Randy Holland – Cat Mind (1972)

FrontCover1.jpgRandy Holland (1943-2011) was born in Boulder, Colorado and was raised in Kansas City, Missouri, and Westfield, New Jersey. Randy was an art and music advocate his whole life. His album “Cat Mind” was a four star pick in Billboard in 1972. This is a very nice rock release, with some folk and country inflections, and a good loner vibe. It’s not (contrary to some catalogues) psychedelic, but Hollands’ dark and somewhat snotty delivery and some smokin’ guitar make it stand out from the pack. (by discogs.com)

There are many different kinds of records. Some latch onto you almost immediately and either stand the test of time or else slip away as easily as they came. Randy Holland’s 1972 album Cat Mind is the other kind; those unusual and sometimes uneven records that take more than one listen to fully appreciate. Released on the independent Mother Records label, it can probably be said that Cat Mind never had a chance at real commercial success. But hell, we’re not interested in the commercial success here – we’re after good records, wherever they ended up and in whatever condition. And Cat Mind is a good record.

Looking at that stark, black and white cover shot you’re probably expecting a good deal of grit here, and the opening cut doesn’t disappoint in that department. The off-kilter flower child stomp of “Bless the Naked Days” also wastes no time introducing the listener to Holland’s rough and nasally voice; a voice which he tends to push to the limits, and often far beyond. Depending on where you’re coming from, I reckon this could either be an acquired taste or a real attraction.

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Following this first number, “Colors of Sad” is bizarrely saccharine, and it’s this vivid contrast between wildness and melancholy which perhaps defines this record more than anything else. Holland tilts mercilessly between incisive, jagged rock and roll numbers and melodramatic country cuts, with very little sense of transition or artistic compromise. His uncredited backup band really shines, especially on the former, where they lay down some of the most righteous country-stained rock this side of
Wray’s Shack Three Track. The hot swamp growl of “Muddy Water” is a real highlight, as is the weird title track, graced with scorching Davie Allan-style guitar work and an insistent rhythm section. Holland’s forays into the tamer side of Americana are more hit-and-miss, giving us both the warm and gentle “Ladybug” and an unfortunately overwrought reading of Mickey Newbury’s “Remember the Good”.

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Fortunately, however, even the most underwhelming cuts are outweighed by the grittier numbers, and the overall quality and unique character of Cat Mind really does warrant it the kind of reissue treatment afforded so many other lost jewels of the period, such as Vernon Wray’s Wasted. As it stands, it isn’t all that hard to track down a used copy for a decent price. And what ever happened to Randy Holland?

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From what it looks like, he retired his attempts at making it in the music scene not long after cutting this record and moved to Las Vegas, where he opened an art gallery and devoted the rest of his days to painting and poetry. He passed away a few years ago, truly making this his one and only album. (by therisingstorm.net)

All articles in this entry are from the Billboard Magazine, 1972 and I would like to dedicate this entry to all these beautiful loosers in the history of Rock music.

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Personnel:
Randy Holland (guitar, vocals)
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a bunch of unknown sudio musicians

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Tracklist:
01. Bless The Naked Days (Holland) 3.05
02.  Colours Of Sad (Holland) 4.49
03. Song For A Rainy Tuesday (Alpaugh) 3.03
04. Make Me Flowers (Holland/Bishop) 2.43
05. Muddy Water (Wright) 3.16
06. I’ll Remember The Good (Newberry) 3.01
07. Cat Mind (Holland) 2.56
08. Indian Blues (Holland) 3.19
09. Ladybug (Alpaugh) 2.34
10. Take My Hand (Holland) 3.39

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Randy Holland passed away Jan. 7, 2011. He was born in Boulder, Colo., in 1943, was raised in Kansas, Mo., and Westfield, N.J. He attended the University of Denver where he majored in philosophy. His mother, Cobbie Holland, was an excellent amateur artist who won many awards in New Jersey and regional competitions. Randy was an art and music advocate his whole life. His album “Cat Mind” was a four star pick in Billboard in 1972. While his business life turned to the Casinos of Las Vegas in 1977, where he remained until 1995, his artistic life in music and art remained active. He owned and operated the Randy Holland1Temecula Art Gallery in Temecula, Calif., from 1995-1999. During the course of three short years, the Gallery provided the community with top notch art shows, a wide variety of performing art, as well as support for the many assistance organizations in the valley. He was past-president of the Arts Council of Temecula Valley; on the board of The American Cancer Society, and Dorland Mountain Arts Colony. He was appointed by the City of Temecula to the Old Town Redevelopment Advisory Committee, and was a 1997 Temecula “Good Neighbor.” Randy is survived by his brother, Dutch Holland; his daughter, Robbie Hansen, her husband Joel, and grandsons, Dylan and Tristan all of Las Vegas. He also has two sons, Mark in Reno, and Shawn in Phoenix, with two more grandchildren Madison and Sawyer. (obits.reviewjournal.com)

Bob Dylan – In The Summertime – Live In Drammen, Norway (1981)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Bob Dylan World Tour 1981 was a concert tour by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. The tour lasted from June 10, 1981 to November 21, 1981 and consisted of 54 concerts in three legs: 31 in North America and 23 in Europe. The tour promoted the release of Dylan’s 1981 album Shot of Love.

The tour started on June 10, 1981 in Chicago, Illinois. Dylan performed a further three concerts in the United States before travelling to Europe.[5] The European leg of the tour started on June 21 in Toulouse in France and consisted of twenty three concerts, the largest number of concerts taking place in England where eight shows were performed. All shows from July 1 onwards were recorded by members of Dylan’s crew.

Tourposter1981.jpgThe European tour ended in tragedy in Avignon, France where a member of the crowd fell into the electric cables before the first song and caused total power loss. Dylan and the band improvised an unplugged instrumental until the power was restored and ‘Saved’ was started from the beginning. In the accident two people were killed, but the show went ahead despite the incident.

Dylan returned to the United States in October to perform twenty three concerts there. Dylan also performed four concerts in Canada. The tour came to an end in Lakeland, Florida on November 21 after fifty-four concerts. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a pretty good soundboard recording from his concert at the at the Drammenshallen, Drammen, Norway; July 10, 1981 (Concert # 13 of The Europe Summer Tour 1981. 1981 concert #17.)

This 2 CD package is an absolute ‘must have’ for fans of the gospel period. Both shows are smooth, full, warm, and well mixed in a fantastic quality; right from the soundboard.

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Personnel:
Tim Drummond (bass)
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Steve Ripley (guitar)
Willie Smith (keyboards)
Fred Tackett (guitar)
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background vocals:
Clydie King – Carolyn Dennis – Regina McCrary – Madelyn Quebec

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Tracklist:
01. The Times They Are A-Changin’ 5.11
02. Gotta Serve Somebody 4.12
03. I Believe In You 5.04
04. Like A Rolling Stone 6.44
05. Till I Get It Right  3.46
06. Man Gave Names To All The Animals 4.54
07. Maggie’s Farm 1.09
08. Girl From The North Country 5.50
09. Ballad Of A Thin Man 3.28
10. In The Summertime 3.41
11. Slow Train 5.37
12. Let’s Begin  3.38
13. Lenny Bruce 4.38
14. Mr. Tambourine Man 5.44
15. Just Like A Woman 4.22
16. Forever Young 4.37
17. Jesus Is The One 3.55
18. Heart Of Mine 5.11
19. When You Gonna Wake Up 5.31
20. In The Garden (with band introduction) 9.29
21. Blowin’ In The Wind 5.55
22. It Ain’t Me, Babe 5.59
23. Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door 5.44

All songs written by Bob Dylan
except “Till I Get It Right” which was written by Red Lane & Larry Henley and Let’s Begin, which was written by  Jim Webb

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Paul Brett – Guitar Trek (1980)

FrontCover1.JPGPaul Brett is one of my favorties acoustic guitar player from UK.

The final album of guitar virtuoso Paul Brett´s disk contract with RCA, “Guitar Trek” is by far the most obscure. It was met with a dearth of promotional effort, but it’s hard to know whether this was because Brett had already signed on to produce a K-Tel record, its predecessors were fracturing the cutout bins or their day, or it’s the least inspired of the three.

Nothing is missing from Brett’s technique, which is more focused on acoustic guitar in a rock setting, but most tracks do seem almost like placeholders for exhibits of the man’s awesome fretting power. His ability is such that he can overpower pieces that other guitarists might complement better. Here and there we find snippets of what was generally better developed on prior albums; for instance, “In Search of Aztecs” hearkens back to the suite “Interlife” while failing to capture the ensemble effect that really propelled the flow of those choice 16 minutes. “Alternative 12-string” at times approximates works like “Calypso” and “Silent Runner” off “Eclipse” but tries out too many concepts for its own good in under 6 minutes. Gershwin’s “Summertime” does not revive the magic of Brett’s prior adaptation of Brubeck’s “Take Five”, but perhaps it is just not as fresh or appealing a number to begin with.

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The three tracks that work the best do so for different reasons – “Forever Autumn” succeeds as much because the Jeff Wayne composition is so brilliant as anything, but one must give substantial credit to Brett for treating it sensitively and imbuing it with his own identity, while leaving its spirit intact. “Even when the sun shines” expands upon the courtly folk of “Overture for Decadence” off “Eclipse”, but incorporates more rock aspects, consistent with the album as a whole. Finally, the closer “Blood on the Frets” actually parlays the guitarist’s prowess into the realm of country, bluegrass and rock and roll all at once, succeeding brilliantly. (by Keneth Levine)

For me, it´s another brilliant Paul Brett album …

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Personnel:
Paul Brett (guitar)
Richard Harvey (keyboards, recorder)
John Joyce (guitar)
Tom Nichol (drums)
Paul Townshend (bass)
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Alan Todd (guitar on 02.)

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Tracklist:
01. Alternative 12 String (Brett) 5.48
02. Forever Autumn (Wayne/Osborne/Vigrass) 3.17
03. Before Tequila (Brett/Joyce) 3.11
04. Summertime (Gershwin) 3.55
05. The Bishop Went Down To Fulham (Brett/Joyce) 3.25
06. In Search Of Aztecs (Brett) 3.51
07. Even When The Sun Shines (Brett) 2.57
08. Jazz For The Late Night Wife Swappers (Brett) 3.25
09. Handbuilt By Robots (Brett/Joyce) 4.04
10. Blood On The Fretts (Brett) 2.40

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More from Paul Brett, a real master of the acoustic guitar:

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Quiver – Same (1971)

FrontCover1.jpgQuiver was a melodic UK progressive rock band, Quiver occasionally followed a country rock path but achieved more success following their merger with the Sutherland Brothers. The line-up comprised Tim Renwick (b. 7 August 1949, Cambridge, England; guitar, vocals, flute) and Cal Batchelor (guitar, vocals, keyboards). Renwick had formerly been with Junior’s Eyes, and he and Batchelor recruited Cochise drummer John ‘Willie’ Wilson (b. 8 July 1947, Cambridge, England). Subsequently, the line-up of Wilson, Renwick, Batchelor, and ex-Village bass player Bruce Thomas (b. 14 August 1948, Middlesbrough, Cleveland, England; bass/vocals), recorded the self-produced Quiver. For the recording, they were augmented by Dick Parry (saxophone). The same line-up recorded Gone In The Morning, but due to lack of commercial success the band was subsequently dropped by Warner Brothers Records. The members were not coming up with new songs, and so they decided to join the Sutherland Brothers, the two line-ups merging in late 1972 with the addition of Pete Wood (b. Middlesex, England, d. 1994, New York, USA; keyboards).

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Shortly afterwards they were signed to Island Records, and with a number of personnel changes, achieved a degree of chart success. Renwick went on to form 747 and Kicks and is now an in-demand session guitar player, touring with bands such as Pink Floyd and Mike And The Mechanics. Wilson plays with the Coyotes, and Thomas with Elvis Costello’s backing band the Attractions. Quiver’s greatest claim, however, is being the first ever band to play the legendary Rainbow Theatre in London. (by allmusic)
I give this release 4 stars because the playing is just so good.Where it falls down slightly is due to the lack of really memorable tunes.When they palled up with Iain and Gavin Sutherland the Sutherlands got a red hot band to replace the workmanlike but dull band on their debut album and Quiver got some tunes and what tunes they were.Tim Renwick is one of my favourite guitar slingers,his work on Al Stewarts “Modern Times” album is ace. (woody123)

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One of my all-time favorite albums but I can see that is not the case with most reviewers. It’s kinda mellow country rock with a couple toe tappers. The guitar player is masterful and the bass player is excellent.

I guess it takes a few listens and some mental adjustments but I think this is an outstanding recording. It just pushes all the right buttons for me and I seem to be alone in that regard.

Killer Man is a killer track and Tim Renwick is a killer guitarist. From the best year for music ever … 1971. (rod45)

Surprising progressive folk band. Its progressiveness derives of the fact that Quiver plays a folk rock in a low pace with elaborated arrangements and excellent execution of instruments. An special comment deserve the bass player (Bruce Thomas). Voices are relaxed and the band do harmonies, according to the general ambient: relaxed and beautifully executed.
Some songs are normal folk songs, But some songs like “Cool Evening” are extra reflective songs including flutes to create the ambience.
t’s hard to understand why the low rate as this band deserve more. IMHO people who likes folk with an special touch can’t miss this first attempt of Quiver band. (DaremoS)

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Personnel:
Cal Batchelor (guitar, keyboards, vocals)
Tim Renwick (guitar, flute, vocals)
Bruce Thomas (bass, vocals)
Willie Wilson (drums, percussion, vocals)
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Dick Parry (saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. Glad I Came Around (Batchelor) 5.05
02. Down Your Way (Batchelor) 3.47
03. Killer Man (Renwick) 7.54
04. Take A Train (Batchelor) 5.08
05. Cool Evening (Batchelor) 4.16
06. Barnes County (Renwick/Batchelor/Thomas/Wilson) 4.27
07. Back On The Road (Thomas) 3.28
08. Just Loving You (Batchelor) 2.00
09. Reason For Staying (Batchelor/Renwick) 7.02

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Cal Batchelor.jpgCal Batchelor has been a long time fixture in the music scene both here (Canada) and in the UK.
Born Calvin Batchelor, he was a fantastic Canadian guitarist (also a skilled keyboardist).
Cal went to England in 1969, and he helped form Quiver. They were the first group to play at Rainbow Theatre in London (supporting The Who). After leaving Quiver, Cal formed a band called 747. He then joined Long John Baldry for a while (as supporters for Faces). There, he met Ronnie Lane, joining his band later.
In February 1977, Cal formed another notable band called Kicks. In the 80s, Cal returned to Canada. He fronted his own Cal Batchelor Band for a number of years in Vancouver.

Cal’s beloved wife Yvonne passed away in recent weeks from cancer, and Cal certainly missed her in his life. Cal passed away on Sunday December 20, 2015. (rcmusicproject.com)

Levon Helm – Levon Helm & The RCO All-Stars (1977)

FrontCover1.JPGLevon Helm and the RCO All-Stars is a 1977 album by the short-lived musical group of the same name. It was Levon Helm’s first studio album independent of the Band

Levon Helm was an American singer, musician and actor, best known for his role as drummer for The Band.

Levon Helm was born in rural Arkansas in 1940, and grew up surrounded by blues, country and R&B music. He made the decision to become a musician after seeing bluegrass pioneer Bill Monrow perform, and subsequently took up both guitar and drums – he was playing in local bars and clubs by the time he was 17 years old. After graduating high school he became the drummer for The Hawks, the backing group of rockabilly artist Ronnie Hawkins. With Hawkins he made the move to Toronto, Canada, where southern rockabilly acts were very popular at the time. He stayed with Hawkins for many years, as his mentor recruited a number of young Canadian musicians into the band, which eventually led to the line-up of Helm, guitarist Robbie Robertson, bassist Rick Danko, pianist Richard Manuel and organist Garth Hudson.
In 1963 the group parted ways with Hawkins, and toured across both the USA and Canada. In 1965 they became the unlikely backing band of Bob Dylan following his move into electric rock music, and they embarked on a world tour with him. However before long Helm had left, disheartened by the negative reaction Dylan’s new music was getting. He returned to Arkansas for a couple of years, but eventually reunited with his bandmates in Woodstock in 1967, where they began to hone a unique new fusion of American roots music styles. Reinvented as The Band, they were signed to Capitol Records, and their debut album Music From Big Pink was a huge hit with the critics. The Band released seven studio albums between 1968 and 1977, with Helm’s distinctive southern vocals a vital ingredient in their sound. Though Danko and Manuel were gifted vocalists as well, Helm got to sing lead on their best-known songs – “The Weight”, “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” and “Up On Cripple Creek”. His unique drumming style was another key ingredient, and it earned him much praise. He also contributed mandolin and guitar.

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The Band broke up in 1976, and Helm started work on a solo album. It saw release the next year as Levon Helm & The RCO All-Stars, and featured appearances from Paul Butterfield, Dr John, Booker T & The MGs and Fred Carter Jr. Robertson and Hudson also guested on one song. It was certainly nothing ground-breaking or a new, but it was a good album, in a bluesy roots-rock style with definite echoes of The Band (indeed the one song to feature both Robertson and Hudson practically was The Band). The songs were mostly covers, and included numbers by Dr John, Earl King and Chuck Berry.

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Ex-Band drummer/vocalist Levon Helm could not have surrounded himself with a more talented group of musicians for his first solo outing — Booker T. and the MGs and Dr. John anchor the RCO All-Stars. But while there is no question that the band can really cook, Levon’s homey Arkansas twang gets a little lost in the mix. In general, though, the songs are buoyed by Paul Butterfield’s blues harp and the crack horn section, especially on the soulful “Rain Down Tears.” (by by J.P. Ollio)

What a line-up !

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Personnel:
Paul Butterfield (harmonica, background vocals)
Fred Carter, Jr. (guitar)
Steve Cropper (guitar)
Donald Dunn (bass)
Levon Helm (vocals, drums)
Howard Johnson (saxophone, tuba)
Booker T. Jones (keyboards, percussion)
Tom Malone (trombone)
Lou Marini (saxophone)
Mac “Dr. John” Rebennack (keyboards, background vocals, guitar, percussion)
Alan Rubin (trumpet)
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background vocals:
Jeannette Baker – John Flamingo – Emmaretta Marks
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additional musicians on 05.:
Jesse Ehrlich (strings)
Garth Hudson (accordion)
Louis Kievman (strings)
William Kurasch (strings)
Charles Miller (saxophone)
Robbie Robertson (guitar)
Sid Sharp (strings)

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Tracklist:
01. Washer Woman (Rebennack) 3.15
02. The Tie That Binds (Rebennack/Guidry) 4.35
03. You Got Me (Jones) 4.16
04. Blues So Bad (Glover/Helm) 4.16
05. Sing, Sing, Sing (Let’s Make A Better World) (King) 3.51
06. Milk Cow Boogie (Arnold/Traditional) 3.11
07. Rain Down Tears (Glover/Toombs) 5.21
08. A Mood I Was In (Carter) 3.42
09. Havana Moon (Berry) 4.28
10. That’s My Home (Traditional) 3.23

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Levon Helm

Mark Lavon “Levon” Helm (May 26, 1940 – April 19, 2012)

Jethro Tull – Heavy Horses (1978)

FrontCover1.jpgHeavy Horses is the eleventh studio album by British progressive rock band Jethro Tull, released on 10 April 1978. It is considered the second album in a trilogy of folk-rock albums by Jethro Tull, although folk music’s influence is evident on a great number of Jethro Tull releases. The album abandons much of the folk lyrical content typical of the previous studio album, Songs from the Wood (1977), in exchange for a more realist perspective on the changing world – the album is dedicated to the “indigenous working ponies and horses of Great Britain”. Likewise, the band sound is harder and tighter. The third album in the folk-rock trilogy is Stormwatch (1979).

Produced by Ian Anderson and recorded and engineered by Robin Black in London, Heavy Horses marks the last Jethro Tull studio album with full participation of bass player John Glascock. Anderson stated that the recording of the album came at a time when other artists were moving towards the new trends in music, and the band decided they did not want “to appear as if we were trying to slip into the post-punk coattails that were worn by The Stranglers or The Police […] They were bands that were seen as being part of the punk world, but they weren’t”.

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Heavy Horses bares more earthly and prosaic themes compared to its predecessor. Songs about the conformist view of daily life (“Journeyman”), or dedicated to Anderson’s dog (“Rover”) and cat (“…And the Mouse Police Never Sleeps”), or even another one for his new son, James (“No Lullaby”). However, an element already present in Songs from The Wood, Heavy Horses served as a discourse on transience and disappearing worlds. The title track – one of two complex suites on the record – is compared by Anderson to an “equestrian Aqualung “.

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Other tracks, such as “Acres Wild” and “Weathercock”, works as a plea for better days ahead. But, alongside the changes on themes, the music went much harder, too. The mini-epic of the title track flowing from a piano ballad to a fiddle-fest (of Curved Air’s Darryl Way) to full gallop, is a great example of the album’s style as a whole. “No Lullaby” rushes from a crushing Martin Barre riff as “Weathercock” starts full folk, to add progressive rock flavours. Barre declared that ” Songs From The Wood and Heavy Horses are two of the best albums from my time in Jethro Tull”.

Rolling Stone’s contemporary review was positive, calling the instrumental arrangements lavish and stating that Heavy Horses and the folk genre, as a follow up to Songs From the Wood, suited Jethro Tull perfectly.

The album reached No. 19 on the Billboard 200 album chart, and peaked at No. 20 on the UK Albums Chart.

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Personnel:
Ian Anderson (vocals, flute, guitar, mandolin)
Barriemore Barlow (drums, percussion)
Martin Barre (guitar)
John Evan (keyboards)
John Glascock (bass, background vocals)
Dee Palmer (keyboards, portative pipe organ)
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Darryl Way – violin (on “Acres Wild” and “Heavy Horses”)

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Tracklist:
01. …And the Mouse Police Never Sleeps 3.14
02. Acres Wild 3.25
03. Heavy Horses 8.59
04. Journeyman 3.58
05. Moths 3.27
06. No Lullaby 7.55
07. One Brown Mouse 3.23
08. Rover 4.16
09. Weathercock 4.03

All tracks written by Ian Anderson with additional material by Martin Barre and David Palmer.

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Emmylou Harris – Wrecking Ball (1995)

FrontCover1.jpgWrecking Ball is the eighteenth studio album by American country artist Emmylou Harris, released on September 26, 1995 through Elektra Records. Moving away from her traditional acoustic sound , Harris collaborated with producer Daniel Lanois (best known for his production work with U2) and engineer Mark Howard. The album has been noted for atmospheric feel, and featured guest performances by Steve Earle, Larry Mullen, Jr., Kate & Anna McGarrigle, Lucinda Williams and Neil Young, who wrote the title song.

Though her choice of songs had always been eclectic, the album was regarded as a departure. Harris, the age of 48, had become something of an elder stateswoman in country music. The album received almost universally positive reviews, making many critics’ year-end “best of” lists, and pointed Harris’ career in a somewhat different direction, where she would incorporate a harder edge. As a career-redefining album, Wrecking Ball was compared to Marianne Faithfull’s 1979 Broken English album and Johnny Cash’s American Recordings. Wrecking Ball won the 1996 Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Recording.

Harris covered Neil Young’s song “Wrecking Ball”, and the track includes harmonies by Young. Although the song was released by Harris as a 2-track CD single with Lucinda Williams’ “Sweet Old World”, reviewers did not consider the title track the high point on the album. (by wikipedia)

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Wrecking Ball is a leftfield masterpiece, the most wide-ranging, innovative, and daring record in a career built on such notions. Rich in atmosphere and haunting in its dark complexity, much of the due credit belongs to producer Daniel Lanois; best known for his work with pop superstars like U2 and Peter Gabriel, on Wrecking Ball Lanois taps into the very essence of what makes Harris tick — the gossamer vocals, the flawless phrasing — while also opening up innumerable new avenues for her talents to explore. The songs shimmer and swirl, given life through Lanois’ trademark ringing guitar textures and the almost primal drumming of U2’s Larry Mullen, Jr. The fixed point remains Harris’ voice, which leaps into each and every one of these diverse compositions — culled from the pens of Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Steve Earle, and others — with utter fearlessness, as if this were the album she’d been waiting her entire life to make. Maybe it is. (by Jason Ankeny)

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Personnel:
Malcolm Burn (keyboards, vibraphone, tambourine synthesizer, slid-guitar on 08. + 12., bass on 11., drums on 11., background vocals)
Emmylou Harris (vocals, guitar)
Daniel Lanois (mandolin, guitar, bass on 01. + 03., dulcimer on 10,  vocals on 01. + 09., percussion on 04., bass pedals on 08.)
Larry Mullen, Jr. (drums, percusion)
Tony Hall (bass, percussion, stick drum on 10.)
Daryl Johnson (background vocals, percussion)
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Richard Bennett (guitar on 08.)
Brian Blade (drums on 01, Indian hand drum on 05.)
Steve Earle (guitar on 02., 07. + 08.)
Kufaru Mouton (percussion on 05.)
Sam O’Sullivan (roto wheel on 04.)
Lucinda Williams (guitar on 08.)
Neil Young (harmonica on 08, background vocals on 04. + 08.)
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background vocals on 12.:
Anna McGarrigle – Kate McGarrigle

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Tracklist:
01. Where Will I Be? (Lanois) 4.16
02. Goodbye (Earle) 4.53
03. All My Tears (Miller) 3.42
04. Wrecking Ball (Young) 4.50
05. Goin’ Back To Harlan (A.McGarrigle) 4.51
06. Deeper Well (Olney/Lanois/Harris) 4.19
07. Every Grain Of Sand (Dylan) 3.56
08. Sweet Old World (Williams) 5.06
09. May This Be Love (Hendrix) 4:45
10. Orphan Girl (Welch) 3.15
11. Blackhawk (Lanois) 4.28
12. Waltz Across Texas Tonight (Crowell/Harris) 4.47

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