Since then, he has travelled the world, working with musicians from Ivory Coast, Cape Verde, Cameroon, Morocco and Europe. In 1989, the Mahotella Queens featured on the track ‘Kamulang’ on the Nangadeef album.

Ray Lema03

Medecine draws on traditional central African music and translates it into reggae-tinged electronic funk for your Nintendo. He strikes the perfect balance between traditional and electronic, African and western. Every song is a gem, none more so that the 7-minute ‘Bored Whore’. Lema handles vocals, guitar, percussion and keyboards on the album, while the electronics were programmed by Martyn Philips and Martin Meissonnier. Legendary Afrobeat drummer Tony Allen lays down the groove on ‘Marabout’ and ‘Peuple Eyo’.

Progressive South African label Shifty re-released the album in 1990. (afrosynth.com)

AlternateFrontCoverAlternate frontcover

Personnel:
Athey Dialopa (saxophone)
Ray Lema (vocals, guitar, keyboards, percussion)
Martin Meissonnier (electronics, synthesizer)
amba N’Go (guitar)
Martyn Phillips (electronics, synthesizer)
+
Tony Allen (drums on 01. + 04.)
M’Bamina (vocals on 02. + 06.)
Boffi Banengola (drums on 01. + 07.)
Fanfan (guitar on 01.)
Pape Thiam (percussion on 03.)

BackCover.jpg

Tracklist:
01. Marabout (Iyolela) 6.55
02. Ninga 6.43
03. Nzola 4.37
04. Peuple Eyo 5.54
05. Lusala 3.01
06. Bored Whore 7.09
07. Dansometer Reprise 3.17

All songs written by Ray Lema

LabelB1.jpg

*
**

Stan Getz – Tribute To Zoot Sims (1985)

FrontCover1.jpgOver the last seven years the Chicago Jazz Festival clearly has become the best-programmed, most consistently exciting jazz event in the country – one that attracts Chicagoans of all races, ages and income levels and knits them together into a big swinging family.

What may not be so obvious, though, is what the Fest does for the image of the city of Chicago.

On any given night, a good percentage of the audience consists of visitors from all across the country, most of whom have come here especially for the Fest. And this year there also was a large foreign contingent, including fans from China, Japan, France, Austria, Great Britain, Australia, Germany and Finland. To modify an old saying: Build a better jazz fest and the world will beat a path to your door.

Sunday`s concert, which concluded this year’s Fest, was attended by a crowd estimated at 62,000 – an estimate that, as on most nights, seemed rather conservative by the standards used in previous years. Be that as it may, there could be no quarrel about the quality of most of the music.

Choosing highlights is difficult, but the final tribute of this year’s tribute-rich Fest would have to be one, a salute to the late Zoot Sims that featured four of his distinguished partners, Stan Getz, Gerry Mulligan, Jimmy Giuffre and Herbie Steward.

StanGetz02

Of course, this group amounts to half of the sax section that recorded ”Four Brothers” with Woody Herman, plus Giuffre, the piece’s composer-arranger. So a performance of ”Four Brothers” was both obligatory and handsomely done, as was Getz’s famous Herman feature, ”Early Autumn.”

Before that, Getz had been typically dazzling, while Mulligan, the closest friend of Sims on the bill, had made that bond clear in his playing. The only regret was that the all-star lineup left too little space to Giuffre and Steward. (Larry Kart, Chicago Tribune; September 2, 1985)

What a line-up !

Recorded live at the Jazz Festival Chicago, Chicago, IL; August 31, 1985
Very good FM broadcast.

AlternateFrontCoverAlternate front cover

Personnel:
Kenny Barron (piano)
Al Foster (drums)
Stan Getz (saxophone)
Jimmy Giuffre (saxophone)
George Mraz (bass)
Gerry Mulligan (saxophone)
Herbie Steward – tenor saxophone

BackCover1
Tracklist:
01. Introduction / Let Me Count The Ways 13:20
02. If You Cared For Me Like I Cared For You Then You Wouldn’t Cared All (Feldmman) 5.13
03. Falling In Love (Rogers) 14.32
04. Blues For Zoot (Mulligan) 6.17
05. Georgia On My Mind (Carmichael) 4.23
06. Satin Doll (Ellington/Strayhorn) 5.03
07. The Red Door (Sims) 6.14
08. Zoot (Giuffre) 5.48
09. Four Brothers (Giuffre) 5.16
10. Early Autumn (Burns) 3.50

StanGetz01.jpg

*
**