Bronco – Ace Of Sunlight (1971)

FrontCover1Bronco were an English rock/country band signed to Island & Polydor Records 1969-1973.

Formed August 1969 by Jess Roden following his split from The Alan Bown Set, Bronco were signed to Island Records by Guy Stevens and, after initially recording tracks at Olympic Studios with him, recorded their first album – Country Home – at Island’s own Basing Street Studios during 1970 with the final mix being overseen by Paul Samwell-Smith. The group similarly recorded their second album Ace of Sunlight at Basing Street (1971) which was produced by the band and Richard Digby Smith.

Following a serious motorway accident between Cheltenham and Bristol (in which the group’s crew – Dick Hayes and Alan Stone – and drummer Pete Robinson and bass-player John Pasternak were badly injured) and a later, ill-fated West Coast of America tour, Roden left the band after a final British tour with label-mates Mott The Hoople and John Martyn in the spring of 1972 to start a solo career. Guitarist Robbie Blunt soon followed and the remaining members drafted in Paul Lockey on vocals (who Kevyn Gammond knew from Band of Joy) and Dan Fone on guitar. This incarnation of Bronco signed to Polydor and released one album, Smoking Mixture.

Bronco’s bass player John Pasternak died of a heart attack in September 1986. Led Zeppelin’s Robert Plant fronted a tribute event for Pasternak in December of that year that featured Plant and The Big Town Playboys, and concluded with an ensemble band featuring Plant, Jimmy Page on guitar and Jason Bonham on drums.

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Two Bronco tracks are featured on Island records compilation albums: “Love” appears on Bumpers released in 1970 and “Sudden Street” appears on El Pea (1971).

“Time Slips Away” was included on the Island Records compilation Meet On The Ledge, released as part of Island’s 50th anniversary in 2009.

Singer-songwriter Clifford T. Ward guests on their début album Country Home. Trevor Lucas sings back-up vocals on Ace of Sunlight. Both Ian Hunter and Mick Ralphs from Mott The Hoople also guest on Ace of Sunlight. (by wikipedia)
I loved most of the Island acts that I heard in the early 70’s (Free, Traffic, Fairport Convention, Spooky Tooth, etc.). Many of them were on A&M here in the States. Since Bronco apparently wasn’t on any State-side label, I didn’t hear them then, although based on my “buying trends” in those days … Can’t stop playing this disc since I’ve gotten it. Marvelous stuff that’s very evocative of what I remember about being great with most of those Island/A&M artists I loved then (and still do). Very nice vibe throughout. Wonderfully sung and played. Excellent songs like Sudden Street, and New Day Avenue. How could I have lived so long without these tunes spinning in my head? What a great, soulful voice Jess had! (by John S.)

In other words: A classic Island recording from this period … a forgotten jewels of British folk-rock … Listen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Robbie Blunt (guitar)
Kevyn Gammond (guitar)
John Pasternak (bass)
Pete Robinson (drums, percussion)
Jess Roden (vocals, guitar, harmonica, piano)
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Terry Allen (organ on 06.)
Paul Bennett (vocals on 02. + 07.)
Paul Davenport (piano on 03.)
Ian Hunter (piano on 01.)
Trevor Lucas (vocals on 02.)
Mik Ralphs (organ on 01.)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Amber Moon (Roden/Worth) 3.57
02. Time Slips Away (Blunt) 6.06
03. Some Uncertainty (Ward/Gammond) 3.39
04. 4 Woman (Ward/Gammond) 4.10
05. New Day Avenue (Roden/Worth) 6.34
06. Discernible (Gammond/Worth) 3.44
07. Sudden Street (Roden) 6.21
08. Joys & Fears (Roden/Worth) 3.37

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Guy Stevens & Richard Digby Smith (two very important persons for Island Records)

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Crosby, Stills & Nash – Same (1969)

FrontCover1Crosby, Stills & Nash is the first album by Crosby, Stills & Nash, released in 1969 on the Atlantic Records label. It spawned two Top 40 hit singles, “Marrakesh Express” and “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes,” which peaked respectively at #28 the week of August 23, 1969, and at #21 the week of December 6, 1969, on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. The album itself peaked at #6 on the Billboard Top Pop Albums chart. It was certified four times platinum by the RIAA for sales of over 4,200,000.Crosby, Stills & Nash is the first album by Crosby, Stills & Nash, released in 1969 on the Atlantic Records label. It spawned two Top 40 hit singles, “Marrakesh Express” and “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes,” which peaked respectively at #28 the week of August 23, 1969, and at #21 the week of December 6, 1969, on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. The album itself peaked at #6 on the Billboard Top Pop Albums chart. It was certified four times platinum by the RIAA for sales of over 4,200,000.

The album was a very strong debut for the band, instantly lifting them to stardom. Along with the Byrds’ Sweetheart of the Rodeo and The Band’s Music from Big Pink of the previous year, it helped initiate a sea change in popular music away from the ruling late sixties aesthetic of bands playing blues-based rock music on loud guitars. Crosby, Stills & Nash presented a new wrinkle in building upon rock’s roots, utilizing folk, blues, and even jazz without specifically sounding like mere duplication. Not only blending voices, the three meshed their differing strengths, David Crosby for social commentary and atmospheric mood pieces, Stephen Stills for his diverse musical skills and for folding folk and country elements subtly into complex rock structures, and Graham Nash for his radio-friendly pop melodies, to create an amalgam of broad appeal.

CSN3The album features some of their best known songs: “Helplessly Hoping”, “Long Time Gone” (a response to the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy), “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes” (composed for Judy Collins) and “Wooden Ships” (co-written with Paul Kantner of Jefferson Airplane).
Stills dominated the recording of the album. Apart from drums, handled by Dallas Taylor, he played nearly all of the instruments on the album. Nash played acoustic guitar on two tracks and Crosby rhythm guitar on a few. Stills played all the bass, organ, and lead guitar parts, as well as acoustic guitar on his own songs. “The other guys won’t be offended when I say that one was my baby, and I kind of had the tracks in my head,” Stills said.

The singles:
Singles

David Crosby bristled over the plan for “Long Time Gone” as he thought he should at least play rhythm guitar on his own song. Stills convinced him to go home for a while and when he returned Crosby was won over by the music track that Stills and Taylor had recorded. In a more recent interview, Crosby contradicted his earlier statement, stating that he had played guitar on the track.

The group performed songs from the album at the Woodstock Festival in August 1969. In late 1969 the group appeared on the Tom Jones TV show and performed “Long Time Gone” with Tom Jones sharing vocals.
This album proved very influential on many levels to the dominant popular music scene in America for much of the 1970s. The success of the album generated gravitas for the group within the industry, and galvanized interest in signing like acts, many of whom came under management and representation by the CSN team of Elliot Roberts and David Geffen. Strong sales, combined with the group’s emphasis on personal confession in its writing, paved the way for the success of the singer-songwriter movement of the early seventies. Their utilization of personal events in their material without resorting to subterfuge, their talents in vocal harmony, their cultivation of painstaking studio craft, as well as the Laurel Canyon ethos that surrounded the group and their associates, established an aesthetic for a number of acts that came to define the “California” sound of the ensuing decade, including the Eagles, Jackson Browne, post-1974 Fleetwood Mac, and others.

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On the cover the members are, left to right, Nash, Stills, and Crosby, for no particular reason, the reverse of the order of the album title. The photo was taken by their friend and photographer Henry Diltz before they came up with a name for the group. They found an abandoned house with an old, battered sofa outside, located at 815 Palm Avenue, West Hollywood, across from the Santa Palm car wash that they thought would be a perfect fit for their image. A few days later they decided on the name “Crosby, Stills, and Nash”. To prevent confusion, they went back to the house a day or so later to re-shoot the cover in the correct order, but when they got there they found the house had been reduced to a pile of timber.

Dallas Taylor can be seen looking through the window of the door on the rear of the sleeve. In the expanded edition, however, he is absent. The original vinyl LP was released in a gatefold sleeve that depicted the band members in large fur parkas with a sunset in the background on the gatefold (shot in Big Bear, California), as well as the iconic cover art. A long folded page inside displayed the album credits, lyrics, track listing, as well as a quasi-psychedelic pencil drawing.

In a contemporary review, Rolling Stone critic Barry Franklin called Crosby, Stills & Nash “an eminently playable record” and “especially satisfying work”, finding the songwriting and vocal harmonies particularly exceptional. Robert Christgau was less enthusiastic in The Village Voice: “I have written elsewhere that this album is perfect, but that is not necessarily a compliment. Only Crosby’s vocal on ‘Long Time Gone’ saves it from a special castrati award.”

In 2003, Rolling Stone ranked Crosby, Stills & Nash number 262 on their list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. (by wikipedia)

Inlet1

The Crosby, Stills & Nash triumvirate shot to immediate superstardom with the release of its self-titled debut LP, a sparkling set immortalizing the group’s amazingly close, high harmonies. While elements of the record haven’t dated well — Nash’s Eastern-influenced musings on the hit “Marrakesh Express” now seem more than a little silly, while the antiwar sentiments of “Wooden Ships,” though well-intentioned, are rather hokey — the harmonies are absolutely timeless, and the best material remains rock-solid. Stills’ gorgeous opener, “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes,” in particular, is an epic love song remarkable in its musical and emotional intricacy, Nash’s “Pre-Road Downs” is buoyant folk-pop underpinned by light psychedelic textures, and Crosby’s “Long Time Gone” remains a potent indictment of the assassination of Robert Kennedy. A definitive document of its era. (by by Jason Ankeny)

CSN4

Personnel:
David Crosby (vocals, guitar)
Graham Nash (vocals, guitar)
Stephen Stills (vocals, guitar, bass, keyboards, percussion)
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Cass Elliot (background vocals on 05.)
Jim Gordon – drums on 02.)
Dallas Taylor (drums)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Suite: Judy Blue Eyes (Stills) 7:25
02. Marrakesh Express (Nash) 2:39
03. Guinevere (Crosby) with Nash 4:40
04. You Don’t Have To Cry (Stills) Stills with Crosby & Nash 2:45
05. Pre-Road Downs (Nash) 3:01
06. Wooden Ships (Crosby/Kantner/Stills) 5:29
07. Lady Of The Island (Nash) 2:39
08. Helplessly Hoping (Stills) 2:41
09. Long Time Gone (Crosby) 4:17
10. 49 Bye-Byes (Stills) 5:16

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The story behind the song “Marrakesh Express”:

With 60s pop music going psychedelic, The Hollies’ Graham Nash wrote a song about the hippie trail in Morocco. But it had to wait till he teamed up with David Crosby and Stephen Stills.

By the late 60s, Morocco was fast becoming an essential stop-off point on the new hippie trail. It was a place frequented by seekers of all stripes, from travellers and the more adventurous tourists through to artists, writers, fashionistas and rock stars. They were all drawn by the exotica of this storied corner of North Africa, whose heady promise of spiritual enlightenment and hashish served to melt away the conventions of the West.

In 1966, Graham Nash made a pilgrimage of his own, one that sparked off one of his most famous songs. On holiday from his day job as leader of The Hollies, Nash bought himself a ticket and hopped aboard a train from Casablanca to Marrakesh. “I was in first class and there were a lot of older, rich American ladies in there, who all had their hair dyed blue,” Nash recalls today. “And I quickly grew bored of that and went back to the third class of the train. That was where it was all happening. There were lots of people cooking strange little meals on small wooden stoves and the place was full of chickens, pigs and goats. It was fabulous; the whole thing was fascinating.”

So rich was the experience that Nash poured it into a vivid piece of psychedelic pop: Marrakesh Express. Mellifluous, carefree and irresistibly catchy, the lyrics made reference to ‘animal carpet wall-to-wall’, ‘coloured cottons’ in the air and ‘charming cobras in the square’. But they also hinted at a vague sense of dissatisfaction with life, as if Nash was on some indefinable quest for something better. Particularly the lines: ‘Sweeping cobwebs from the edges of my mind/Had to get away to see what we could find.’

The song itself was written during The Hollies’ Yugoslavian tour of June 1967. It was one of a number of new tunes that showcased Nash’s outward growth as a songwriter as he attempted to steer The Hollies away from the confines of the singles market into the more lysergic, experimental realm of peers like The Beatles and The Byrds – though the rest of the band didn’t all share his vision. Initially reluctant to record Marrakesh Express _at all, The Hollies only got as far as cutting a backing track at Abbey Road in April 1968. Nash, who remembers that “it wasn’t very good”, explains that he’d written a bunch of similar songs at that point – among them _Lady Of The Island and Right Between The Eyes – which The Hollies weren’t moved by either.

It wasn’t just the tunes. Nash’s burgeoning interest in the counterculture and its lifestyle meant he was the only band member to embrace LSD and marijuana. Allied to the fact that King Midas In Reverse, one of his finest compositions, had only been a moderate hit, Nash sought a move away. “Yeah, it was obvious that my career with The Hollies was coming to an end,” he says.

Not that Nash hadn’t planned for the immediate future. On his first trip to LA with The Hollies, in June 1966, he’d been introduced to the Mamas & The Papas’ Cass Elliot, one of California’s leading scenesters. She in turn had introduced him to David Crosby, ace harmony singer and songwriter in The Byrds. “I’d been in a showbiz environment with The Hollies,” says Nash, “but Crosby and The Byrds weren’t like that. So there may have been a cultural difference, but there weren’t any musical differences with us. I knew he was serious as a heart attack about his music, that The Byrds were a great band and that the modal stuff I was attracted to in their music was mainly down to David. When Cass introduced us, it was instant friendship.”

Crosby and Nash would bump into each other regularly over the next couple of years and, by the summer of 1968, both men found themselves at a critical juncture in their respective careers. Ever the egotist, Crosby had been ousted from The Byrds less than 12 months earlier. And while Nash had already decided to quit The Hollies, Stephen Stills’ tenure in dynamic LA rockers Buffalo Springfield had also come to a close. Stills and Crosby had been jamming informally for months before Nash was invited into the fold. The rapport was sensational. Grounded by Stills’ masterful guitar playing and achieving lift-off with their gorgeous three-way harmonies, Crosby, Stills & Nash were suddenly a serious concern.

In November 1968, Nash officially left The Hollies, heading out to California and taking up temporary residence at Crosby’s place. When it came to selecting songs for their self-titled debut album, Nash revived Marrakesh Express. Easily the most ‘pop’ song in the CSN canon, it was recorded at Wally Heider’s LA studio in February ’69. Stills’ guitar races along at a clip, echoing the literal rush of Nash’s Casablanca train and imbuing the song with a wondrous sense of buoyant optimism. There’s a smattering of nonsensical wordplay to begin, before Nash begins to sing in his warmest tones, exhorting everyone to climb aboard. You can almost feel the sunset through the windows.

Issued in May 1969, the album marked out Crosby, Stills & Nash as America’s first great supergroup and provided the counterculture with its definitive soundtrack. Marrakesh Express was released as the lead-off single and made the Billboard Top 30. Over here it reached No.17 and remains the only UK Top 20 hit of CSN’s entire career. It’s a song that continues to run on in its creator’s heart.

“I thought it was a funny song when I wrote it,” says Nash. “It’s not the greatest song in the world, but people still really like it whenever we sing it live. Whenever we need a little light-hearted, uptempo thing, that’s what we reach for.”

NASH, CASH, BASH

The late 60s found country titan Johnny Cash at the very peak of his commercial fame, hosting a hit show on TV and scoring high with his celebrated live albums Johnny Cash At San Quentin and Johnny Cash At Folsom Prison. He also hosted regular gatherings with his songwriting chums at his home in Tennessee.

One night in January 1969, he invited Bob Dylan, Shel Silverstein, Joni Mitchell and Kris Kristofferson. “We’d have a big circle with people passing a guitar around,” recalls Kristofferson. “I remember Graham Nash there with Joni Mitchell and nobody knew who he was. We thought he was just Joni’s boyfriend. Then he picked up the guitar and sang Marrakesh Express. Man, he knocked everybody out with that song.” (by teamrock.com)

Traffic – Live At Santa Monica (VHS-rip) (1972)

FrontCover1Traffic left behind precious few concert videos in any form, so this show, from the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, is an intrinsically valuable document of the band, even though it does feature a later lineup: Steve Winwood, Jim Capaldi, Chris Wood, Rebop Kwakubaah, Roger Hawkins, and David Hood. Chronologically, the show comes roughly a year later than the Welcome to the Canteen album. At 65 minutes running time, they include “The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys,” “John Barleycorn,” “Rainmaker,” “Glad,” “Freedom Rider,” “Forty Thousand Headmen,” and “Dear Mr. Fantasy,” all of which are worthwhile although also curiously lacking in the urgency that one would hope for in a concert performance. There are some many wonderful shots of the band members from varied angles and all kinds of different lighting, even within the same song, courtesy of video producer Taylor Hackford (White Nights, Against All Odds) but, in fact, this wasn’t the ideal version of the group to capture on stage: Winwood had suffered a serious illness the year before, the group was always in a state of flux as far as its line-up was concerned, and they were entering the period of decline that would coincide with the recording of Shootout at the Fantasy Factory. The musicianship is there, found intact in the thick electric guitar textures of “Light Up or Leave Me,” Winwood’s acoustic guitar performance on “John Barleycorn,” and Wood’s spotlighted flute and sax work on “Rainmaker.”

Traffic01
But one also gets the sense that a lot of excitement was disappearing for the players, apart from Rebop Kwaku Baah, in what Winwood later described as a grind of touring and recording. It’s not a bad video, and well worth tracking down as a document of the group; the sound is very good (especially for the period in which it was recorded), and it would make a good DVD, but one wishes a full-length video of a show from perhaps a year, or two, or three earlier could have found its way into existence. Originally available through RCA Columbia, but packaged by Pacific Arts, this long out of print video was apparently owned by Island Records, and may have reverted to them, which means that it is now somewhere in MCA’s vast holdings of the Polygram Records conglomerate (which bought Island); finding a used copy or getting someone to dub off the laser disc might be easier than waiting for it to be rediscovered by its current owners. (by Bruce Eder)

Chris Wood

Personnel:
Reebop Kwaku Baah (percussion)
Jim Capaldi (percussion, vocals)
Roger Hawkins (drums)
David Hood (bass)
Steve Winwood (guitar, keyboards, vocals)
Chris Wood (saxophone, flute, organ)

BackCover.jpg

Tracklist:
01. The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys (Capaldi/Winwood) 13.48
02. Light Up Or Leave Me Alone (Capaldi) 6.35
03. John Barleycorn (Traditional) 5.32
04. Rainmaker (Capaldi/Winwood) 8.35
05. Glad (Winwood) / Freedom Rider (Capaldi/Winwood) 14.05
06. Forty Thousand Headmen (Capaldi/Winwood)
08. Dear Mr. Fantasy (Capaldi/Winwood/Wood) 8.10

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Lindisfarne – Fog On The Tyne (1971)

FrontCover1Fog on the Tyne is a 1971 album by English rock band Lindisfarne. Bob Johnston produced the album, which was recorded at Trident Studios in the summer of 1971. It was released on Charisma Records in Great Britain and Elektra Records in America.

It gave the group their breakthrough in the UK, topping the album charts early in 1972 for four weeks and remaining on the chart for 56 weeks in total. “Meet Me on the Corner”, one of two songs written by bassist Rod Clements, reached No. 5 as a single. The title track became the band’s signature tune. Simon Cowe made his debut as a writer, contributing the song “Uncle Sam”.

Both tracks on the B-side of “Meet Me on the Corner”, “Scotch Mist” (an instrumental), and “No Time To Lose”, appeared as bonus tracks when the album was reissued on CD.

A heavily reworked version of the title track with vocals by footballer Paul Gascoigne was released in October 1990 under the title “Fog on the Tyne (Revisited)”, credited to Gazza and Lindisfarne. It reached number two in the UK Singles Chart.

Reggae group The Pioneers recorded a version of “Alright on the Night” on their 1972 album “I Believe in Love”. (by wikipedia)

Lindisfarne

Lindisfarne’s second album, Fog on the Tyne fulfilled and expanded on the promise of their debut, offering a brace of memorable folk-rock (or, perhaps more properly, acoustic rock) songs that were compared favorably with Bob Dylan’s work and that of the Band, and even the Sweetheart of the Rodeo-era Byrds, among others, without ever sounding like any of them. “Meet Me on the Corner” and “Fog on the Tyne” are the two best-known songs here, but there’s plenty else that’s their equal, including “Uncle Sam” and “Together Forever.” The only cautionary element to the album was its short running time, an indicator that perhaps the group was being pressed to hard to get records out too, quickly. (by Bruce Eder)

Single front + back cover:

SingleFC+BC

Personnel:
Rod Clements (bass, guitar, violin)
Simon Cowe (guitar, mandolin, vocals)
Alan Hull (vocals, guitar, keyboards)
Ray Jackson (vocals, mandolin, harmonica)
Ray Laidlaw (drums)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Meet Me On The Corner (Clements) 2.40
02. Alright On The Night (Hull) 3.34
03. Uncle Sam (Cowe) 2.58
04. Together Forever (Noakes) 2.36
05. January Song (Hull) 4.16
06. Peter Brophy Don’t Care (Hull/Morgan) 2.50
07. City Song (Hull) 3.08
08. Passing Ghosts (Hull) 2.30
09. Train in G Major (Clements) 3.10
10. Fog on the Tyne (Hull) 3.26
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11. Scotch Mist (Clements/Cowe/Hull/Jackson/Laidlaw) 2.08
12. No Time To Lose (Hull) 3.17

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Press release:

Press Release

Melanie – Arabesque (1982)

FrontCover1A very pleasant guitar driven album. “Detroit or Buffalo” sounds as beautiful with her as it does with writer Barbara Keith. There’s an odd reggae number in “When you’re dead and gone”. I hate reggae but I love Melanie, so, after ten spins, let’s say I accepted the song. Country music is represented by “It don’t matter now”. Chip Taylor (yes, he of “Angel of the morning” – made famous by Merrillee Rush – and “Wild thing” – eternized by The Troggs and Jimi Hendrix) nods his way in with “Any way that you want me”. “Roadburn” is rock; “Fooling yourself” is pop with a nice gospel-like choir. “Chances” closes the album in chord progression grandeur. It was 1982 and Melanie made a varied, but synergic album. Lovely. (by S. V. Gomeson)

“Arabesque” (1982) is, hands-down, one of Melanie’s best albums. That she could consistently put out such great, commercial product and get overlooked is one of the saddest unsolved mysteries of modern music. When it was originally released in the U.S, it was on a small, independent label called Blanche Records. In the U.K. and Europe it was on RCA Records. Great combination of original songs mixed with excellent cover material. Fine musicianship and, of course, Melanie’s wonderful vocals in an understated production (by Charles)

Alternate frontcover:

AlternateFrontCover

Personnel:
Melanie Safka (voclas, guitar)
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a bunch of unknown studio musisicians

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Tracklist:
01. Detroit Or BuffaloA1 Detroit Or Buffalo (Keith) 3.48
02. It Don’t Matter Now (McDonald) 3.12
03. Any Way That You Want Me (Taylor) 4.32
04 .Roadburn (Safka) 3.15
05 .Fooling Yourself (DeVitto) 3.46
06. Too Late (Safka) 4.21
07. Standing On The Other Side (Of Your Love) (Safka) 4.13
08. Love You To Loath Me (Safka) 3.20
09. When You’re Dead And Gone (Safka) 3.05
10. Imaginary Heroes (Evans) 4.36
11. Chances (Russell) 3.33

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The singles from this album:

Singles

Paul Simon – Paul Simon’s Concert In The Park (1991)

FrontCover1Paul Simon’s Concert in the Park is a live album released in 1991 by Paul Simon. It provided a survey of his two most recent albums, Graceland and Rhythm of the Saints, and also drew liberally from his earlier songbook including a number of tunes from the Simon and Garfunkel era. 600,000 people were initially claimed to have attended the show, which was held in Central Park, New York City on August 15, 1991.[1] The concert was similar to The Concert in Central Park, a reunion concert for Simon and Garfunkel held ten years earlier. The album was released on the 50th birthday of Art Garfunkel. (by wikipedia)

Ten years after playing a free concert in New York’s Central Park with Art Garfunkel, Paul Simon returned, backed by the New York session musicians and the native musicians from South Africa and Brazil who had enlivened his solo work. The show was PaulSimon01filmed and recorded, and the audio release was a 23-track double-disc set running nearly two hours. Half the selections came from his Graceland and The Rhythm of the Saints albums, but unlike the Graceland Tour of 1987, the Born at the Right Time Tour of 1991 made room for Simon’s earlier solo work as well as a few Simon & Garfunkel songs. Simon made such stylistically various material work together by front-loading the set with the newer stuff and rearranging some of the older solo stuff, so that “Kodachrome,” for example, was refitted with a guitar line courtesy of Graceland player Ray Phiri. (Wisely, except for a becalmed Africanization of “Cecilia,” Simon didn’t monkey with the S&G songs, most of which came at the end of the set.) But Simon also toned down the Brazilian percussion that had dominated the Saints material and sang it more convincingly, so that “Born at the Right Time,” for example, was far more effective than it had been in its studio version. On the whole, then, Concert in the Park managed to be an enjoyable and surprisingly cohesive career summary. (by William Ruhlmann)

CentralParl

Personnel:
Mingo Araujo (percussion)
Cyro Baptista (percussion)
Chris Botti (trumpet)
Michael Brecker (saxophone)
Tony Cedras (piano, keyboards, accordion)
Dom Chacal (Percussion)
Steve Gadd (drums)
Sidinho Moreira (percussion)
Vincent Nguini (guitar)
Ray Phiri (guitar)
Barney Rachabane (saxophone, pennywhistle)
Armand Sabal-Lecco (bass)
John Selolwane (guitar)
Paul Simon (vocals, guitar)
Richard Tee (piano)
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background vocals:
The Waters:
Oren Waters – Maxime Waters – Julia Waters

Special guests: Briz, Grupo Cultural OLODUM and Chevy Chase join Paul, dancing to “You Can Call Me Al”.

Booklet03A

Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. The Obvious Child 4.39
02. The Boy in the Bubble 4.49
03. She Moves On 6.26
04. Kodachrome 4.13
05. Born At The Right Time 5.12
06. Train In The Distance 4.45
07. Me And Julio Down By The Schoolyard 3.14
08- I Know What I Know 3.14
09. The Cool, Cool River 5.41
10. Bridge over Troubled Water 5.16
11. Proof 5.39

CD 2:
01. The Coast 7.06
02. Graceland 5.31
03. You Can Call Me Al 5.10
04. Still Crazy After All These Years 3.42
05. Loves Me Like A Rock 2.54
06. Diamonds On The Soles Of Her Shoes 9.30
07. Hearts And Bones 6.17
08. Late In The Evening 4.45
09. America 3.23
10. The Boxer 4.18
11. Cecilia 3.24
12. The Sound Of Silence 5.45

All Songs written by Paul Simon

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The Waters

 

Joni Mitchell – Night Ride Home (1991)

FrontCover1Night Ride Home is the fourteenth album by Canadian singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell, released in 1991. It was the last of four albums she recorded for Geffen Records.

Songs on the album include “Cherokee Louise” about a childhood friend who suffered sexual abuse, “The Windfall (Everything For Nothing)” about a maid who tried to sue Mitchell, and the retrospective single release “Come in from the Cold” about childhood and middle age. The title song “Night Ride Home” (originally titled “Fourth of July” and first performed during promotion for her previous album in 1988) was inspired by a moonlit night in Hawaii.  Though the album contained no charting singles, the track “Come in From the Cold” received airplay on AOR stations.

This was Mitchell’s first album not to be distributed by the WEA family of labels. She had been signed to WEA’s Asylum and Reprise labels in the past, and Warner Bros. Records had been the distributor for Geffen Records from 1980 to 1990. That year, Geffen was sold to MCA Music (now Universal Music Group), as a result, the album was distributed by Uni Distribution Corp. (the distribution arm of MCA Music), which also took over the rest of the Geffen catalogue.

A home video release, Come In From The Cold, was released the same year and features promo videos for five tracks from the album along with an interview with Mitchell discussing the inspiration behind them.

As of December 2007, the album has sold 238,000 copies in the US to date. (by wikipedia)

Cutting back on the guest musicians of her previous effort and paring down to a basic small group of musicians helps add immediacy to Night Ride Home. While this release features several of Joni Mitchell’s favorites, nothing here would become a hit, as Joni tended to buck trends and follow her own beat. Very involved and a rather tough listen, but well worth the attention, this would be her last for Geffen, where she languished unnoticed while the label went heavy metal crazy. (by James Chrispell)

Joni Mitchell01

Personnel:
Alex Acuña – percussion on 01., 02., 05. 06 – 08.)
David Baerwald (background vocals on 07.)
Vinnie Colaiuta (drums on 03. – 06.+ 10.)
Bill Dillon -(guitar on 02. + 07,  pedal steel guitar on 01,)
Larry Klein (bass, percussion on 01 – 03., 05. – 06., keyboards on 07., guitar on 06.)
Michael Landau (guitar on 10.)
Joni Mitchell (vocals, guitar, keyboards, percussion, billatron on 06.,  oboe on 08., omnichord on 08.)
Karen Peris (background vocals on 03.)
Brenda Russell (background vocals on 09.)
Wayne Shorter (saxophone on 03. + 09.)

MC

Tracklist:
01. Night Ride Home (Mitchell) 3.22
02. Passion Play (When All The Slaves Are Free) (Mitchell) 5.25
03. Cherokee Louise (Mitchell) 4.32
04. The Windfall (Everything for Nothing) (Mitchell) 4.16
05. Slouching Towards Bethlehem (Mitchell/Yeats) 6.55
06. Come In from The Cold (Mitchell) 7.31
07. Nothing Can Be Done (Mitchell/Klein)  4.55
08. The Only Joy In Town (Mitchell) 5.12
09. Ray’s Dad’s Cadillac (Mitchell)  4.34
10. Two Grey Rooms (Mitchell) 3.59

 

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