Joe Dassin – Les Champs-Elysees (1969)

FrontCover1Joseph Ira Dassin (5 November 1938 – 20 August 1980) was an American-born French singer-songwriter.

Dassin was born in New York City to American film director Jules Dassin (1911–2008) and Béatrice Launer (1913–1994), a New York-born violinist, who after graduating from a Hebrew High School in the Bronx studied with the British violinist Harold Berkely at the Juilliard School of Music. His father was of Ukrainian-Jewish and Polish-Jewish extraction, his maternal grandfather was an Austrian-Jewish immigrant, who arrived in New York with his family at age 11.

He began his childhood first in New York City and Los Angeles. However, after his father fell victim to the Hollywood blacklist in 1950, he and his family moved from place to place across Europe.

JorDassin1Dassin studied at the International School of Geneva and the Institut Le Rosey in Switzerland, and graduated in Grenoble. Dassin moved back to the United States, where he attended the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan from 1957 to 1963, winning an undergraduate Hopwood Award for fiction in 1958 and earning a Bachelor of Arts in 1961 and a Master of Arts in 1963, both in Anthropology.

Moving to France, Dassin worked as a technician for his father and appeared as an actor in supporting roles, among others in a number of movies (three) directed by his father, including Topkapı (1964) in which he played the role of Josef. He met Valentin Teboul in Paris writing the famous Champs-Elysées Song in 1964.

On 26 December 1964, Dassin signed with CBS Records, making him the first French singer to be signed with an American record label.

JorDassin2By the early 1970s, Dassin’s songs were at the top of the charts in France, and he became immensely popular there. He recorded songs in German, Spanish, Italian, and Greek, as well as French and English. Amongst his most popular songs are “Les Champs-Élysées” (Originally “Waterloo Road”) (1969), “Salut les amoureux” (originally “City of New Orleans”) (1973), “L’Été indien” (1975), and “Et si tu n’existais pas” (1975).

Joe Dassin has appeared in the following movies:

1957 : He Who Must Die, by Jules Dassin : Benos
1958 : The Law (1959 film), by Jules Dassin : Nico
1964 : Topkapi (film), by Jules Dassin : Joseph
1965 : Lady L, by Peter Ustinov : police inspector
1965 : Nick Carter and Red Club, by Jean-Paul Savignac : Janos Adler
Joe Dassin with his parents, Jules Dassin and Béatrice Launer, in Paris in 1970.

Dassin married Maryse Massiéra in Paris on 18 January 1966. Their son Joshua was born two and a half months early on 12 September 1973, and died five days later. Overcome by grief, Joe became deeply depressed. Despite all their efforts, their marriage did not survive. In 1977, one year after their move to their newly built home in Feucherolles, just outside Paris, they divorced.

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Joe Dassin with Maryse Massiéra

On 14 January 1978, Dassin married Christine Delvaux in Cotignac. Their first son, Jonathan, was born on 14 September 1978; and their second son, Julien, arrived on 22 March 1980. Christine died in December 1995.

Dassin died from a heart attack during a vacation to Tahiti on 20 August 1980. He was survived by his two sons, both living in France, as well as his two younger sisters, Richelle (b. 1940) and Julie (b. 1945) and his parents Jules Dassin (1911–2008) and Béatrice Launer (1913–2005). His body is interred in the Beth Olam section of Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Hollywood, CA. (wikipedia)

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Joe Dassin with Christine Delvaux

Where Serge Gainsbourg was Paris to the core and would export his work in many different styles, Joe Dassin was imported from Brooklyn, New York and focused on bright French pop.

This third album was his commercial breakthrough on the strength of the title track—a Magazine1969Continental reworking of the Jason Crest tune “Waterloo Road”—that would pop up years later on the soundtrack to The Darjeeling Limited and as a drinking song in Russian nightclubs. Some compositions nod to his Jewish heritage via the onomatopoeia (“Siffler sur la colline”) and orchestration (“Le Chemin de papa”) of klezmer and Yiddish theater.

We also hear hints of the early rustic arrangements of The Kinks (“La Bande à Bonnot”), Brill Building songsmithing (“Sunday Times”), even the Parisian jazz legacy (“La Violette africaine”).

Sure, your modern sensibilities might detect kitsch on the surface of this LP, but trust us when we say this is no mere novelty (by Adam Blyweiss)

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Personnel:
Joe Dassin (vocals)
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Orchestra conducted by Johmmy Arthey
Orchestra conducted by John Musy (on 04.)

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Tracklist:
01. Le Chemin De Papa (Dassin/Delanoë) 2.31
02. Le Petit Pain Au Chocolat (Bigazzi/Delanoë/Del Turco) 3.26
03. Les Champs-Elysées (Deighan/Wilsh/Delanoë) 2.40
04. Siffler Sur La Colline (Pace/Thomas/Rivat/Pilat/Panzeri) 2.40
05. Mon Village Du Bout Du Monde (Dassin/Delanoë/Traditional) 3.21
06. Me Que – Me Que (Aznavour/Bécaud) 2.39
07. Ma Bonne Etoile (Pace/Panzeri/Delanoë) 2.40
08. Un Peu Comme Toi (Nash/Dassin) 3.00
09. La Bande A Bonnot (Thomas/Rivat/Dassin) 2.52
10. La Violette Africaine (J. Dassin/R. Dassin) 3.28
11. Le Temps Des Oeufs Au Plat (Lemesle/J. Dassin/R. Dassin) 2.54
12. Sunday Times (J. Dassin/R. Dassin) 2.22

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Mireille Mathieu – Sweet Souvenirs Of Mireille Mathieu (1968)

FrontCover1.JPGMireille from the beginning, was born to be a singer. As she would say, her professional career which began on the 21st of November 1965, has up to now for almost 40 years been “a fairy tale come true”. Born in Avignon and the eldest daughter from 14 children of Roger and Marcelle Mathieu, Mireille gave her first public performance when she was four years old for Midnight Mass! Her father who was a stonecutter for the cemetery possessed the voice of a tenor and had also dreamed of being a singer. As a child, Mireille saved her money from working in a factory so she could pay for singing lessons. A voice instructor named Laure Collière, accepted Mireille as a student. In her biography “Mon Credo”, during a time of distress she asked “that God please create a miracle” for her to arise out of poverty. In the early ’60s, French pop vocalist Johnny Hallyday’s manager Johnny Stark noticed Mireille’s enchanting vocalic beauty after appearing on the TV show “Jeu de la Chance” where she won 1st place. The American impressario later built Mireille into her own star after she signed a contract with him. With lots of hard work and many nights when she was only able to sleep four hours and she needed to do a concert, Mireille performed brilliantly and was on her way to success.

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She was quickly hailed as the next Édith Piaf and her 1965 performance run at the Paris Olympia, sparked her recording relationship with Barclay Records where her first album sold over 1 million copies in a very short time! Mireille with much stamina, forged ahead to make her career in France, Germany, the United States, Russia, and the rest of the world. In 1974, she won the German “Bambi” Music Award, which is the equivalent to the American Grammy Award.

In 1997, Mireille was nominated and given the “Chevalier de l’Ordre national du Mérite et des Arts et des Lettres” and decorated with “The Legion of Honor” for her service to the Nation of France.” Of her reception by Pope John Paul II, His Holiness has said, “She is the singer of love and peace.” For me, Mireille is “un cadeau d’ un Dieu” as her last name literally translates. (by J.K. Thompson)

And here´s a sampler from 68, including many of her early hits … The sparrow from Paris with this great voice !

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Alternate front + back cover (from Canada)

Personnel:
Mireille Mathieu (vocals)
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Christian Gaubert Orchestra (on 04. – 06., 09.)
Les Reed Orchestra (on 01., 03., 07.)
Paul Mauriat Orchestra (on 02., 10.)

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Tracklist:
01. Sometimes (Mason/Reed) 2.59
02. Alors Ne Tardes Pas (Bouquet) 2.42
03. Sweet Souvenirs de Stefan (Reed/v. Dyke) 3.12
04. Tu M’As Donné la Vie (Kaempfert/de la Noe) 2.37
05.
C’est À Mayerling (Lai/Plante) 3.08
06. Meraviglioso (Modugno/Plante) 2.59
07. Les Bicyclettes de Belsize (Ithier/Reed) 3.20
08. Now That You Are Gone (Mason/Reed) 3.00
09. Tous les Amoureux (Gaubert/Dousset) 2.16
10. Une Rose au Cœur de L’Hiver (Reed/Dousset) 3.01
11. Tous les Violons de Vienne (Lai/Plante) 2.36
12. Au Revoir Daniel (Reed/v. Dyke) 3.12LabelB1

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Carla Bruni – Quelqu’un M’a Dit (2002)

FrontCover1Quelqu’un m’a dit is the debut album of Italian-French singer, model, and former First Lady of France Carla Bruni, released in 2003.Quelqu’un m’a dit (Someone told me) is the debut album of Italian-French singer, model, and former First Lady of France Carla Bruni, released in 2003.

Quelqu’un m’a dit debuted at number one on the French Album Chart, spending thirty-four non-consecutive weeks in the top ten. The album also reached the top ten in Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Portugal and Chile.
Three tracks appeared in Hans Canosa’s 2005 American film Conversations with Other Women (“J’en connais”, “Le plus beau du quartier”, and “L’excessive”), and the song “Le plus beau du quartier” was used in H&M’s Christmas 2006 commercial. The title track was played over the closing credits of Mensonges et trahisons et plus si affinités…, included on the (500) Days of Summer soundtrack released in 2009, and appeared in the 2010 Carte d’Or Muffin commercial. The song “Le Ciel Dans Une Chambre” also appeared in an episode of Skins, series 3.
The second track, “Raphaël”, is named for Bruni’s then-lover, philosophy professor Raphaël Enthoven,[3] with whom she had a son, Aurélien Enthoven, in 2001.
Bruni has further collaborated with the co-producer, Louis Bertignac, in 2005 duetting with him on the song “Les Frôleuses” on his new album. (by wikipedia)

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Carla Bruni is an Italian supermodel and this is her first album. Like Milla Jovovich’s debut, this caught everyone by surprise. It’s a very good effort, far beyond what one would have expected. It’s an acoustic and intimate album, and the songs are from her own harvest. She also plays guitar. The talented French guitarist Louis Bertignac produced the album. Although she’s Italian, most of the album is sung in French with some Italian touches, like in “Le Ciel Dans une Chambre.” The result is a kind and smooth album that mixes folk and chanson Française in equal parts. Although she’s not breaking any new ground, the result is compelling. (by Iván Adaime)

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Personnel:
Louis Bertignac (guitar, piano, percussion, organ, bass, oboe, mandolin)
Carla Bruni (vocals, guitar, percussion)
Vincent Catulescu (cello)
Régis Ceccarelli (drums)
Léna Fablet (violin)
Rachid Guissous (piano)
Roselyne Macario (viola)
Steve Shehan (percussion)
Laurent Vernerey (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Quelqu’un M’a Dit (Bruni/Carax) 2.46
02. Raphaël (Bruni) 2.26
03. Tout Le Monde (Bruni) 3.17
04. La Noyée (Ginsburg) 4.00
05. Le Toi Du Moi (Bruni) 3.21
06. Le Ciel Dans Une Chambre (Paoli/Bruni) 4.49
07. J’en Connais (Bruni) 2.35
08. Le Plus Beau Du Quartier (Bruni) 3.30
09. Chanson Triste (Bruni) 3.31
10. L’excessive (Bruni) 3.04
11. L’amour
12. La Dernière Minute (Bruni) 1.03

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CarlaBruni01.jpgThe nude side of Carla Bruni

France Gall – Live (Au Theatre des Champs Elysées) (1978)

FrontCover1France Gall (born Isabelle Geneviève Marie Anne Gall on 9 October, 1947 in Paris, France – died 7 January 2018) was an influential singer who performed for many decades. She notably represented Luxembourg in the 1965 Eurovision Song Contest with “Poupée de Cire, Poupée de Son”; that winning song was just one of many that she performed which had been written by Serge Gainsbourg. Her career spanned roughly forty years, primarily in France, but she was best known over the world for the songs she that performed in the 60s, many of them a part of the ye-ye style. She sang in both French and English.

Besides the highly successful “Poupée de Cire, Poupée de Son”, she also notably sung “Les Sucettes” and “Baby Pop”. In France, she was perhaps more known for the chanson songs she sang in the late-70s through the mid-80s, many of them written by her husband, Michel Berger, who died in 1992. In 1987, she had some additional international success with her Ella Fitzgerald tribute “Ella, elle l’a”. She still recorded music into the new millennium.

France Gall died on 7 january 2018 at age 70 in a hospital in Paris. (by www.last.fm)

PosterGall was seduced by Michel Berger’s music when she heard his song “Attends-moi” (“Wait for Me”) one day in 1973. During a later radio broadcast, she asked him for his opinion on songs which her then producer wanted her to record. Although he was disconcerted by the quality of the songs, there would be no question of collaboration.

Only six months later, in 1974, after she sang vocals on the song “Mon fils rira du rock’n’roll” on Berger’s new album, Gall’s publisher asked him, at her behest, to write for her. Gall had already made her mind up that “It will be him and nobody else”. In 1974, “La Déclaration d’amour” was to be the first in a long line of hits which marked a turning point in Gall’s career. Meanwhile, the two artists, whose affinities became more than musical, married on 22 June 1976. Since their marriage, Gall has only sung songs written by Berger.[15] They remained married until his death in 1992.

And here´s a good live-Album from 1978 with songs from Michel Berger … a typical Seventies production a perfect shwo with very good musisians and …  … what a beautiful voice !

Gall died of an infection complicated from cancer at the American Hospital of Paris, in Neuilly-sur-Seine, on 7 January 2018 at the age of 70

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Michel Berger & France Gall

Personnel:
Mary Lou Benoit (percussion)
France Gall (vocals)
Bonnie Johnson (drums)
Peggy Mitchell (bass)
Patti Quatro (guitar)
Colleen Stewart (piano)
Gail Thompson (saxophone)
Melissa Vardey (keyboards)
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Background vocals:

Florence Bertoux – Lisa Deluxe – Stella Vander
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strings:
Anne Etevenon – Béatrice Crenne – Marie-Rose Dumonteil – Sophie Cuvillier

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Tracklist:
01. Musique 4.55
02. Samba Mambo 3.24
03. Si Maman Si 3:05
04- Comment Lui Dire 3.20
05. Ce Soir Je Ne Dors Pas 3.02
06. La Déclaration 3.20
07. Ce Garçon Qui Danse 3.20
08. Je L’aimais 4.48
09. Chanson D’une Terrienne 6.20
10. Chanson Pour Consoler 2.20
11. La Chanson De Maggie 3.00
12. Ça Balance Pas Mal A Paris 2.30
13. Le Meilleur De Soi-même 3.55
14. Mais Aime-la 9.30
15. Présentation Des Musiciennes 5.40
16. Viens Je T’emmène 4.55
17. Quand On Est Enfant 1.47

All Songs written by MIchel Berger

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France Gall (9 October 1947 – 7 January 2018)

 

Barbara – Barbara a l’écluse (1959)

FrontCover1Monique Andrée Serf (June 9, 1930 – November 24, 1997), whose stage name was Barbara, was a French singer. She took her stage name from her grandmother, Varvara Brodsky, a native of Odessa, Russian Empire (now Ukraine). Her song “L’Aigle noir” sold 1 million copies in twelve hours.

Born in Paris to a Jewish family, Barbara was ten years old when she had to go into hiding during the German occupation of France in World War II. After the war ended, a neighborhood professor of music heard her sing and took an interest in helping her develop her talents. She was given vocal lessons and taught to play the piano, and eventually she enrolled at the Ecole Supérieure de Musique. Money was a problem and she gave up her musical studies to sing at “La Fontaine des Quatre Saisons,” a popular cabaret in Paris.

She was deeply scarred by the war and her family’s plight. The feelings of emptiness experienced during childhood showed in her songs, particularly “Mon Enfance”. She said in her uncompleted autobiography, Il était un piano noir (assembled from notes found after her death), that her father sexually abused her when she was ten and she hated him for that. He later abandoned the family.

Barbara06A tall person, Barbara dressed in black as she sang melancholy songs of lost love. From 1950 to 1952, after her father’s desertion of her family, she lived in Brussels, where she became part of an active artistic community. Her painter and writer friends took over an old house, converting it into workshops and a concert hall with a piano where she performed the songs of Édith Piaf, Juliette Gréco and Germaine Montero. However, her career evolved slowly and she struggled constantly to eke out a living.

Returning to Paris, she met Jacques Brel and became a lifelong friend, singing many of his songs. Later she met Georges Brassens, whose songs she began to use in her act and to record on her first album. In the 1950s, she sang at some of the smaller clubs and began building a fan base, particularly with the young students from the Latin Quarter. In 1957, she went back to Brussels to record her first single, but it was not until 1961 that she got a real break when she sang at the Bobino Music-Hall in Montparnasse. Dressed in a long black robe, she gave a haunting performance, but the Parisian critics said she lacked naturalness and was stiff and formal in her presentation. She continued to perform at small clubs, and two years later at the Théâtre des Capucines she succeeded with the audience and critics alike, singing new material she had written herself. From that point on, her career blossomed and she signed a major recording contract in 1964 with Philips Records.

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Influenced originally by songwriters Mireille and Pierre MacOrlan, she developed her own style and the writing of her own songs transformed her image into that of a unique singer-songwriter. In the 1960s, she wrote her landmark song, “Ma plus belle histoire d’amour c’est vous” (“My Most Beautiful Love Story Is You”), and others for which she remains famous such as “L’aigle noir”, “Nantes”, “La solitude”, “Göttingen” and “Une petite cantate.” These five songs plus “Dis, quand reviendras-tu?” were translated into German by Belgian-German singer-songwriter Didier Caesar. The song “Göttingen” (named after the German city of Göttingen) is said to have contributed more to post-war German–French reconciliation than any speech by a politician. On the 40th anniversary of the Elysée agreement, ex-chancellor Gerhard Schröder quoted from the song in his official speech in the Château de Versailles.

She returned to Bobino in 1964 for several sold-out performances. She performed at the Paris Olympia and other important venues in France, becoming one of her country’s most beloved stars. In 1965, she released the album Barbara chante Barbara, which became a critical and financial success, winning the Grand Prix du Disque of the Charles Cros Academy. At the award ceremony, Barbara tore her award into several pieces, giving a piece to each of her technicians as a sign of her gratitude.

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In 1969, she wrote the theme song “Moi, je me balance” for the film “La fiancée du pirate”. She announced that she would limit her concert singing, and in 1970 she made her acting début in the stage play Madame that proved to be a commercial flop. In 1971 she co-starred with Jacques Brel in a film he directed titled Franz. Two years later she starred in L’Oiseau rare directed by Jean-Claude Brialy. Her final film role came in 1975 in Je suis né à Venise by choreographer Maurice Béjart.

Barbara’s career remained active in the 1970s, with appearances on television variety shows with stars such as Johnny Hallyday and a tour of Japan, Canada, Belgium, Israel, the Netherlands and Switzerland. Through the 1980s, she continued to tour and to write songs; her album Seule was one of France’s top grossing releases of 1981. The next year she was awarded the Grand Prix du Disque in recognition of her contribution to French culture. She developed a close working relationship with rising film star Gérard Depardieu and his wife Élisabeth, collaborating on songs for film and records. In 1986 she went to New York City to perform on piano at the Metropolitan Opera with Mikhail Baryshnikov in a song and dance ballet presentation. She co-wrote the music for the stage play Lily Passion with Luc Plamondon, in which she co-starred with Depardieu. It told the story of a killer who murders someone each time he hears her sing.

In the latter part of the 1980s she became active in the fight against AIDS. She recorded SID’Amour à mort and gave out condoms at performances. In 1988 the government of France awarded her the Legion of Honour. Health problems impeded her performing and she began to devote time to the writing of her memoirs. However, she recorded another successful album in 1996—which sold over a million copies in twelve hours—before she died of respiratory problems in Neuilly-sur-Seine (a suburb of Paris), on November 24, 1997. She was interred in the family grave at the Cimetière de Bagneux in southwest Paris.

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In October 1953 she married Claude John Luc Sluys, a Belgian law student, but they separated in 1956. She wrote many very personal songs, “Nantes” about her father, “Une petite cantate” dedicated to her friend Liliane Bénelli, born Gnansia, who died in a car accident in 1965. Later in life, she wrote a song to her public “Ma plus belle histoire d’amour” and another about her musicians “Mes hommes”.

Barbara’s musical legacy is revealed in the writing of a number of singers, French-speaking and otherwise. A style referred to as “Nouvelle Chanson”, or “New Chanson”, artists such as Keren Ann, Benjamin Biolay, Coralie Clement, Emilie Simon, Daphné, Vincent Delerm and Tancrède are often cited as exponents of the updated style. One of the few English-speaking artists to cover her work is Marc Almond, whose version of “Amours Incestueuses” (“Incestuous Loves”) was released on his 1996 album “Absinthe”. The Anglo-French biographer David Bret, a close friend of Barbara, wrote at her behest “Les Hommes Bafoués”, a song about AIDS prejudice. Bret also adapted three of her songs, “Ma Plus Belle Histoire D’Amour”, “La Solitude”, and “Précy Jardin” into English for Barbara. These were taped in 1992, but so far have never been released. Maria del Mar Bonet, a Catalan singer made, in 1971, a cover of L’Aigle Noir in Catalan and made a success of it in Spanish-language countries. L’Aigle Noir has also been adapted and sung in Spanish, and Swedish (Rikard Wolff), and many times in Japanese, also with great success.

Rendez-vous avec : Barbara

Well-known contemporary artists such as New York based Martha Wainwright, Spanish singer-songwriter Conchita Mendivil (who both recently reprised “Dis, Quand Reviendras-tu?”, and Regina Spektor (with “Après Moi”), and London-based singer-songwriter Ana Silvera have reprised songs sung by Barbara. Marc Almond also released a version of Barbara’s “Amours incestueuses” in 1993. (by wikipedia)

This debut album was recorded live at the “L´ecuse” (a very well known traditional bar in Paris.)
And it´s such an intensive and intimate performance … one of the finest french “chanteuse” ever !

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Personnel:
Barabara (vocals, piano, accordeon)

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Tracklist:
01. La Femme D’Hector (Brassens) 2.40
02. Souvenance (Schlesser) 2.35
03. Il Nous Faut Regarder (Brel) 1.49
04. Un Monsieur Me Suis Dans La Rue (Chanois/Besse) 4.47
05. Les Amis D’Monsieur (Fragson) 2.09
06. Tais-Toi, Marseilles (Datin/Vidalin) 3.06
07. La Belle Amour (Poissonnier/Serf) 2.43
08. La Joconde (Braffort) 1.47
09. Les Sirènes (Sabouraud) 3.16

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Here´s a live performance from 1956 at the L’Écluse, Paris

Georges Brassens – No. 1 (1re série) (1954)

FrontCover1Georges Brassens (22 October 1921 – 29 October 1981) was a French singer-songwriter and poet.

He wrote and sang, with his guitar, more than a hundred of his poems, as well as texts from many others such as Victor Hugo, Paul Verlaine, or Louis Aragon. In 1967, he received the Grand Prix de Poésie of the Académie française.

Between 1952 and 1976, he recorded fourteen albums that include several popular French songs such as Les copains d’abord, Chanson pour l’Auvergnat, La mauvaise réputation, and Mourir pour des idées. Most of his texts are black humour-tinged and often anarchist-minded.

Brassens rarely performed abroad. His lyrics are difficult to translate, though attempts have been made.[3] He accompanied himself on acoustic guitar. Most of the time the only other accompaniment came from his friend Pierre Nicolas with a double bass, and sometimes a second guitar (Barthélémy Rosso, Joël Favreau).

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His songs often decry hypocrisy and self-righteousness in the conservative French society of the time, especially among the religious, the well-to-do, and those in law enforcement. The criticism is often indirect, focusing on the good deeds or innocence of others in contrast. His elegant use of florid language and dark humor, along with bouncy rhythms, often give a rather jocular feel to even the grimmest lyrics. (by wikipedia)

And here´s his first EP from 1954 … what a great piece of music … George Brassens was a very unique musician !

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Personnel:
George Brassens (vocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Leparapluie (Brassens) 2.30
02. Il ny a pas damour heureux (Brassens/Aragon) 2.31
03.  Jai rendez – vous avec vous (Brassens) 2.08
04. La chasse aux papillons (Brassens) 2.06

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Milva – Tango (1968)

FrontCover1Maria Ilva Biolcati (born 17 July 1939), known as Milva [ˈmilva], is an Italian singer, stage and film actress, and television personality. She is also known as La Rossa (Italian for “The Redhead”), due to the characteristic colour of her hair, and additionally as La Pantera di Goro (“The Panther of Goro”), which stems from the Italian press having nicknamed the three most popular Italian female singers of the 1960s, combining the names of animals and the singers’ birth places. Popular in Italy and abroad, she has performed on musical and theatrical stages the world over, and has received popular acclaim in her native Italy, and particularly in Germany where she has often participated in musical events and televised musical programmes. She has also released numerous albums in France, Japan, Korea, Greece, Spain and South America.

She has collaborated with European composers and musicians such as Ennio Morricone in 1965, Francis Lai in 1973, Mikis Theodorakis in 1978 (Was ich denke became a best selling album in Germany), Enzo Jannacci in 1980, Vangelis in 1981 and 1986, Franco Battiato in 1982 and 1986.

Her stage productions of Bertolt Brecht’s recitals and Luciano Berio’s operas have toured the world’s theatres. She has performed at La Scala in Milan, at the Deutsche Oper in Berlin, at the Paris Opera, in the Royal Albert Hall in London, and at the Edinburgh Festival, amongst others.

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Having received success both in Italy and internationally, she remains to this day one of the most popular Italian personalities in the fields of music and theatre. Her artistic stature has been officially recognised by the Italian, German and French republics, each of which have bestowed her with the highest honours. She is the only Italian artist in contemporary times, in fact, who is simultaneously: Chevalier of the National Order of the Legion of Honour of the French Republic (Paris, 11 September 2009), Commander of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic (Rome, 2 June 2007), Officer of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany (Berlin, 2006) and Officier of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (Paris, 1995).

In 1968, Milva released her fifth studio album, Tango, an album that consisted of tango standards sung in Italian. The album was released in Italy, Germany, Spain and Brazil and featured an orchestra conducted by Iller Pattacini. (by wikipedia)

And here´s this beautiful album … if you like Tango music combined with a real strong and erotic voice … than you should listen ….

Milva was one of the greatest singers from Italy ! Believe me !

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Personnel:
Milva (vocals)
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Iller Pattacini Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. La Cumparsita (Questo Tango) (Rondinella/Rodriguez) 3.20
02. A Media Luz (Guardando Intorno A Te) (Lonzi/Donato) 2.36
03. Bandoneon Arrabalero (Il Cantastorie Col Bandoneon) (Bachica/Contursi/Bertini) 2.43
04. Inspiracion (La Mia Vita Cambiera) (Paulus/Rondinella) 3.30
05. Cielo Azzurro (Stanotte Sognero) (Rixner) 3.57
06 Adios Muchachos (Vodani/Sanders) 3.02
07. Duelo Criollo (La Donna Del Buono A Nulla) (Rezzano/Bayardo) 3.01
08. Rodriguez Pena (Rodriguez Morirai) (Rondinella/Juan/Vicente) 2.47
09. El Choclo (All’osteria) (Villoldo) 3.01
10. Blue Tango (Il Diario Sa) (Rondinella/Anderson/Parish) 2.50
11. Poema (So Cho Nol Cielo) (Bianco/Melfi) 3.16
12. Adios, Pampa Mia (Canaro/Pelay/Larici/Mores) 4.17

LabelB1
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