Melanie – Arabesque (1982)

FrontCover1A very pleasant guitar driven album. “Detroit or Buffalo” sounds as beautiful with her as it does with writer Barbara Keith. There’s an odd reggae number in “When you’re dead and gone”. I hate reggae but I love Melanie, so, after ten spins, let’s say I accepted the song. Country music is represented by “It don’t matter now”. Chip Taylor (yes, he of “Angel of the morning” – made famous by Merrillee Rush – and “Wild thing” – eternized by The Troggs and Jimi Hendrix) nods his way in with “Any way that you want me”. “Roadburn” is rock; “Fooling yourself” is pop with a nice gospel-like choir. “Chances” closes the album in chord progression grandeur. It was 1982 and Melanie made a varied, but synergic album. Lovely. (by S. V. Gomeson)

“Arabesque” (1982) is, hands-down, one of Melanie’s best albums. That she could consistently put out such great, commercial product and get overlooked is one of the saddest unsolved mysteries of modern music. When it was originally released in the U.S, it was on a small, independent label called Blanche Records. In the U.K. and Europe it was on RCA Records. Great combination of original songs mixed with excellent cover material. Fine musicianship and, of course, Melanie’s wonderful vocals in an understated production (by Charles)

Alternate frontcover:

AlternateFrontCover

Personnel:
Melanie Safka (voclas, guitar)
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a bunch of unknown studio musisicians

BackCover

Tracklist:
01. Detroit Or BuffaloA1 Detroit Or Buffalo (Keith) 3.48
02. It Don’t Matter Now (McDonald) 3.12
03. Any Way That You Want Me (Taylor) 4.32
04 .Roadburn (Safka) 3.15
05 .Fooling Yourself (DeVitto) 3.46
06. Too Late (Safka) 4.21
07. Standing On The Other Side (Of Your Love) (Safka) 4.13
08. Love You To Loath Me (Safka) 3.20
09. When You’re Dead And Gone (Safka) 3.05
10. Imaginary Heroes (Evans) 4.36
11. Chances (Russell) 3.33

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The singles from this album:

Singles

Paul Simon – Paul Simon’s Concert In The Park (1991)

FrontCover1Paul Simon’s Concert in the Park is a live album released in 1991 by Paul Simon. It provided a survey of his two most recent albums, Graceland and Rhythm of the Saints, and also drew liberally from his earlier songbook including a number of tunes from the Simon and Garfunkel era. 600,000 people were initially claimed to have attended the show, which was held in Central Park, New York City on August 15, 1991.[1] The concert was similar to The Concert in Central Park, a reunion concert for Simon and Garfunkel held ten years earlier. The album was released on the 50th birthday of Art Garfunkel. (by wikipedia)

Ten years after playing a free concert in New York’s Central Park with Art Garfunkel, Paul Simon returned, backed by the New York session musicians and the native musicians from South Africa and Brazil who had enlivened his solo work. The show was PaulSimon01filmed and recorded, and the audio release was a 23-track double-disc set running nearly two hours. Half the selections came from his Graceland and The Rhythm of the Saints albums, but unlike the Graceland Tour of 1987, the Born at the Right Time Tour of 1991 made room for Simon’s earlier solo work as well as a few Simon & Garfunkel songs. Simon made such stylistically various material work together by front-loading the set with the newer stuff and rearranging some of the older solo stuff, so that “Kodachrome,” for example, was refitted with a guitar line courtesy of Graceland player Ray Phiri. (Wisely, except for a becalmed Africanization of “Cecilia,” Simon didn’t monkey with the S&G songs, most of which came at the end of the set.) But Simon also toned down the Brazilian percussion that had dominated the Saints material and sang it more convincingly, so that “Born at the Right Time,” for example, was far more effective than it had been in its studio version. On the whole, then, Concert in the Park managed to be an enjoyable and surprisingly cohesive career summary. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Mingo Araujo (percussion)
Cyro Baptista (percussion)
Chris Botti (trumpet)
Michael Brecker (saxophone)
Tony Cedras (piano, keyboards, accordion)
Dom Chacal (Percussion)
Steve Gadd (drums)
Sidinho Moreira (percussion)
Vincent Nguini (guitar)
Ray Phiri (guitar)
Barney Rachabane (saxophone, pennywhistle)
Armand Sabal-Lecco (bass)
John Selolwane (guitar)
Paul Simon (vocals, guitar)
Richard Tee (piano)
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background vocals:
The Waters:
Oren Waters – Maxime Waters – Julia Waters

Special guests: Briz, Grupo Cultural OLODUM and Chevy Chase join Paul, dancing to “You Can Call Me Al”.

Booklet03A

Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. The Obvious Child 4.39
02. The Boy in the Bubble 4.49
03. She Moves On 6.26
04. Kodachrome 4.13
05. Born At The Right Time 5.12
06. Train In The Distance 4.45
07. Me And Julio Down By The Schoolyard 3.14
08- I Know What I Know 3.14
09. The Cool, Cool River 5.41
10. Bridge over Troubled Water 5.16
11. Proof 5.39

CD 2:
01. The Coast 7.06
02. Graceland 5.31
03. You Can Call Me Al 5.10
04. Still Crazy After All These Years 3.42
05. Loves Me Like A Rock 2.54
06. Diamonds On The Soles Of Her Shoes 9.30
07. Hearts And Bones 6.17
08. Late In The Evening 4.45
09. America 3.23
10. The Boxer 4.18
11. Cecilia 3.24
12. The Sound Of Silence 5.45

All Songs written by Paul Simon

CD2A
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The Waters

 

Joni Mitchell – Night Ride Home (1991)

FrontCover1Night Ride Home is the fourteenth album by Canadian singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell, released in 1991. It was the last of four albums she recorded for Geffen Records.

Songs on the album include “Cherokee Louise” about a childhood friend who suffered sexual abuse, “The Windfall (Everything For Nothing)” about a maid who tried to sue Mitchell, and the retrospective single release “Come in from the Cold” about childhood and middle age. The title song “Night Ride Home” (originally titled “Fourth of July” and first performed during promotion for her previous album in 1988) was inspired by a moonlit night in Hawaii.  Though the album contained no charting singles, the track “Come in From the Cold” received airplay on AOR stations.

This was Mitchell’s first album not to be distributed by the WEA family of labels. She had been signed to WEA’s Asylum and Reprise labels in the past, and Warner Bros. Records had been the distributor for Geffen Records from 1980 to 1990. That year, Geffen was sold to MCA Music (now Universal Music Group), as a result, the album was distributed by Uni Distribution Corp. (the distribution arm of MCA Music), which also took over the rest of the Geffen catalogue.

A home video release, Come In From The Cold, was released the same year and features promo videos for five tracks from the album along with an interview with Mitchell discussing the inspiration behind them.

As of December 2007, the album has sold 238,000 copies in the US to date. (by wikipedia)

Cutting back on the guest musicians of her previous effort and paring down to a basic small group of musicians helps add immediacy to Night Ride Home. While this release features several of Joni Mitchell’s favorites, nothing here would become a hit, as Joni tended to buck trends and follow her own beat. Very involved and a rather tough listen, but well worth the attention, this would be her last for Geffen, where she languished unnoticed while the label went heavy metal crazy. (by James Chrispell)

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Personnel:
Alex Acuña – percussion on 01., 02., 05. 06 – 08.)
David Baerwald (background vocals on 07.)
Vinnie Colaiuta (drums on 03. – 06.+ 10.)
Bill Dillon -(guitar on 02. + 07,  pedal steel guitar on 01,)
Larry Klein (bass, percussion on 01 – 03., 05. – 06., keyboards on 07., guitar on 06.)
Michael Landau (guitar on 10.)
Joni Mitchell (vocals, guitar, keyboards, percussion, billatron on 06.,  oboe on 08., omnichord on 08.)
Karen Peris (background vocals on 03.)
Brenda Russell (background vocals on 09.)
Wayne Shorter (saxophone on 03. + 09.)

MC

Tracklist:
01. Night Ride Home (Mitchell) 3.22
02. Passion Play (When All The Slaves Are Free) (Mitchell) 5.25
03. Cherokee Louise (Mitchell) 4.32
04. The Windfall (Everything for Nothing) (Mitchell) 4.16
05. Slouching Towards Bethlehem (Mitchell/Yeats) 6.55
06. Come In from The Cold (Mitchell) 7.31
07. Nothing Can Be Done (Mitchell/Klein)  4.55
08. The Only Joy In Town (Mitchell) 5.12
09. Ray’s Dad’s Cadillac (Mitchell)  4.34
10. Two Grey Rooms (Mitchell) 3.59

 

CD

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Spriguns – Time Will Pass (1977)

FrontCover1Spriguns was a folk rock group that participated in the tail end of the limited popularity of English electric folk. Fairport and Steeleye Span had cornered the market, and the genre wasn’t doing all that well as a whole (more’s the pity). Nonetheless, Spriguns managed to make a couple of very nice records for Decca in the mid to late seventies. The band was lead by vocalist Mandy Morton, who possessed some pretty, Sandy Denny-esque dulcet tones.

This is their second record after dropping the “of Tolgus” from their name. Earlier the band had concentrated on traditional material mainly, but this album finds Morton stretching out as a songwriter. All of the tunes have traditional-style melodies, but the lyrics are usually more sparse. Morton had a penchant for dark tales of witchcraft and war, with the occasional love song thrown in. The band’s sound was quite close to that of “All Around My Hat” Steeleye Span at the time, with some big guitar riffs creeping in, as well as some ripping electric violin, but with an overall dark, morose feel. Orchestral arrangements on a couple of tunes were provided by Robert Kirby (N. Drake’s arranger). Kirby had joined the Strawbs at this time, and there is a great deal of crossover appeal to Strawbs fans here, since there are also a lot of good atmospheric keyboard (mostly string synth) parts as well.

Despite a bit of saminess in the vocal melodies, I was pleasantly surprised by this record, which I would heartily recommend to fans of Steeleye Span, Strawbs, Renaissance, Illusion and maybe even Gryphon as well. (by Heptade)

Inlet01A

This is Spriguns’ follow-up to Revel Weird and Wild, and it is much more pop-oriented than that 1976 offering. All but one song was composed by lead singer Mandy Morton, and fiddler Tom Ling, who was a full-time member on Revel Weird and Wild, was relegated to guest musician here; so the traditional or folk elements were noticeably reduced. Robert Kirby’s lush orchestration adorns three selections in a manner similar to Sandy Denny’s Like an Old Fashioned Waltz.

Sandy Roberton, who produced Steeleye Span’s early folk albums, opted for a more pop and rock sound, as the implementation of electric keyboards and rock guitar demonstrates. This would be the last album for this band under the name Spriguns, but Morton would resurface in 1979 in another folk-leaning recording, Magic Lady, with her revamped band Mandy Morton and Spriguns. (by Dave Sleger)

This album is a must !!! A forgotten jewel of Britisch folk-rock !!!

Inlet02APersonnel:
Dennis Dunstan (drums, percussion)
Wayne Morrison (guitar, mandolin, vocals)
Mandy Morton (vocals, guitar)
Mike Morton (bass, vocals)
Dick Powell (guitar, keyboards, vocals)
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Lea Nicholson (concertina)
Tom Ling (violin)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Dead Man’s Eyes 3.49
02. All Before 2.47
03. For You 3.39
04. Time Will Pass 2.31
05. White Witch 3.07
06. Blackwaterside 5.16
07. You’re Not There 2.54
08. Devil’s Night 2.55
09. Letter To A Lady 5.12

All Songs written by Mandy Morton

LabelB1
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Paul Brett – Eclipse (1979)

FrontCover14 stars Brett’s RCA followup to “Interlife” was different enough to show that he was not going to sit still, but similar enough to sound like the same guy. He has opted for 10 shorter tracks and vocals appear on the weakest 2. The material is more varied, from disco funk to acoustic folk to calypso to heavy rock to Renaissance music to jazz standards. In general this release seems designed for greater digestibility. But none of that stops “Eclipse” from being another excellent album.

A whole new batch of thoroughly competent backing musicians provide Brett with the support to succeed again. Woodwinds add a new dimension to a few of the tracks, while brass has returned here and there. Old Tom Newman has a major behind the scenes role. The highlights are most of the instrumental cuts and the way they convincingly link together in spite of their disparity of styles. For instance, “Calypso Street” is a very accessible and jaunty number followed by the more serious and jazzy “Silent Runner”. The gorgeous flute and acoustic guitar combination of “This Side of Paradise” leads convincingly into the crunch of “Mentalmusic”, as unlikely as that sounds. The title cut is quite similar to the material on “Interlife” but far more concise, with a superb folk-based main melody expressed in a variety of accents and mingled with potent lead and sax soloing. “Overture to Decadence” is a well chosen follow up that persists with a ole Englishe theme more overtly and is enhanced by Rob Young’s string arrangements. The album closes with an entirely convincing acoustic rendition of the Dave Brubeck classic “Take Five”.

Sadly unappreciated and still without a digital treatment, this album eclipsed most of what came out in 1979 with its spirited best of breed arrangements and top notch musicianship. Highly recommended, although most here should start with “Interlife” (by kenethlevine)
PaulBrett01
Paul Brett about this Album:
“1979 saw the third LP released by RCA Records. Again different to the other two. Instead of long pieces, I opted for shorter ones, but more tracks. Produced by Tom Newman and myself with arrangements by Rob Young. I changed the musicians with one exception, from those that played on Interlife to equally great ones including Tom Nicol (drums), Dave Olney and Dave Williams ( bass gtrs. ), Steve Gregory and  Ray Warleigh ( brass ), Alan Todd ( rythym guitar ) and my old mate Johnnny Joyce (acoustic 12 string guitar ). Rob Young played keyboards & recorder.  The track that got the most airplay was Johnny’s and my version of Dave Brubeck’s classic instrumental Take Five, which we had long played together as part of our acoustic duo act for a long time.  It was recorded and enginnered at T.W.Studios by Alan Winstanley (Stranglers) in Fulham. Cover artwork was by Sandra Goode.”

His acoustic tunes are the hightlights of this album, especially his great acoustic version of “Take Five” !

PaulBrett02

Personnel:
Paul Brett (guitar)
Steve Gregory (bass)(
Chris Mercer (brass on 01.)
Tom Newman (vocals)
Tom Nichol (drums)
Ray Warleigh (brass)
Rob Young (keyboards, synthesizer, flute)
+
Graham Jarvis (drums on 04. + 06.)
Johnny Joyce (guitar on 03. + 10.)
Dave Olney (bass on 01. + 03.)
Dave Williams (bass on 09.)
Alan Todd (guitar on 02., 05, + 10.)
BackCover1
Tracklist:
01. Nineteen Ninety Nine (Brett/Young) 5.15
02. Calypso Street (Brett) 3.25
03. Silent Runner (Brett/Joyce) 3.09
04  This Side Of Heaven (Brett/Young) 2.55
05  Mental Music (Brett) 3.01
06. Eclipse (Brett) 4.02
07. Overture For Decadence (Brett) 3.00
08. Red Alert (Brett) 3.33
09. Chaos (Brett) 3.19
10. Take Five (Desmond) 4.48

More Paul Brett:

MorePaulBrett

Celilo – Bending Mirrors (2009)

FrontCover1It’s possible Celilo were aiming for an anonymous feel to this album – for certainly band name, title and cover art (a shot of bare trees and grey skies, with no photo of the band to be seen) all conspire to give little clue of what awaits inside. If the intention is to persuade you to give it a listen with no preconceptions, let’s hope that strategy works, as this is really something of a hidden gem.

Celilo are from Portland, Oregon. Celilo Falls was the nearby fishing grounds used for generations by Native Americans until flooded by the building of a dam in 1957, and Celilo lament this on the song “Wy-am”. All thirteen songs on the album are written and sung by Sloan Martin. Martin slurs many of his lyrics in a manner reminiscent of Adam Duritz of Counting Crows. And in fact, if you had to describe Celilo’s music to someone who hadn’t heard them before, a slightly lighter, countrified version of that band – think Counting Crows with pedal steel – wouldn’t be a bad approximation.

Throughout, the lyrics are poetic and evocative, but invariably indirect. Even with the help of the lyric sheet, you’ll be hard pushed to pin down exactly what some of these songs are about. Certainly they are songs that don’t yield up their meaning on first listen. So, depending on your point of view, you’ll either dismiss them as obscure or look forward to repeated listens to try to tease out further meaning.

But the songs aren’t lyric-heavy or ponderous, thanks to Martin’s gift for melody and the uniformly excellent playing of the band. “Bush Pilot” in many ways encapsulates what the band is all about. The lyrics have a poetic feel, if a little oblique, but by the time they get to the chorus, the lovely melody and swirling pedal steel will undoubtedly capture you. The next track “Piñata” is better still, probably the best on the album. Simple acoustic guitar, just Martin’s voice and a harmony vocal: A busted up piñata lying in the street, Empty of everything that once was sweet, with a delightful melodic hook guaranteed to get stuck in your head. (by backroadsmusic.co.uk)

Cecilo01

The opening song on “Bending Mirrors”, Easter Lily could quite easily have been included in the organised chaos that was Journey Through the Past, Neil Young’s ambitious early 1970s film soundtrack. Initially it has the same sort of jamming immediacy, then settles into a perfectly likeable rock driven anthem with a slight nod towards Dark Side era Pink Floyd. Portland’s Celilo, comprised of Sloan Martin providing lead vocals and rhythm guitar, Damon Dunning and Adam East sharing lead guitar and bass duties, Kipp Crawford on drums, Tucker Jackson with that all important pedal steel and finally David Pulliam on keyboards, together with a handful of guest musicians have come up with a piece of laid back and lyrical Americana that straddles the boundaries between inde rock, psychedelia and country folk.

Cecilo02

At times unavoidably sounding like Neil Young’s kid brothers or occasionally Ryan Adams, Celilo have managed to plough their own furrow, largely due to the writing credentials of former drummer turned frontman Sloan Martin. The themes do vary but the songs are unified by the sensitive arrangements and production prowess of the band and Mike Coykendall (She&Him, Blitzen Trapper and M. Ward) respectively.

If indeed the opening song has the driven rock base of a Young classic, then the bulk of the album settles into almost contemplative ballad mode demonstrating the sensitive side of Martin’s writing such as the achingly confessional love poem Pinata or the soulful Bush Pilot. Martin’s strong point though is in the almost surreal rhetoric he employs in songs such as Little Coquette.

BackCover1
Personnel:
Kipp Crawford (drums)
Damon Dunning (guitar, bass, background vocals)
Adam East (bass, guitar, background vocals, harmonica)
Tucker Jackson (pedal steel-guitar)

Sloan Martin (vocals, guitar)
Dave Pulliam (keyboards)
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Jasmine Ash (synthesizer on 03.)
Mike Coykendall (guitar on 09.)“
Matt Kendall (Banjo on 02.)
Graham Nystrom (piano on piano on 08.)
Andy Parker (percussion on 03.)
Annalissa Tornfelt (fidle, Background vocals)
+
background vocals:
Gaudie Darling – Pia DiSilva

Booklet1
Tracklist:
01  Easter Lily 2.40
02. Wy-Am 4.01
03  Winter Pills 3.43
04  Bush Pilot 3.28
05  Piñata 3.03
06  Cigarette Blues 3.13
07  Donut Queen 3.49
08  Sunken Ships  3.23
09  Sirens Of Metropolis 3.19
10  Pink Sofa 3.26
11  Little Coquette 3.17
12  Clatter Of Hooves  3.43
13  Pleistocene 4.24
All Songs written by Sloan Martin
CD1

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Maplewood – Same (2004)

FrontCover1This is the sought-after debut album by Brooklyn’s Maplewood, originally released in 2004. Rising up on a breeze of three-part harmonies and 12-string acoustic guitars, Maplewood evokes a joyride up the Pacific Coast Highway.

Like the scent of night jasmine in bloom, the Maplewood sound wafts from the canyons to the beaches and out into the desert, an ode to a Californian ideal mapped out by such precursors as America, Bread, The Flying Burrito Brothers, Gene Clark, ’70s-era Beach Boys, late-period Byrds, The Stone Canyon Band, John Phillips, Neil Young, Hearts And Flowers, and even CSNY. For the five dudes who make up Maplewood, lost gems like “Ventura Highway” and “Make It With You” evolved from guilty pleasure to buried treasure: in such castoff anthems of mellowness, Maplewood managed to find improbable inspiration.

Call it canyon rock, call it breeze rock, Maplewood is like a desert sunrise, like a dappled afternoon up in the orange groves, like a moon-lit walk on the beach and a swig of dandelion wine with the one you love the most. (by forcedexposure.com)

Maplewood01

Maplewood is a low-key indie rock supergroup with members of Champale, Koester, Cub Country, and Nada Surf gathered together in the spirit of ’70s canyon rock. Their self-titled debut brings back hazy memories of groups like America, Bread, and CSNY. The kind of groups who always seemed ready to break out their acoustic guitars and serenade the sweet hippie chicks around campfires and in hazy bars with heartfelt lead vocals and harmonies, ringing open-chord strumming, lazy tempos, and occasional pedal steel for added melancholy. There are also echoes of more modern bands like R.E.M. on “Darlene,” Lambchop on “Bright Eyes,” and Teenage Fanclub on the chiming “Morning Star.” The spirit of Matthew Sweet also hovers over the proceedings, as he’s been treading these light rock boards for quite a while. So there you have all the influences and connections, all of which don’t mean much if Maplewood can’t deliver the songs. Luckily, they do. Tunes like “Indian Summer,” “Little Dreamer Girl,” and the quiet epic “Desert Queen” sound like they were taken right off a Time/Life Sounds of the 70’s comp. The rest are solid and memorable too. They escape being mere revivalists by investing their hearts into the material. There is no winking or obvious lifting of melodies. They create the feel of the sensitive California ’70s with an easy, sweet manner and plenty of laid-back soul. Not bad for a bunch of short-haired, East Coast fellas. Line them up next to the lovely Autumn Defense and let the ’70s begin again. (by Tim Sendra)
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“For me, there is something wonderfully familiar about the sound of Maplewood. Ever since McGuinn started combining those basic elements—chiming 12-string, soaring harmonies, laid-back California cool—so many years ago, the genre itself (call it what you will) earned the right to be called timeless.
Maplewood are a much newer band, but their sound rings as true to me now as when I bought my first acoustic guitar back in the late sixties. I speak from experience when I say that a lot of work can go into something sounding so effortless. Maplewood understood this from the start. I have always been a fan… from the opening bars of “Indian Summer”—a song we were destined to cover (& we rarely do covers )—to this latest collection.
I was an early convert and it’s clear I’m not alone. The sound that Maplewood wears with such ease has never felt better….
If you’re not already a fan, this new record will soon convert you.
Enjoy.”
(Gerry Beckley, America)

Booklet02A

When Maplewood released their self-titled debut in 2004, it was as if a strong, hot Santa Ana wind had blown through New York’s indie-rock scene. Here was a New York band that didn’t care to sound like the Ramones or Television or the Velvet Underground, but rather one that cast its eyes westward, toward the golden shores of California and – unusual for any band in the 21st century let alone one from Brooklyn – to the laidback legacies of the Beach Boys, the Byrds, the Flying Burritos, and CSNY.
If fans of the members’ previously well-received bands Nada Surf, Champale, and Koester were a bit thrown off by the breezy turn, it didn’t take long for the harmony-heavy Maplewood sound to catch on, as the group showcased at New York’s CMJ Festival, shared a stage with Liz Phair and Camper Van Beethoven at South By Southwest in Austin, Texas, and was soon finding its way into the pages of Spin, The New Yorker, and the Wall Street Journal. Pop Matters declared Maplewood to be “one toke away from the cosmos and harbingers of a movement already afoot. [Their music] makes you want to hit the highway and fly on the ground past the outer limits“. Paste found their first album, which featured guest appearances from members of the Hold Steady and Sparklehorse, to have “a gorgeous, pot-smoking melancholy that perfectly recaptures the easy, breezy sound of vintage FM radio.“ And Newsday proclaimed Maplewood one of New York’s top ten rock bands. (by tapetenrecords)

Maplewood03

Personnel:
Ira Elliot (drums, Percussion, vocals)
Steve Koester (vocals, guitar, keyboards)
Mark Rozzo (vocals, guitar, keyboards)
Craig Schoen (vocals, bass, guitar)
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Elaine Ahn (cello)
Judd Counsell (drums, percussion)
Kate Hohman (violin)
Joe McGinty (piano)
Geoff Sanoff (chamberlin)
Alan Weatherhead (pedal steel-guitar, wurlitzer)
Jude Webre (bass, wurlitzer)

Booklet01A

Tracklist:
01. Indian Summer (Rozzo) 3.16
02. Darlene (Schoen) 2.32
03. Gemini On The Way (Koester/Rozzo) 3.41
04. Little Dreamer Girl (Koester) 3.38
05. Santa Fe (Koester) 3.14
06. Be My Friend (Rozzo) 2.10
07. Bright Eyes (Koester) 3.23
08. Morning Star (Rozzo) 2.44
09. Sea Hero (Koester) 323
10. Think It Through (Rozzo) 3.12
11. Poconos (Schoen) 2.39
12. Carolina Jasmine (Koester) 4.00
13. Desert Queen (Rozzo) 5.37

CD1

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