Charlie Byrd Quartet – Let Go (1969)

FrontCover1Charlie Lee Byrd (September 16, 1925 – December 2, 1999) was an American jazz guitarist. Byrd was best known for his association with Brazilian music, especially bossa nova. In 1962, he collaborated with Stan Getz on the album Jazz Samba, a recording which brought bossa nova into the mainstream of North American music.

Byrd played fingerstyle on a classical guitar. (wikipedia)

And here´s another exciting Charlie Byrd album (recorded live).

And Charlie Byrd is doing his bossa jazz thing …

… tasteful, low-key, and ingratiatingly melodic, Charlie Byrd had two notable accomplishments to his credit — applying acoustic classical guitar techniques to jazz and popular music and helping to introduce Brazilian music to mass North American audiences.

What a great musician !

Recorded live at the Hong Kong Bar, Century Plaza Hotel, Los Angeles,
February 27 and 28, 1969

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Personnel:
Charlie Byrd (guitar)
Gene Byrd (bass)
Mario Darpino (flute)
William Reichenbach (drums)

LinerNotesTracklist:
01. Let Go (Canto De Ossanha) (Gimbel/Powell/Demoraes) 5.27
02. Medley: Mood Indigo (Ellington/Mills/Bigard) / Satin Doll (Mercer/Ellington/Strayhorn) 6.21
03. Blues 13 (Byrd) 4.44
04. Here’s That Rainy Day (Burke/Van Heusen) 2.51
05. Esperando O Sol (Pereira/Albanese) 6.20
06. Bird Of Paradise (Ellis) 12.06
07. How Long Has This Been Going On (Gershwin) 3.47
08. Promises, Promises (Bacharach/David) 5.35
09. Lonely Princess (Mancini) 2.43
10. This Guy’s In Love With You (Bacharach/David) 2.02

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CharlieByrd03Charlie Lee Byrd (September 16, 1925 – December 2, 1999)

Eliane Elias – Live At Festival Grenzenlos (2009)

FrontCover1Eliane Elias (born 19 March 1960) is a Brazilian jazz pianist, singer, composer and arranger.

Elias was born in São Paulo, Brazil. She started studying piano at age seven, and at age twelve she was transcribing solos from jazz musicians. At fifteen, she was teaching piano and improvisation. Her performing career began in Brazil at age seventeen with Brazilian singer-songwriter Toquinho and touring with the poet Vinicius de Moraes.

In 1981 she moved to New York City, where she attended The Juilliard School of Music. A year later she became part of the group Steps Ahead. In 1993 Elias signed with EMI Classics to record classical pieces, which were released on On the Classical Side.

In 2001, Calle 54 a documentary film by Spanish director Fernando Trueba included Elias performing “Samba Triste.” In 2002 she recorded The Lost Days with Denyce Graves, Eliane Eliasarranging two Brazilian classical pieces and writing an original composition especially for Graves entitled “HaabiaTupi.” In 2002, Elias signed with RCA/Bluebird, which Kissed by Nature, an album of mostly original compositions. Dreamer was released in 2004 and received the Gold Disc Award, as well as being voted Best Vocal Album in Japan. It reached No. 3 on the pop charts in France and No. 4 on the Billboard magazine charts in the U.S. Around the City was released by RCA Victor in August 2006.

Elias returned to Blue Note/EMI in 2007 with Something for You, which won Best Vocal Album of the Year and the Gold Disc Award in Japan. This was her third consecutive recording to receive these awards, and her fourth overall. Something for You reached No. 1 on the U.S. jazz charts, No. 8 on Billboard, and No. 2 on the French jazz charts. In 2008, she recorded Bossa Nova Stories to celebrate the 50th anniversary of bossa nova.

In 2009, EMI Japan released Eliane Elias Plays Live. Light My Fire, released in 2011, features four compositions written or co-written by Elias and includes covers of songs by the Doors, Stevie Wonder, and Paul Desmond. In September 2011, her song “What About the Heart (Bate Bate)” was nominated for a Latin Grammy in the category of Best Brazilian Song. In 2012 she collaborated with bassist Marc Johnson on the album Swept Away, the Editor’s and Critic’s choice in 2012 Downbeat and Jazztimes magazines, respectively. Her 2013 release, I Thought About You, reached No. 1 on the U.S. and French Amazon.com websites; No. 2 on iTunes U.S., France and Brazil; and No. 4 on Billboard.

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Made in Brazil, was followed by Dance of Time, which debuted at No. 1 on two Billboard: jazz and world music. Both Made in Brazil and Dance of Time debuted at No. 1 on iTunes in seven countries and won Grammy awards for Best Latin Jazz Album of the Year.

Elias is of Lebanese descent. She was married to American trumpeter Randy Brecker, with whom she has a daughter, the singer/songwriter Amanda Elias Brecker, born in 1984. She is married to Marc Johnson, who plays bass in her band and co-produces her recordings. (by wikipedia)

Marc Johnson

And here´s an excellent broadcast recording from Germany and it´s time to discover this wonderful lady … and if you like this great mixture between Boss Nova and Jazz … this recording is a must !

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Personnel:
Rafael Barata (drums)
Rubens de La Corte (guitar)
Eliane Elias (piano, vocals)
Marc Johnson (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Chega de Saudade (Jobim/de Moraes) 11.58
02. They Can’t Take That Away From Me (G.Gershwin/I.Gershwin) 4.05
03. Por causa de voceÌ (Ben) 4.38
04. So danco samba (Jobim/de Moraes/Gimbel) 5.53
05. Tangerine (Mercer/Schertzinger) 6.11
06. Introductions by Eliane Elias 1.32
07. The Girl From 
Ipanema (Jobim/de Moraes) 3.17
08. Fotografia (Jobim/Gilbert) 6.45

Rafael Barata

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Henri Salvador – Reverence (2006)

FrontCover1.jpgHenri Salvador (18 July 1917 – 13 February 2008) was a French Caribbean comedian and singer.

Salvador was born in Cayenne, French Guiana. His father, Clovis, and his mother, Antonine Paterne, daughter of a native Carib Indian, were both from Guadeloupe, French West Indies. Salvador had a brother, André, and a sister, Alice.

He began his musical career as a guitarist accompanying other singers. He had learned the guitar by imitating Django Reinhardt’s recordings, and was to work alongside him in the 1940s. Salvador recorded several songs written by Boris Vian with Quincy Jones as arranger. He played many years with Ray Ventura and His Collegians where he used to sing, dance and even play comedy on stage.

He also appeared in movies including Nous irons à Monte-Carlo (1950), Nous irons à Paris (Jean Boyer’s film of 1949 with the Peters Sisters) and Mademoiselle s’amuse (1948).

He is known to have recorded the first French rock and roll songs in 1957 written by Boris Vian and Michel Legrand — “Rock’n Roll Mops”, “Rock hoquet, Va t’faire cuire un oeuf, man” and “Dis-moi qu’tu m’aimes rock” — under the artist name of Henry Cording (a play on the word “Recording”). Despite this historical aspect, he never ceased to claim that he disliked rock and roll and even refused to talk about this subject later on.

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In the 1960s, Salvador was the host of several popular television variety shows on French TV. In 1964, he scored a hit with “Zorro est arrivé”, which was inspired by The Coasters’ U.S. hit “Along Came Jones”. He is also famous for his rich, catchy laugh, which is a theme in many of his humorous songs. In 1969, Henri Salvador recorded a variation of “Mah Nà Mah Nà” entitled “Mais non, mais non” (“But No, But No” or “Of Course Not, Of Course Not”), with lyrics he had written in French to Piero Umiliani’s music.

Henri Salvador and his song “Dans mon île” (1957) were thought to be an influence on Antônio Carlos Jobim in formulating the Brazilian bossa nova style.

Caetano Veloso, a famous Brazilian composer and singer, made Henri Salvador famous to Brazilian audiences with the song “Reconvexo”, in which he says “quem não sentiu o swing de Henri Salvador?” (“who hasn’t felt the swing of Henri Salvador?”). Veloso also recorded a version of Salvador’s song “Dans mon île”.

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At the age of 70, Salvador was the voice-over of the crab Sebastian in the 1989 French dubbing of Disney’s The Little Mermaid. Recordings of “Embrasse-la” (“Kiss the Girl”) can be found on YouTube.

Salvador discovered singers Keren Ann and Art Mengo.

He died of a ruptured aneurysm at his home in the early hours of 13 February 2008. He was 90 years of age. He was buried next to his wife Jacqueline in Père-Lachaise Cemetery.

He was known as a supporter of Paris Saint-Germain F.C. He obtained four seats for life in the Parc des Princes.

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Henri Salvador continues to be popular today among French communities in Canada. In 2000, Virgin Records released a CD featuring popular hits such as “Jazz Mediterrannée”, which continues to receive regular air play. In 2002, his album Chambre avec vue sold over two million copies. In 2005, Salvador was awarded the Brazilian Order of Cultural Merit, which he received from the acclaimed singer and Minister of Culture, Gilberto Gil, in the presence of President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva for his influence on Brazilian culture, particularly on bossa nova, to whose invention he contributed. That same year he took 52nd place in the election of Le Plus Grand Français (The Greatest Frenchman).

He was also a commander of the French Légion d’honneur and of the French National Order of Merit. In 2007, he released Révérence on V2 Records, featuring Gilberto Gil and Caetano Veloso. He then went on to perform the track “La vie c’est la vie” from that album on an episode of the BBC programme Later… with Jools Holland aired on 4 May 2007. (by wikipedia)

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At 88 years old, Henri Salvador has been a popular figure in the French music world for quite a while (he started there in 1945). In 2000, he reinvigorated his career and reintroduced himself to the public with Chambre Avec Vue (re-released as Room with a View two years later) and since then has been going quite strong, coming out with Ma Chère et Tendre in 2003, and now Révérence in 2006. Recorded mostly in Brazil under the direction of Caetano Veloso’s — who makes an appearance here on a new version of “Dans Mon Île” — longtime producer and arranger Jaques Morelenbaum, Salvador continues his legacy as singer of the sweet melancholy. The quiet, breathy strings and soft bossa nova rhythms that are incorporated into many of the pieces on the album add to the overall poignancy of Salvador’s voice, which shows no sign of aging, still smooth and clean, reflecting the warmth of his native French Guyana.

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It works especially well on the francophone version of the classic Vinicius de Moraes/Antonio Carlos Jobim song “Eu Sei Que Voi Te Amar,” retitled “Tu Sais Je Vais T’Aimer” here (it appears twice on Révérence actually, once as a solo track and once as a duet with Gilberto Gil), where the longing and suffering of love come through in the timbre of his voice, the hesitation in his phrasing. In “Italie (Un Tableau de Maître),” he riffs on a familiar Italian melody as he reminisces about the country, talking about it like a woman he loves, even slipping into its own language for a line or so, and in “Cherche la Rose,” one of three older tracks on the album, and done with Caetano Veloso, there’s a bittersweet hesitancy to the way he sings the song 40 years after its initial release that comes only from the experience and understanding he’s gained as he’s gotten older.

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This is where he’s best, and most comfortable, and it’s what sounds the best, too, so it makes sense that most of Révérence stays in the adagio, in the reflection. In fact, it even seems a little out of place when Salvador moves into faster, jazzier pieces like the gospel-inspired “Alléluia! Je l’Ai dans la Peau” or the Frank Sinatra-esque “L’Amour Se Trouve au Coin de la Rue,” adding saxophones and bright drums and coming across slightly forced, albeit exuberant. Salvador has aged nicely, and settled down into his years, and the best bits of Révérence convey this perfectly, the life of an artist who has truly been inspired, and inspired countless others. (by Marisa Brown)

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Henri Salvador is an 89-year-old with an extraordinary history. Born in French Guyana, he moved to France as a child, joined a dance orchestra as guitarist, and ended up working in Brazil, where his songs would later influence the work of the great Tom Jobim – the greatest composer of the bossa nova era of the late 1950s. Salvador also became a celebrity, and a TV personality back in France, and he now seems poised for unlikely international success. This new set was recorded in Paris, New York and (of course) Rio, where his producer was the great Jacques Morelenbaum, who has worked with everyone from Jobim to Mariza; they were joined by Brazilian stars Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil. It’s remarkable for Salvador’s effortlessly clear, perfect vocals and equally unexpected range. Many of the songs are gently charming laid-back ballads, but there’s also a swinging French-language treatment of Ray Charles, with Alleluia! Je l’Ai Dans la Peau. Alleluia, indeed. (by Robin Denselow)

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Personnel:
Patrick Artero (saxophone, trumpet)
Marcelo Bernades (flute)
Bernardo Bessler (violone)
Paulinho Braga (drums, percussion)
Denner Campolina (bass)
Mino Cinelu (drums, percussion)
Michel Coeuriot (clarinet, keyboards, oboe, synthesizer)
Thomas Coeuriot (guitar, mandoline)
Marcelo Costa (percussion)
Guy Delacroix (bass)
João Donato (piano)
Phillip Doyle (tuba)
Claude Egéa (trumpet)
Laurent Faucheux (drums)
Michel Feugère (saxophone, trumpet)
Frederic Gaillardet (piano)
Luis Galvão (guitar)
Gilberto Gil (vocals)
Alain Hatot (flute, saxophone)
Didier Havet (rombone)
Jorge Helder (bass)
Denis Leloup (trombone)
Eduardo Morelenbaum (clarinet)
Jaques Morelenbaum (cello)
Katia Pierre (flute)
Hugo Vargas Pilger (cello)
Iura Ranevsky (cello)
Rob Reddy (saxophone)
Saul Rubin (guitar)
Marcello Isdebski Salles (cello)
Henri Salvador (vocals, percussion)
Paulo Sérgio Santos (clarinet)
Eric Seva (saxophone)
Billy Jay Stein (organ)
Caetano Veloso (vocals)
Jean-Christophe Vilain (trombone)
André Villéger (flute, saxophone)
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violone(violin:
Ricardo Amado – Rick Amado – Paul Prates Barbato – Michel Bessler – José Alves Da Silva – Daniel Guedes – Antonella Pareschi – Eduardo Pereira – Paschoal Perrota – Felipe Prazeres – Rogério Rosa – Maria Christine Springuel – Ricardo Taboada
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background vocals:
Jerry Barnes – Stephanie McKay

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Tracklist:
01. La Vie C’est La Vie (Salvador) 2.24
02. Mourir à Honfleur (Salvador) 3.48
03. Dans Mon Île (Pon/Salvador) 4.56
04. Cherche La Rose (feat. Caetano Veloso) (Salvador) 4.57
05. L’ ‘Amour Se Trouve au Coin de la Rue (Salvador) 3.27
06. Tu Sais Je Vais T’Aimer (Jobim/de Moraes) 4.04
07. J’Aurais Aimé (Salvador) 2.37
08. Italie (Un Tableau de Maître) (Martinico/Salvador) 3.11
09. D’Abord (Salvador) 2.57
10. Les Amours Qu’on Delaisse (Salvador) 5.17
11. Alleluia! Je l’Ai Dans La Peau (Salvador) 2.50
12. Les Dernières Hirondelles (Salvador) 3.21
13. Tu Sais Je Vais T’Aimer (feat: Gilberto Gil) (Jobim/de Moraes) 4.05

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Henri Salvador (18 July 1917 – 13 February 2008)

Walter Wanderley – Sucessos Dançantes Em Ritmo De Romance (1961)

FrontCover1.jpgWalter Wanderley (born Walter Jose Wanderley Mendonça, 12 May 1932 – 4 September 1986) was a Brazilian organist and pianist, best known for his lounge and bossa nova music and for his instrumental version of the song Summer Samba which became a worldwide hit.

Wanderley was born in Recife, Brazil. Already famous in his native country by the late 1950s, he became an internationally renowned star in the mid-1960s through his collaboration with the singer Astrud Gilberto.

He recorded six albums on the Verve label between 1966 and 1968. Three of those albums, Rain Forest, Cheganca and Astrud Gilberto’s A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness, were with a trio consisting of Wanderley, Claudio Slon (drums) and Jose Marino (bass) and were produced in the United States by Creed Taylor, who initially brought the trio to the U.S. to record at the persuasion of Tony Bennett. Wanderley’s U.S. recording of Summer Samba reached No. 26 on the Billboard charts in the summer of 1966.[2] Another album recorded during that period was Popcorn, in collaboration with the Brazilian singer-guitarist Luiz Henrique Rosa. Around that same period Wanderley also established the Carnival with Bob Matthews, João Palma, José Soares, and Janis Hansen; all former members of Sérgio Mendes’ Brasil ’66.

WalterWanderley01After the trio disbanded (though they were briefly reunited in 1971 for “The Return of the Original” on Canyon Records), Wanderley himself continued to record albums on Verve, A&M/CTI, and GNP Crescendo. During that time, he also made numerous personal appearances, including a concert tour of Mexico.

Wanderley was known for his distinctive staccato stuttering style and mastery of the Hammond B-3 organ and on later recordings and during live concerts a L Series Hammond. His later career was blighted by alcoholism and he died in relative obscurity of cancer in 1986 in San Francisco, California, aged 54.

He was married to Isaurinha Garcia, one of the most popular singers in Brazil. He is the grandfather of Brazilian actor and singer Rickkie. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a real beutiful album from his early days. What a great organ … but a superb saxophon and uitar, too.

And if you like orga music (like me), than it´s time to discover the one and only Walter Wanderley!

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Personnel:
Walter Wanderley (organ)
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a bunch of unknown studio musicians

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Tracklist:
01. E Daí ? (Proibição Inútil e Ilegal) (Gustavo) 2.34
02. O Apito do Samba (Bandeira) 3.22
03. Gimba (Kaszas/Guarnieri) 2.28
04. Io (Migliacci/Modogno) 2.37
05. Baby Rock (Nisa) 2.48
06. Quem É ? (Magalhães/Navarro)
07. Oh! Carol (Howard Greenfield/Neil Sedaka) 2.58
08. Perfume de Gardenia (Hernandez) 3.16
09. Quero Beijar-te as Mãos (de Carvalho/Faisal) 2.18
10. A Noite do Meu Bem (Duran) 2.26
11. Fim de Caso (Duran) 2.43
12. Castigo (Duran) 2.49

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WalterWanderley03Walter Wanderley (12 May 1932 – 4 September 1986)

João Gilberto – Same (1961)

FrontCover1Here is the third album in João Gilberto’s trilogy of blueprints for Bossa Nova, following his celebrated 1959 debut, Chega de Saudade and it’s sequel, O amor, o sorriso e a flor (Love, a Smile and a Flower).

Produced by Antonio Carlos Jobim and Walter Wanderley, the album combines a splendid Bossa Nova repertoire of Jobim, Vinicius de Moraes and Carlos Lyra originals with Gilberto’s interpretations of songs from Brazil’s musical past.

The performances of these enchanting songs display the full range of João Gilberto’s singular style; the intimate voice and his innovative, linear approach to the guitar that revolutionized Brazilian music and the international pop scene.

On this album João Gilberto was accompanied by Walter Wanderley (orgn) and hisgroup.

And it´s another highlight in the long career of the one and only João Gilberto.

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Personnel:
João Gilberto (vocals, guitar)
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The Walter Wanderley Group

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Tracklist:
01. Samba da minha terra (Caymmi) 2.21
02. O barquinho (Menescal/Bôscoli) 3.21
03. Bolinha de papel (Pereira) 1.19
04. Saudade da Bahia (Caymmi) 2.16
05. A primeira vez (Marçal/Bide) 1.52
06. O amor em paz (Jobim/de Moraes)
07. Você e eu (Carlos Lyra – Vinicius de Moraes) 2.31
08. Trem de Ferro-Trenzinho (Maia) 1.51
09. Coisa mais linda (Lyra/de Moraes) 2.52
10. Presente de natal (Noronha) 1.54
11. Insensatez (Jobim/de Moraes) 2.26
12. Este seu olhar (Jobim) 2.14

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João Gilberto – Chega De Saudade (1959)

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Influential Brazilian musician João Gilberto has died aged 88.

The singer and composer was known best as a pioneer of the bossa nova genre, which found international popularity in the 1960s.

Reports say Gilberto died at home in Rio de Janeiro after a period of illness. His son confirmed the news of his death in a Saturday Facebook post.

“His fight was noble, he tried to maintain dignity,” Marcelo Gilberto said. )BBC)

João Gilberto Prado Pereira de Oliveira, known as João Gilberto (Portuguese: [ʒuˈɐ̃w ʒiwˈbɛʁtu]; 10 June 1931 – 6 July 2019), was a Brazilian singer, songwriter, and guitarist. He pioneered the musical genre of bossa nova in the late 1950s.

João Gilberto was born in Juazeiro, Bahia, the son of Joviniano Domingos de Oliveira, a wealthy merchant, and Martinha do Prado Pereira de Oliveira. He lived in his native city until 1942, when he began to study in Aracaju, Sergipe, returning to Juazeiro in 1946. At the age of 14, he got his first guitar, given by his father. Still, in Juazeiro, he formed his first band, called “Enamorados do Ritmo”. He moved to Salvador, Bahia in 1947. During his three years in the city, he dropped out of his studies to dedicate himself exclusively to music and at the age of 18 began his artistic career as a crooner at the Rádio Sociedade da Bahia.

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Gilberto’s first recordings were released in Brazil as two-song 78-rpm singles between 1951 and 1959. In the 1960s Brazilian singles evolved to the “double compact” format, and João would release some EPs in this new format, which carried four songs on a 45-rpm record.

Soon afterward, Gilberto’s father, upset by his son’s bizarre singing style and refusal to take ‘normal’ work, had him committed to a mental hospital. In a psychological interview there, Gilberto stared out of the window and remarked “Look at the wind depilating the trees.” The psychologist replied “but trees have no hair, João”, to which Gilberto responded: “and there are people who have no poetry.” He was released after a week. The next year (1956), he returned to Rio and struck up old acquaintances, most significantly with Antônio Carlos Jobim, who was by then working as a composer, producer, and arranger with Odeon Records. Jobim was impressed with Gilberto’s new style of guitar playing and set about finding a suitable song to pitch the style to Odeon management.

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Gilberto was known for his demanding acoustic and noise-control standards. During a recording session of the song “Rosa Morena”, he insisted on 28 takes to get the pronunciation of the o in “Rosa” just right.[8] Nonetheless, despite his high acoustic standards, he skipped a contractually required sound check prior to a July 2003 performance at the Hollywood Bowl, in Los Angeles. This negligence (and the ensuing sound fiasco) prompted the audience to stream from the venue before the concert ended.

In 1997, Gilberto sued record label EMI over their reissue of several of his early works, which he contended had been poorly remastered. According to The New York Times, “A statement by his lawyer at the time declared that the reissues contained sound effects that ‘did not pertain to the original recordings, banalizing the work of a great artist.” Following the incident, EMI ceased production of the albums in question, and, as of 2008, the lawsuit was yet to reach a decision.

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In 2000, Gilberto won the nomination for the Best World Music Album category in the 42nd Annual Grammy Awards for his work in the album João Voz E Violão.

In 2011, he was sued and evicted from an apartment in Leblon by his landlord, Countess Georgina Brandolini d’Adda.

On 17 May 2017, Gilberto received an honorary doctorate in music from Columbia University though he himself did not attend the commencement ceremony.[14]

It was reported in December 2017 that Bebel Gilberto (Isabel), João’s daughter through his marriage to Miúcha, was seeking control of his financial affairs because of his declining mental state and heavy indebtedness.

João Gilberto died on 6 July 2019, in Rio de Janeiro.

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Chega de Saudade is the debut album by Brazilian musician João Gilberto and is often credited as the first bossa nova album. The title can be translated roughly as “enough longing”, though the Portuguese word saudade carries with it more complex meaning.

In 2001, the album was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In the same year, it was made an inaugural member of the Latin Grammy Hall of Fame. It was listed by Rolling Stone Brazil as the fourth best Brazilian album in history.

By the time of the album’s release, newspaper O Estado de S. Paulo stated that Gilberto “is one of the most musical of our popular singers, a certainty which broadly compensates for his lack of volume. In this regard, it is worth noting his interpretation of ‘Desafinado’. Besides, he reveals an unorthodox good taste for the choice of melodies recorded in this first LP and a sobriety in interpretation we have rarely observed”. (by wikipedia)

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João Gilberto’s debut LP, 1959’s Chega de Saudade, was one of the most important bossa nova recordings, and credited by many as the album that, more than any other, launched bossa nova as a major popular music genre. The dozen songs add up to a surprisingly short playing time of about 23 minutes, but introduce several of bossa nova’s most beloved trademarks: breezy, soothing melodies and vocals; tight arrangements with seamless blends of clipped guitar strokes and light orchestration, and, of course, the bossa nova rhythm. The most popular of these songs (“Chega de Saudade” and “Desafinado”) had already been released as singles in 1958, but though they might be the most memorable tracks, the album maintains a consistently high standard (if a fairly similar mood throughout).  (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Milton Banana (drums)
Rubens Bassini (percussion)
Copinha (flute)
João Gilberto (guitar, vocals)
Antonio Carlos Jobim (piano)
Edmundo Maciel (trombone)
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Garotos da Lua (background vocals on 04.)

 

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Tracklist:
01. Chega de Saudade (Jobim/de Moraes) 2.00
02. Lobo Bobo (Lyra/Bôscoli) 1.21
03. Brigas, Nunca Mais (Jobim/de Moraes 2.06
04. Hô-bá-lá-lá (Gilberto) 2.16
05. Saudade Fez um Samba (Lyra/Bôscoli) 1.48
06. Maria Ninguém (Lyra) 2.23
07. Desafinado (Mendonça/Jobim) 1.58
08. Rosa Morena (Caymmi) 2.05
09. Morena Boca de Ouro (Barroso) 1.58
10. Bim Bom (Gilberto) 1.16
11. Aos Pés da Cruz (Pinto/da Zilda) 1.34
12. É Luxo Só (Barroso/Peixoto) 1.58

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Stan Getz & Astrud Gilberto – Getz Au Go Go (1964)

LPFrontCover1Getz Au Go Go is a live album by American saxophonist Stan Getz and his quartet, featuring bossa nova singer Astrud Gilberto. It was recorded during two concerts in 1964 and released on Verve the same year as V6-8600. (by wikipedia)

Although the name Stan Getz (tenor sax) was initially synonymous with the West Coast cool scene during the mid-to-late 1950s, he likewise became a key component in the Bossa Nova craze of the early 1960s. Along with Astrud Gilberto (vocals), Getz scored a genre-defining hit with the “Girl From Ipanema,” extracted from the equally lauded Getz/Gilberto (1963). While that platter primarily consists of duets between Getz and João Gilberto (guitar/vocals), it was truly serendipity that teamed Getz with João’s wife Astrud, who claims to have never sung a note outside of her own home prior to the session that launched her career. Getz Au Go Go Featuring Astrud Gilberto (1964) was the second-to-last album that he would issue during his self-proclaimed “Bossa Nova Era” — the final being Getz/Gilberto #2 [Live] (1964) concert title from Carnegie Hall.

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In many ways, that is a logical successor to this one, as both include the “New Stan Getz Quartet.” The band features a young Gary Burton (vibraphone), Kenny Burrell (guitar), Gene Cherico (bass), and Joe Hunt (drums). As is typical with jazz, there are a few personnel substitutions, with Helcio Milito (drums) and Chuck Israels (bass), respectively, filling in on nearly half the effort. As the name of the disc intimates, this recording hails from the venerable Greenwich Village venue, the Café Au Go Go, in mid-August of 1964 — AstrudGilbertotwo months after “Girl From Ipanema” became a Top Five pop single. However, the focus of Getz Au Go Go steers away from the Brazilian flavored fare, bringing Astrud Gilberto into the realm of a decidedly more North American style. That said, there are a few Antonio Carlos Jobim compositions — “Corcovado (Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars)” and “One Note Samba” — both of which would be considered as jazz standards in years to follow — as well as the lesser-circulated “Eu E Voce.” Getz and crew gather behind Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein’s “It Might as Well Be Spring,” and the scintillating instrumental “Summertime,” from Porgy & Bess. Other equally engaging cuts include affective vocal readings of “Only Trust Your Heart,” and the diminutive, yet catchy “Telephone Song.” There is also some great interaction between Getz and Burton on “Here’s to That Rainy Day.” Getz Au Go Go is highly recommended for all dimensions of jazz enthusiasts. (by Lindsay Planer)

Tracks 4–7, 9–10 recorded on May 22, 1964; tracks 1–3 and 8 on October 9, 1964.

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Personnel:
Kenny Burrell (guitar)
Gary Burton (vibraphone)
Gene Cherico (bass)
Stan Getz (saxophone)
Astrud Gilberto (vocals)
Joe Hunt (drums)
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Chuck Israels (bass on 04., 09. – 10.)
Helcio Milito (drums on 01. – 03, 08.)

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Tracklist:
01. Corcovado (Jobim) 2.52
02. It Might As Well Be Spring (Rodgers/Hammerstein II) 4.28
03. Eu e Voce (Lyra/de Moraes) 2.33
04. Summertime (G.Gershwin/I.Gershwin) 8.13
05. Only Trust Your Heart (Carter/Cahn) 4.35
06. The Singing Song (Burton) 3.44
07. The Telephone Song (Menescal/Bôscoli/Gimbel) 2.05
08. One Note Samba (Jobim/Mendonca) 3.12
09. Here’s That Rainy Day (van Heusen/Burke) .6.12
10. 6-Nix-Pix-Flix (Burton) 1.09

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Richard Galliano (feat. Gary Burton) – L’Hymne à l’Amour (2007)

FrontCover1.jpgRichard Galliano studied piano and accordion at the age of 4 with his father Lucien Galliano, accordionist and teacher.
Particularly gifted and invested, he quickly entered the Nice Conservatory, directed at that time by organist Pierre Cochereau, and followed courses in harmony, counterpoint and trombone.
He won first prize in 1969 for this instrument.

He arrived in Paris in 1975 and met Claude Nougaro, becoming his friend, his accordionist and conductor until 1983.
The author and composer found each other. They get along beautifully.
From this close collaboration will be born many songs that are part of the heritage of French song, such as Allée des brouillards, Des voiliers,Vie Violence…

The second decisive meeting took place in 1980, with the Argentinean composer and bandoneonist Astor Piazzolla.
Astor strongly encouraged him to create the French “New Musette”, as he himself had
previously invented the Argentinean “New Tango”. (by

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This project sounds natural for vibist Gary Burton. But to imagine a vibraphonist playing with an accordonist – it seems only Burton could have pulled it off. Drummer Clarence Penn and bassist George Mraz provide sympathic support through this heavily romanticized material.

On the opening of Astor Piazolla´s “Milonga Is Coming” Gallianp´s subtle swept couches Burton´s quiet lines. Eventually joined by the rest of the group both solists weave in and out of the song´s dreamy, melancholy mood. The formal nature to this programm continues with Piazzolla´s spritely “Triunfal”.

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The song starts and stops, its moments of reflection balanced by the urge to move vigorously. On Bach´s “Sinfonia 11 In G-Moll”, Burton seems at home with the music´s counterpoint, as Galliano´s lead statement to this waltz alternates with the vibist´s soloing, this swing feel turning it into a lovely occasion for jazz.

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Ballads include the titel track and “Waltz For Debby”, which the group gives an uplifting arrangment. It´s a delight to hear such virtuosic improvisors together. Galliano and Burton have chops galore, but instead of showing off, they are seduced by the material. (by John Ephland)

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Personnel:
Gary Burton (vibraphone)
Richard Galliano (accordion)
George Mraz (bass)
Clarence Penn (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Milonga Is Coming (Piazzolla) 8.29
02. Triunfal (Piazzolla) 3.51
03. L’hymne à l’amour (If You Love Me) (Piaf/Monnot) 7.30
04. Sinfonia 11 In G-Moll, BWV 797 (Bach) 4.28
05. Soledad (Piazzolla) 6.59
06. Para Jobim (Galliano) 5.15
07. Operation Tango (Piazzolla) 8.28
08. Romance Del Diablo (Piazzolla) 5.50
09. Waltz For Debby (Evans/Lees) 5.55
10. Il Postino (Bacalov) 4.47

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Various Artists – A Twist Of Jobim (1997)

FrontCover1.jpgTwist of Jobim contains a single disc with 11 songs. The CD has an unusual multi-artist tribute to the music of Antonio Carlos Jobim. Some of the Twist of Jobim songs are made funky (but in a melodic and tasteful way), while others become quiet (but still passionate) ballads. Twist of Jobim are all jazz-oriented songs.

The debut release from the I.E. label (which is connected with Polygram) is an unusual multi-artist tribute to the music of Antonio Carlos Jobim. Some of his tunes are made funky (but in a melodic and tasteful way), while others become quiet (but still passionate) ballads. The treatments are all jazz-oriented, and there is plenty of solo space for the likes of guitarist Lee Ritenour (in one of his finest jazz efforts), pianists Dave Grusin and Alan Pasqua, altoist Eric Marienthal, bassist Christian McBride, and tenor saxophonist Ernie Watts. Plus, there are guest spots for Herbie Hancock (an excellent acoustic piano solo on “Stone Flower”), the sopranos of Art Porter (on “Dindi”) and Steve Tavaglione, the Yellowjackets (who team up with Ritenour on “Mojave”), singer El DeBarge (“Dindi”) and the vocal duo of Al Jarreau and Oleta Adams (“Waters of March” and a lightweight rendition of “The Girl from Ipanema”). Nearly every song holds one’s interest, the melodies are celebrated, and the fresh interpretations contain more than their share of surprises. (by Scott Yanow)

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Personnel:
Oleta Adams (vocals on 04. + 11.)
El DeBarge (vocals on 03.
John Beasley (synthesizer on 02. + 04.)
Paulinho da Costa (percussion on 01., 06., 07, 10. + 11.)
Melvin Davis (bass on 02., 03. + 07.)
Cassio Duarte (percussion on 02.- 05 + 09.)
Russell Ferrante (synthesizer on 06., piano on 10. + 11.)
Dave Grusin (piano on 01., 02., 04. + 05.)
Herbie Hancock (piano on 06.)
Jimmy Haslip (bass on 10.)
Jerry Hey (flugelhorn on 07., 08.)
Dan Higgins (flute on 01., 07. – 09.)
Al Jarreau (vocals on 04. + 11.)
Will Kennedy (drums on 10.)
Eric Marienthal (saxophone on 02., 04 – 07.)
Harvey Mason (drums on 02., 04., 08. + 09.)
Christian McBride (bass on 08., 09.)
Bob Mintzer (saxophone on 10.)
Gary Novak (drums on 06.)
Alan Pasqua (piano on 08. + 09.)
John Patitucci (bass on 06.)
Lee Ritenour (guitar on 01., 02., 04., 06. – 10., keyboards, synthesizer on 01., 03. 07., 11., bass on 01. + 11.)
Steve Tavaglione (saxophone on 06., electronic wind instrument on 08. + 09.)
Ernie Watts (saxophone on 08. + 09.)

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Tracklist:
01. Dave Grusin / Lee Ritenour: Water To Drink (Agua de Beber) (Jobim) 5.06
02. Dave Grusin / Eric Marienthal / Lee Ritenour: Captain Bacardi (Jobim) 5.05
03. El DeBarge / Art Porter: Dindi (Jobim) 4.57
04. Oleta Adams / Al Jarreau: Waters of March (Aguas de Março) (Jobim) 4.38
05. Dave Grusin: Bonita (Gilbert/Jobim/Santamaria) 4.04
06. Paulinho Da Costa / Herbie Hancock / Steve Tavaglione: Stone Flower (Jobim) 8.49
07. Eric Marienthal / Lee Ritenour: Favela (Gilbert/Jobim/de Moraes) 4.47
08. Alan Pasqua / Ernie Watts: Children’s Games (Jobim) 3.53
09. Christian McBride / Ernie Watts: Lamento (Jobim/de Moraes) 6.27
10. Lee Ritenour / Yellowjackets: Mojave (Jobim) 5.22
11. Oleta Adams / Al Jarreau: The Girl From Ipanema (Gimbel/Jobim/de Moraes) 429

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Sergio Mendes & Brasil ’66 – Look Around (1968)

FrontCover1.jpgLook Around is the third studio album by Sérgio Mendes and Brasil ’66. It was released in 1968.

Mendes and Brasil 66 performed the Oscar-nominated Burt Bacharach/Hal David song “The Look of Love”, one of their biggest hits, on the Academy Awards telecast in March 1968. The album was recorded at the Sunset Sound, Western Recorders, and Annex Studios, Hollywood. Brasil ’66’s version of “The Look of Love” quickly shot into the top 10, eclipsing Dusty Springfield’s version.

“Like a Lover”, an English-language version of “O Cantador”, was covered by Carmen McRae, Sarah Vaughan, Helen Merrill, Dianne Reeves, Al Jarreau, Natalie Cole, Jane Monheit, and Kimiko Itoh. “So Many Stars” was recorded by Heren Merrill, Tony Bennett, Sarah Vaughan, Jane Monheit, Barbra Streisand, Natalie Cole, and Stacey Kent

“Tristeza” was an instrumental by Lobo and Nitinho and the title track of Baden Powell’s Tristeza on Guitar album (1966). It was sung by Astrud Gilberto with lyrics by A. Testa on her Italian language album (1968). (by wikipedia)

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Sergio Mendes took a deep breath, expanded his sound to include strings lavishly arranged by the young Dave Grusin and Dick Hazard, went further into Brazil, and out came a gorgeous record of Brasil ’66 at the peak of its form. Here Mendes released himself from any reliance upon Antonio Carlos Jobim and rounded up a wealth of truly great material from Brazilian fellow travelers: Gilberto Gil’s jet-propelled “Roda” and Joao Donato’s clever “The Frog,” Dori Caymmi’s stunningly beautiful “Like a Lover,” Harold Lobo’s carnival-esque “Tristeza,” and Mendes himself (the haunting “So Many Stars” and the title track). Mendes was also hip enough to include “With a Little Help From My Friends” from the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper LP. As things evolved, though, the one track that this album would be remembered for is the only other non-Brazilian tune, Burt Bacharach’s “The Look of Love,” in an inventive, grandiose arrangement with a simplified bossa beat. The tune just laid there on the album until Mendes and company performed it on the Academy Awards telecast in 1968. The performance was a sonic disaster, but no matter; the public response was huge, a single was released, and it become a monster, number four on the pop charts. So much for the reported demise of bossa nova; in Sergio Mendes’ assimilating, reshaping hands, allied with Herb Alpert’s flawless production, it was still a gold mine. (by Richard S. Ginell)

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Personnel:
Lani Hall (vocals)
Janis Hansen (vocals)
Bob Matthews (bass, vocals)
Sérgio Mendes (keyboards)
João Palma (drums)
John Pisano (guitar)
José Soares (percussion, vocals)
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unknown Orchestra arranged and conducted by Dave Grusin & Dick Hazard

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Tracklist:
01. With A Little Help from My Friends (Lennon/McCartney) 2.39
02. Roda (Gil/Augusto) 2.27
03. Like A Lover (Caymmi/Motta/A.Bergman/M.Bergman) 3.56
04. The Frog (A Rã) (Donato) 2.46
05. Tristeza (Goodbye Sadness) (Lobo-Niltinho) 2.58
06. The Look Of Love (Bacharach/David) 2.46
07. Pra Dizer Adeus (To Say Goodbye) (Lobo/Neto/Hall) 3.09
08. Batucada (The Beat) (MValle/P.Valle) 2.23
09. So Many Stars (Mendes/A.Bergman/M.Bergman) 4.31
10. Look Around (Mendes/A.Bergman/M.Bergman) 3.01

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