Georges Brassens – No. 1 (1re série) (1954)

FrontCover1Georges Brassens (22 October 1921 – 29 October 1981) was a French singer-songwriter and poet.

He wrote and sang, with his guitar, more than a hundred of his poems, as well as texts from many others such as Victor Hugo, Paul Verlaine, or Louis Aragon. In 1967, he received the Grand Prix de Poésie of the Académie française.

Between 1952 and 1976, he recorded fourteen albums that include several popular French songs such as Les copains d’abord, Chanson pour l’Auvergnat, La mauvaise réputation, and Mourir pour des idées. Most of his texts are black humour-tinged and often anarchist-minded.

Brassens rarely performed abroad. His lyrics are difficult to translate, though attempts have been made.[3] He accompanied himself on acoustic guitar. Most of the time the only other accompaniment came from his friend Pierre Nicolas with a double bass, and sometimes a second guitar (Barthélémy Rosso, Joël Favreau).

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His songs often decry hypocrisy and self-righteousness in the conservative French society of the time, especially among the religious, the well-to-do, and those in law enforcement. The criticism is often indirect, focusing on the good deeds or innocence of others in contrast. His elegant use of florid language and dark humor, along with bouncy rhythms, often give a rather jocular feel to even the grimmest lyrics. (by wikipedia)

And here´s his first EP from 1954 … what a great piece of music … George Brassens was a very unique musician !

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Personnel:
George Brassens (vocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Leparapluie (Brassens) 2.30
02. Il ny a pas damour heureux (Brassens/Aragon) 2.31
03.  Jai rendez – vous avec vous (Brassens) 2.08
04. La chasse aux papillons (Brassens) 2.06

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Milva – Tango (1968)

FrontCover1Maria Ilva Biolcati (born 17 July 1939), known as Milva [ˈmilva], is an Italian singer, stage and film actress, and television personality. She is also known as La Rossa (Italian for “The Redhead”), due to the characteristic colour of her hair, and additionally as La Pantera di Goro (“The Panther of Goro”), which stems from the Italian press having nicknamed the three most popular Italian female singers of the 1960s, combining the names of animals and the singers’ birth places. Popular in Italy and abroad, she has performed on musical and theatrical stages the world over, and has received popular acclaim in her native Italy, and particularly in Germany where she has often participated in musical events and televised musical programmes. She has also released numerous albums in France, Japan, Korea, Greece, Spain and South America.

She has collaborated with European composers and musicians such as Ennio Morricone in 1965, Francis Lai in 1973, Mikis Theodorakis in 1978 (Was ich denke became a best selling album in Germany), Enzo Jannacci in 1980, Vangelis in 1981 and 1986, Franco Battiato in 1982 and 1986.

Her stage productions of Bertolt Brecht’s recitals and Luciano Berio’s operas have toured the world’s theatres. She has performed at La Scala in Milan, at the Deutsche Oper in Berlin, at the Paris Opera, in the Royal Albert Hall in London, and at the Edinburgh Festival, amongst others.

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Having received success both in Italy and internationally, she remains to this day one of the most popular Italian personalities in the fields of music and theatre. Her artistic stature has been officially recognised by the Italian, German and French republics, each of which have bestowed her with the highest honours. She is the only Italian artist in contemporary times, in fact, who is simultaneously: Chevalier of the National Order of the Legion of Honour of the French Republic (Paris, 11 September 2009), Commander of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic (Rome, 2 June 2007), Officer of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany (Berlin, 2006) and Officier of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (Paris, 1995).

In 1968, Milva released her fifth studio album, Tango, an album that consisted of tango standards sung in Italian. The album was released in Italy, Germany, Spain and Brazil and featured an orchestra conducted by Iller Pattacini. (by wikipedia)

And here´s this beautiful album … if you like Tango music combined with a real strong and erotic voice … than you should listen ….

Milva was one of the greatest singers from Italy ! Believe me !

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Personnel:
Milva (vocals)
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Iller Pattacini Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. La Cumparsita (Questo Tango) (Rondinella/Rodriguez) 3.20
02. A Media Luz (Guardando Intorno A Te) (Lonzi/Donato) 2.36
03. Bandoneon Arrabalero (Il Cantastorie Col Bandoneon) (Bachica/Contursi/Bertini) 2.43
04. Inspiracion (La Mia Vita Cambiera) (Paulus/Rondinella) 3.30
05. Cielo Azzurro (Stanotte Sognero) (Rixner) 3.57
06 Adios Muchachos (Vodani/Sanders) 3.02
07. Duelo Criollo (La Donna Del Buono A Nulla) (Rezzano/Bayardo) 3.01
08. Rodriguez Pena (Rodriguez Morirai) (Rondinella/Juan/Vicente) 2.47
09. El Choclo (All’osteria) (Villoldo) 3.01
10. Blue Tango (Il Diario Sa) (Rondinella/Anderson/Parish) 2.50
11. Poema (So Cho Nol Cielo) (Bianco/Melfi) 3.16
12. Adios, Pampa Mia (Canaro/Pelay/Larici/Mores) 4.17

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Jeanne Moreau – Same (1963)

FrontCover1Jeanne Moreau is an icon of the French cinema who also experienced a streak of success as a vocalist during the 1960s. Born on January 23, 1928, in Paris, she broke into the film industry during the 1950s, appearing most notably in a pair of 1958 films by Louis Malle, Ascenseur Pour l’Échafaud and Les Amants. Following her breakthrough success in these films, she appeared in a long line of others by prominent directors, most notably François Truffaut, who immortalized her in his classic Jules et Jim (1962), as well as Jean-Luc Godard (A Woman Is a Woman, 1961), Michelangelo Antonioni (La Notte, 1961), Orson Welles (The Trial, 1962), Luis Buñuel (Diary of a Chambermaid, 1964), Rainer Werner Fassbinder (Querelle, 1982), and Wim Wenders (Until the End of the World, 1991). Moreau’s recording career as a vocalist was sparked by her memorable performance of the song “Le Tourbillon” in Jules et Jim. Released as a 45-rpm single by Philips in 1962, “Le Tourbillon” was written by Cyrus Bassiak (born Serge Rezvani). The full-length album Jeanne Moreau (1963), comprised of a dozen songs by Rezvani, was released on the Disques Jacques Canetti label in the wake of “Le Tourbillon.” Subsequent silver-screen singing performances of note include the songs “Embrasse-Moi,” a Bassiak song from the film Peau de Banane (1963), and “Ah les P’tites Femmes de Femmes de Paris,” a duet with Brigitte Bardot from the film Viva Maria (1965). There was also another full-length album of Bassiak songs released on Disques Jacques Canetti, 12 Chansons (1966).

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Moreau’s two full-lengths were later compiled by the British label Él on The Immortal Jeanne Moreau (2008). Numerous other best-of collections were compiled over the years, most of them featuring soundtrack recordings such as “Le Tourbillon” alongside material from her full-lengths. (by Jason Birchmeier)

Throughout her life, Moreau maintained friendships with prominent writers such as Jean Cocteau, Jean Genet, Henry Miller and Marguerite Duras (an interview with Moreau is included in Duras’s book Outside: Selected Writings). She was formerly married to Jean-Louis Richard (1949–1964) and then to American film director William Friedkin (1977–1979). Director Tony Richardson left his wife, Vanessa Redgrave, for her in 1967 but they never married. She also had affairs with directors Louis Malle and François Truffaut, fashion designer Pierre Cardin, jazz trumpeter Miles Davis and Theodoros Roubanis, the Greek actor/playboy.

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Moreau was a close friend of Sharon Stone, who presented a 1998 American Academy of Motion Pictures life tribute to Moreau. Orson Welles called her “the greatest actress in the world”, and she remained one of France’s most accomplished actresses.

Moreau died on 31 July 2017, at the age of 89. (by wikipedia)

And here´s her first album … a tribute to a real great actress … and we hear very fine chansons from France … of course. Enjoy the magic of Jeanne Moreau !

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Personnel:
Jeanne Moreau (vocals)
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François Rauber Orchestra
Ward Swingle Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. J’Ai La Mémoire Qui Flanche (Bassiak/Rauber) 2.23
02. La Vie S’Envole (Bassiak/Delerue) 1.34
03. La Peau, Léon (Bassiak/Delerue) 2.24
04.  Rien N’Arrive Plus (Bassiak/Robert) 3.10
05. Moi Je Préfère (Bassiak/Swingle) 2.01
06. Le Blues Indolent (Bassiak/Swingle) 3.21
07. La Vie De Cocagne (Bassiak/Robert) 2.33
08. L’Homme D’Amour (Bassiak/Swingle) 2.37
09. L’Horloger (Bassiak/Swingle) 2.34
10. Ni Trop Tôt, Ni Trop Tard (Bassiak/Swingle) 2.41
11. Les Mensonges (Bassiak/Swingle) 2.17
12. L’Amour Flou (Bassiak/Delerue) 2.15

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Jeanne Moreau (23 January 1928 – 31 July 2017)

Paolo Conte – Aguaplano (1987)

frontcover1Paolo Conte’s star was on the rise throughout the ’80s, yet at the same time that his ineffable stage persona was triumphing all over Europe, his records from the period — while always eminently enjoyable — were becoming slightly less consistent than before. Benefiting from the break granted by his 1985 live release Concerti, Conte sounds definitely inspired in Aguaplano, his first studio album in three years and a strong contender for his best work ever. The only double album in Conte’s discography, Aguaplano is logically the longest, but paradoxically one of the most focused projects of his entire career. One of the main reasons for this is Renzo Fantini’s production,which wisely maintains a similar instrumental palette for the entire record. Compared with previous records such as Appunti di Viaggio and Paolo Conte [1994], the sound of Aguaplano seems stripped down to the bare essentials. Backed up by the familiar rhythm section of Ares Tavolazzi, Ellade Bandini, and Jimmy Villotti, Conte’s trademark piano and vocal stylings take center stage in virtually every song. Impeccable horn arrangements render this already impressive set positively exquisite. Rather than individual efforts, Conte’s songs in Aguaplano seem conceived as parts of an organic suite of sketches or miniatures. There may not be any immediately recognizable hits in Aguaplano, but that is a consequence of its uniform quality of mood and content. This is the rare double album worth listening to in its entirety, where the sum is greater than the parts. Which is not to say that, taken individually, the songs are not of the highest Conte standard: “Anni,” “Blu Notte,” “Gratis,” “Ratafià,” “Les Tam-Tam du Paradis…” — it is almost unfair to look for highlights in such a cohesive collection, one that seems to get better with every listening. If anything, in another rare occurrence for a double album, the second disc is probably superior to the first.

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Everything feels in the right place in Aguaplano, from the songwriting and arrangements down to the album art and track sequencing: it cannot be a coincidence that the record is bookended by its two greatest moments, “Aguaplano” and “Jimmy Ballando.” The title track functions as a film’s opening shot, zooming in from an airplane high in the air to discover the baffling spectacle of a concert piano floating at sea, a fitting welcome to a secret universe where music and sensuality (or rather, the languid sensuality derived from this kind of music) prevail over logic. The last song, “Jimmy Ballando” is a comic masterpiece in which Conte and his buddy Jimmy, two aged playboys drowsy after a pantagruelic meal, attempt for old times’ sake a last dancehall seduction. Alas, their failing eyesight impedes them in seeing that the women they invite over are Chinese, killing off any possibility of verbal communication. Resigned, the two men content themselves with dancing with their unexpected partners. A brilliant farewell to the world introduced in Aguaplano, “Jimmy Ballando” represents the slow awakening from the slumber induced by a long journey of alcohol, smoke, and dancing, and the humorous realization that one may not be so young anymore, and certainly no longer in step with the times. Yet, much like the mood created by this album, it was magic while the illusion lasted. (by Mariano Prunes)

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Personnel:
Ellade Bandini (drums)
Paolo Conte (vocals)
Nando Francia (accordion)
Antonio Marangolo (saxophone, synthesizer)
Stefano Pastor (violin)
Marie-Françoise Pélissier (cello)
Ares Tavolazzi (bass)
Paolo Tocco (clarinet)
Marco Jimmy Villotti (guitar)
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background vocals:
Cristina Rossi – Holly Pearson

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Tracklist:
01. Aguaplano  4.00
02. Baci Senza Memoria 3.14
03. Languida 2.14
04. Paso Doble 2.55
05. Dopo Le Sei 3.20
06. Max 3.45
07. Blu Notte 4.20
08. La Negra 2.43
09. Hesitation 3.42
10. Ratafià 2.56
11. Nessuno Mi Ama 4.40

All songs written by Paolo Conte

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Iris Romen – Vintage Gal Hour (2012)

FrontCover1Looking at the cover photo, you could be excused for thinking “Vintage Gal Hour” is an album from the Golden Fifties. A classically-cut dress, a bow around the waist and a headband in the hair, eyes gazing longingly into the distance – that is how IriS Romen presents herself on the cover of her debut solo album. The pose in retro-look is a stylistic reference to the sound that awaits us behind the CD’s cellophane – with its invocation of music genres from decades gone by, it also has an anachronistic feel to it at first. Does IriS Romen have a place in the present at all, with her revisiting of the vintage sound of past epochs? But of course! And how! Because let’s be honest – don’t we all have a little of this lovable little Dutch girl in us just longing to get out? Doesn’t she appeal to all our yearnings for yesteryear and the undeniable advantages it had? In a word: yes! In an age of emotionally detached, fully digitised technology, she strikes straight at the heart with her genuine, hand-made songs.

IrisRomen01Her heart-warming music with the old-vinyl feel satisfies that hunger for true emotions so pervasive today, and that makes it modern and up-to-the-minute. What IriS Romen has recorded here in Berlin together with producer Johnny Bluth (Johnny Trouble Trio) and her musician friends over a period of almost two years and using old analogue equipment reveals a profound knowledge of the 50s and 60s. We hear Old-Time Country in a style reminiscent of Kitty Wells (“You Stole My Heart”) and Loretta Lynn (“Growing Pains”), are highly entertained by the nostalgically jazzy (“I Found You In Fall”), delight in string sounds à la Hank Marvin of The Shadows (“Tabou”) and encounter twang guitars like the ones from those old Spaghetti Westerns (“Dance With Me”). But the best thing about the songs is that IriS Romen doesn’t simply rinse and repeat the influences of her idols, she recreates them again from scratch in her own imagination. Despite numerous quotes and cross-references, “Vintage Gal Hour” is completely and utterly IriS Romen. She wrote all the tracks on this solo album herself and is blessed with a wonderful, natural, unmistakable voice that renders pointless any comparisons with stars from the past.

IrisRomen02Iris Romen discovered at a very early age that the music from the early 20th century struck a chord in her. She would sing along ardently when her father put on LPs at home, and she loved doing famous musicals in school performances. It was experiences like those that led, in her teenage years, to her resolve to make singing her career one day. After graduating school she studied jazz vocalisation with Janice Lakers at the Maastricht music academy and classical singing with Marie-José Van De Beuken, while also financing private lessons with vocal coach Anne Bruning by working in a supermarket (where she once even served André Rieu). During this phase, her love of old jazz emerged.

She also came to know and love the Brecht interpretations of Kurt Weill, Paul Dessau and Hanns Eisler during this time, and was introduced to the world of Jump ‘n’ Jive, Rock ‘n’ Roll and Rhythm ‘n’ Blues as a guest singer in Ray Collins’ Hot Club. In 2004, IriS Romen, who had by then also learned how to play the double bass, moved to the German capital where she still lives today. Saturdays she takes the packed Clärchens Ballhaus, the historical dance hall that Quentin Tarantino used as a set in “Inglourious Basterds”, through rousing dance evenings as the lead vocalist of the Ballhaus Band. She also broadens her spectrum as a member of the girl group The Runaway Brides (often to be seen supporting BossHoss) and Ben Becker’s background band. Now the time is ripe for an international solo career. “I believe in the timelessness of everything that is done and viewed with the heart.” That is what IriS Romen says of her solo debut. On it she strikes exactly the tone of her favourite ages, while remaining on the cutting edge of the present with every note. Very few manage that balancing act, but on “Vintage Gal Hour” Iris Romen succeeds immaculately. (by grooveattack.com)

Oh, Iris … let me be your strange boy ….

Booklet01APersonnel:
Ricco Baader (guitar)
Sascha Bachmann (drums)
Felix Berchthold (guiar)
Christian Betancourt (percussion)
Johnny Bluth (guitar, harmonica, glockenspiel, drums, percussion)
Dalai Cellai (cello)
Matthias Geserick (bass)
Iris Romen (vocals, guitar, piano, glockenspiel, bass, cowbell)
Tall Tony (bass)

Booklet08ATracklist:
01. Dance With Me 3.37
02. Love Catastrophe 1.33
03. You Stole My Heart 2.39
04. Clouds 4.52
05. Iris’ Song 3.20
06. Bird Of Freedom 2.35
07. Tabou 3.14
08. Starnight 3.34
09. I Found You In Fall 2.19
10. Strange Boy 4.06
11. Growing Pains 2.45
12. Last Song 11.34

All songs written by Iris Romen

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Various Artists – Café de Paris – 40 Classic French Café Songs (2014)

FrontCover140 essentialrecordings evoking the charm of Paris´ café s and boulevards.

Over two hours of timeless songs and classic instrumentals featuring Maurice Chavalier, Edith Piaf, Tino Rossi, Jean Sablon, Juliette Gréco, Josephine Baker, Django Reinhardt, Stephane Grappelli and more …

A marvellous compendium of classic French recordings. I admit to being obsessed with France, its’ culture and its’ history. This set has been “played to death” since it arrived. I challenge any lover of France and French life to listen to this in the garden on a warm summer evening with some wine and cheese, and for them to not be mentally transported to a culture and way of life so different to the UK. (by Gremlin)

But: I have to dedicate this entry to all the victims of the terror attack yesterday on Friday, the 13th.

TerrorInParis02Let´s listen to this music as a sign of hope I know I´m a dreamer, but I´m not the only one

ParisTracklist:

CD 1:
01. Charles Trenet: Boum! (Trenet/Breton) 2.34
02. Édith Piaf: L’Accordéoniste (Emer) 3.15
03. L’Accordéoniste: Under The Bridges Of Paris (Scotto/Coulon/Marcuse) 2.25
04. Maurice Chevalier: Dites-Moi ma mère (Yvain/Willemetz) 3.08
05. Café accordien du Paris: Pigalle (Ulmer/Luypaerts/Koger) 3.18
06. Juliette Gréco: Accordeon (Gainsbourg) 2.22
07. Josephine Baker: Chiquita madame (Misraki/Barro) 2.47
08. Charles Trenet: Douce France (Trenet) 3.10
09. Jean Sablon feat. Django Reinhardt & Stephane Grappelli: Un amour comme le nôtre (Borel/Clerc) 3.06
10. Josephine Baker: De temps en temps (Homez/Misraki) 3.21
11. Tino Rossi: Guitare D’amour (Schmidseder/Potérat) 3.10
12. Juliette Gréco: Guinguettes (Stern/Bacri) 2.49
13. Frederic Lombert: Gigi (Lerner/Loewe) 2.51
14. Daniel Deauville: I Love Paris (Porter) 2.37
15. Charles Trenet: Le grand café (Trenet) 2.12
16. Édith Piaf: Les mômes de la cloche (Scotto/Decaye/Fortin) 3.21
17. L’Accordéoniste: C’est Magnifique (Porter) 2.14
18. Jean Sablon feat. Django Reinhardt & Stephane Grappelli: Cette chanson est pour vous (Life is a song) (Ahlert/Young/Varna/Cabridens) 3.11
19. Tino Rossi: J’attendrai (Olivieri/Rastelli/Potérat) 2.51
20. Josephine Baker: Besame mucho (Rivera) 3.21

CD 2:
21. Maurice Chevalier: Mimi (Rodgers/Hart) 2.24
22. Nathalie et Guillaume: Je t’aime (Gainsbourg) 5.01
23. Charles Trenet: La mer (Trenet/Lasry) 3.23
24. Édith Piaf: Elle a dit (Becaud/Piaf) 3.50
25. Orchestre Cinema: The Summer Knows (Legrand) 3.41
26. Juliette Gréco: La chanson de Margaret (Verschueren/Dumarchey) 4.43
27. Maurice Chevalier: Ah si vous connaissiez ma poule (Willemetz/Toche/Borel-Clerc) 3.21
28. Josephine Baker: Les mots d’amour (Borel-Clerc) 2.52
29. Charles Trenet: Verlaine (Trenet/Verlaine) 3.24
30. Édith Piaf: Chante moi (Chauvigny/Piaf) 3.22
31. S B Playes: Petite Fleur (Bechet) 3.42
32. Tino Rossi: Tant qu’il y aura des etoiles (Scotto/Hornez/Vendresse) 3.06
33. Maurice Chevalier: La choupetta (Paiva/Jararaca/Battaille) 2.54
34. Jean Sablon feat. Django Reinhardt & Stephane Grappelli: Prenez garde au grand méchant loup! (Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf?) (Churchill/Ronell) 2.37
35. Josephine Baker: Si J’étais blanche (Lelievre/Varna/Falk) 2.44
36. Luc Montrose: Love Is Blue (Popp/Cour) 2.45
37. Paris Express: Chanson D’amour (Shanklin) 2.46
38. Juliette Gréco: Java Partour (Ferre) 2.59
39. Maurice Chevalier: Oui papa (Everybody loves my girl) (Abrahams/Young/Lewis) 2.10
40. Jean Sablon: Rythme du bal continental (The Continental) (Conrad/Magidson) 3.02

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“Once again we’ve seen an outrageous attack to terrorize innocent civlians,” Obama said, adding that it is an “attack on all of humanity and the universal values we share.”

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Edith Piaf – Mylord + Je sais comment (1959)

FrontCover1When one thinks of Edith Piaf, one thinks of love, sorrow and music. One did not breathe without the other two. Born in Paris practically on the streets on December 19, 1915, she struggled from day one, the daughter of street performers. The mother, a singer, eventually abandoned both Edith and her father for a solo career. Piaf spent her youth entertaining passers-by, receiving little formal education in the process. She often accompanied her father’s acrobat street act with her singing and at various times was forced to live with various relatives, in alleys or in cheap hotels. An aborted love affair left her with a baby girl at age 17, but little Marcelle died of meningitis at 2 years old. Devastated, Piaf returned to the streets she knew, now performing solo.

EdithPiaf01Her fortunes finally changed when an impresario, Louis Leplee, mesmerized by what he heard, offered the starving but talented urchin a contract. He alone was responsible for taking her off the streets at age 20 and changing her name from Edith Gassion to “La Mome Piaf” (or “Kid Sparrow”). Piaf grew in status entertaining in elegant cafés and cabarets and became a singing sensation amid the chic French society with her throbbing vocals and raw, emotional power. From 1936 Piaf recorded many albums and eventually became one of the highest paid stars in the world. She was first embroiled in scandal when her mentor, Leplee, was murdered and she was held for questioning. She managed to survive the messy affair and carry on while her ever-growing society circle now began to include such elite members as writer/director Jean Cocteau. Piaf also took to writing and composing around this time; one of the over 80 songs she wrote included her signature standard, “La vie en rose.” Although she appeared sporadically in films, it was live audiences that sustained her.

EdithPiaf02Piaf later toured the United States to branch out internationally. America was slow to accept the melodramatic Piaf but she persevered and eventually won legions of fans. She also continued a series of affairs with the likes of actor Paul Meurisse, composer Henry Contet and, most notably, boxing champion Marcel Cerdan. The latter’s death in a 1949 plane crash left Piaf devastated and many claim this was the beginning of her downfall. Piaf had a life-long habit of involving herself heart and soul in the launching of her lovers’ careers. Over the years this would include Yves Montand’ and ‘Eddie Constantine. Two serious car accidents suffered in 1951 led to a morphine and alcohol addiction that left Piaf’s life skidding out of control despite a potentially happy marriage in 1952 to actor Jacques Pills. Though slowly crippled by severe arthritis, a series of spectacular comebacks in concert and recordings would follow over the years but her health would slowly waste her away. Her last appearance was at the Paris Olympia, racked and hunched over with pain and barely able to stand. Her last recorded song was “L’homme de Berlin” in 1963, the year of her death. She died in poverty on the same day as her friend Cocteau and at the age of 47, the same age as her equally tortured American counterpart, Judy Garland. Piaf left many debts for her second husband (and protégé) Theo Sarapo, who was twenty years younger (he died in 1970, at age 34). Piaf’s funeral was massive yet, because of her lifestyle, was forbidden a Mass. It was the only time since WWII that Parisian traffic was completely stopped. A museum was dedicated in her honor. Piaf remains the epitome of the French singer in heart, soul, style and passion; for many Piaf IS France. (by  Gary Brumburgh)

And this is one of her greatest hits … taken from my single collection … it´s a viny rip from the original single from 1959!

EdithPiaf03Personnel:
Edith Piaf (vocals)
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Robert Chauvigny Orchestra

BackCover1Tracklist:
01. Mylord (Moustaki/Monnot) 4.28
02. Je sais comment (Bouquet/Chauvigny) 3.22

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