Paul Brett Sage – Same (1970)

usfrontcover1Paul Brett (born 20 June 1947, Fulham, London) is an English classic rock guitarist. He played lead guitar with Strawbs (though he was never actually a member), The Overlanders, The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, Elmer Gantry’s Velvet Opera, The Velvet Opera, Tintern Abbey, Fire, Roy Harper, Al Stewart, Lonnie Donegan, and switched to twelve-string guitar in the 1970s.

His first twelve-string guitar suite, Earth Birth, was released on his own label, Phoenix Future, and was produced by artist Ralph Steadman of Fear and Loathing fame. Critical acclaim led to Brett being signed on a four-album deal with RCA Records. His K-tel Romantic Guitar album went platinum in the UK, but Brett stopped recording soon afterwards. He started recording again in 2000, with long-time friend and fellow twelve-string guitarist, John Joyce.

Brett wrote for music magazines Melody Maker, Sound International and International Musician and continued working in the music industry in the later part of his career. He now writes a regular column for Acoustic, a magazine specializing in acoustic guitars. He is also the Associate Editor and Features Writer for Music Maker and Live in London magazines.

He has appeared on BBC Television’s Antiques Road Show and Flog It in the mid-2000s. (by wikipedia)

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And this is his wonderful debut album from 1970:

Tying together many of the musical threads of their day, Paul Brett Sage was a progressive band in the best sense of the word, with an adventurous sound that was accessible to all, though they never lost sight of their origins. The group grew out of the folk duo of guitarist/singer Paul Brett and percussionist Bob Voice, and their eponymous debut album sees Paul Brett Sage retain a folksy bend, which reaches grand agit-folk heights on “Trophies of War.” Elsewhere, Brett’s fiery licks and solos, particularly on the anthemic “3D Mona Lisa,” paints rock right across the backwoods vista. Evocative flamenco-tinged guitar sizzles around “The Sun Died,” while Brett’s aggressive performance on both 12-string and electric guitar creates a “Warlock” worthy of the modern age. With the band’s prominent use of percussion, Nicky Higginbottom’s haunting flute, their strong melodies, and infectious choruses, Paul Brett Sage hovers between folk, rock, world, and pop; an album that deftly manages to be all things to all people. (by Dave Thompson)

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Alternate frontcover from Italy

Personnel:
Paul Brett (guitar, vocals)
Dick Dufall (bass)
Nicky Higginbottom (flute, saxophone)
Bob Voice (drums, percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. 3D Mona Lisa (Royce) 3.18
02. The Sun Died (Brett) 4.00
03. Little Aztec Prince (Voice) 4.22
04. Reason For Your Asking (Brett) 4.09
05. Trophies Of War (Brett) 3.43
06. The Tower (Brett) 5.14
07. The Painter (Brett) 4.11
08. Mediterranean Lazy Heat Wave (Voice) 3.16
09. Warlock (Brett) 5.41

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Single sleeves from UK, France, Germany & Australia

More Paul Brett:

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Cat Stevens – Saturnight (Live In Tokyo) (1974)

frontcover1This is probably one of the rarest albums Cat Stevens ever recorded:

When it comes to charity albums from the ’70s, one thinks of The Concert For Bangladesh (1971) and then The Music For UNICEF Concert: A Gift Of Song (1979). But in 1974, Cat Stevens released Saturnight (Live In Tokyo) on vinyl and only in Japan.

In 2009 sherrill50 posted the following note at the Steve Hoffman Forum: “In 1974, Cat Stevens and his band recorded a live show in Tokyo which A&M Records issued the same year on LP as ‘Saturnight’ – but ONLY in Japan. Sort of the holy grail for Cat’s fans, this has (as far as I know) never been issued on CD, anywhere. Renny pointed out (as I’d also heard) that Cat Stevens, now Yusuf Islam, had a serious dislike for the performance and, as a result, it would probably never be issued.”

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My love for Cat Stevens isn’t what it used to be but I still enjoy his classic albums Tea for the Tillerman and Teaser and the Firecat once in a while. Most of my favourite songs made it onto this live release in a dignified quality, in contrast to the later Majikat live album which was overstuffed with ladies’ choirs and other grotesqueries. In addition to being a not ungifted acoustic guitarist and pianist, Cat has got a warm, gentle voice that somehow reminds me of oak wood. His songs are elegant and uncomplicated, and most of you will probably have heard one of them somewhere. The best ones among them are usually a tad autumnal (Wild World, My Lady d’Arbanville) if not plain sad, like Father and Son and Oh Very Young, though sometimes also hopeful like Peace Train. Ah, the nostalgia. (by for-the-greater-good.blogspot.de)

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Alternate frontcovers

Personnel:
Gerry Conway (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Jim Cregan (guitar)
Alun Davies (guitar, background vocals)
Bruce Lynch (bass)
Suzanne Lynch (background vocals)
Anna Peacock (background vocals)
Jean Roussel (keyboards)
Larry Steele (guitar, percussion, background vocals)
Cat Stevens (vocals, guitar, synthesizer, percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. Wild World (Stevens) 3.03
02. Oh Very Young ((Stevens) 2.28
03. Sitting (Stevens) 3:14
04. Where Do the Children Play (Stevens) 3:52
05. Lady d’Arbanville (Stevens) 3:47
06. Another Saturday Night (Cooke) 2.35
07. Hard Headed Woman (Stevens) 3:54
08. Peace Train (Stevens) 3:58
09. Father And Son (Stevens) 3:41
10. King Of Trees (Stevens) 3:28
11. Bad Penny (Stevens) 3:21
12. Bitterblue (Stevens) 3:12.

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The Band – Music From The Big Pink (1968)

frontcover1Music from Big Pink is the debut studio album by the Band. Released in 1968, it employs a distinctive blend of country, rock, folk, classical, R&B, and soul. The music was composed partly in “Big Pink”, a house shared by Rick Danko, Richard Manuel and Garth Hudson in West Saugerties, New York. The album itself was recorded in studios in New York and Los Angeles in 1968,[6] and followed the band’s backing of Bob Dylan on his 1966 tour (as the Hawks) and time spent together in upstate New York recording material that was officially released in 1975 as The Basement Tapes, also with Dylan. The cover artwork is a painting by Dylan.

The Band began to create their distinctive sound during 1967, when they improvised and recorded with Bob Dylan a huge number of cover songs and original Dylan material in the basement of a pink house in West Saugerties, New York, located at 56 Parnassus Lane (formerly 2188 Stoll Road). The house was built by Ottmar Gramms, who bought the land in 1952. The house was newly built when Rick Danko found it as a rental. Danko moved in along with Garth Hudson and Richard Manuel in February 1967. The house became known locally as “Big Pink’ for its pink siding. The house was subsequently sold by Gramms in 1977, and since 1998, it has been a private residence.

Though widely bootlegged at the time, the recordings Dylan and the Band made were first officially released in 1975 on The Basement Tapes, and then released in their totality in 2014 on The Basement Tapes Complete. By the end of 1967 The Band felt it was time to step out of Dylan’s shadow and make their own statement.

The Band’s manager Albert Grossman (who was also Dylan ‘s manager) approached Capitol Records to secure a record deal for a group still informally described as “Dylan’s backing band”. Stanley Gortikov at Capitol signed The Band—initially under the name The Crackers. Armed with news of a recording deal for the group, they lured Levon Helm back from the oil rigs where he had been working, to Woodstock where he took up his crucial position in the Band, singing and playing drums. Helm’s return coincided with a ferment of activity in Big Pink as the embryonic Band not only recorded with Dylan but also began to write their own songs, led by guitarist Robbie Robertson.

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After meeting with producer John Simon, the Band started to record their debut album in Manhattan at A&R Studios, on the 7th floor of 799 7th Avenue at 52nd Street in the early months of 1968. The Band recorded “Tears of Rage”, “Chest Fever”, “We Can Talk”, “This Wheel’s On Fire” and “The Weight” in two sessions. Robertson has said that when Simon asked them how they wanted it to sound, they replied, “Just like it did in the basement.”

Capitol were so pleased with the initial recording session, they suggested the group move to Los Angeles to finish recording their first album at Capitol Studios. They also cut some material at Gold Star Studios on Santa Monica Boulevard. The songs on Big Pink recorded in L.A. were “In A Station”, “To Kingdom Come”, “Lonesome Suzie”, “Long Black Veil” and “I Shall Be Released”.

Dylan offered to sing on the album, but ultimately realized it was important for the Band to make their own statement. Instead, Dylan signified his presence by contributing a cover painting. Barney Hoskyns has written that it is significant the painting depicts six musicians. The cover of Music From Big Pink was intended to establish the group as having a different outlook from the psychedelic culture of 1968. Photographer Elliott Landy flew to Toronto to photograph the assembled Danko, Manuel and Hudson families on the Danko chicken farm. A photo was inserted of Diamond and Nell Helm, who lived in Arkansas. The photo appeared on the cover with the caption “Next of Kin”.

The initial critical reception to the album was positive, though sales were slim. In Rolling Stone, Al Kooper’s rave review of Big Pink ended with the words, “This album was recorded in approximately two weeks. There are people who will work their lives away in vain and not touch it.”  which helped to draw public attention to it (even though Rolling Stone referred to them as “the band from Big Pink” instead of just “the Band”). The fact that Bob Dylan wrote one and co-wrote two of the songs on the album also attracted attention.

In 1968, “The Weight” peaked at #63 on Billboard’s Hot 100 singles chart in the US. The song was a bigger hit elsewhere, peaking at #35 in Canada, and #21 in the UK. The album peaked at #30 on Billboard’s Pop Albums chart in 1968, and then recharted as a #8 hit on the Top Internet Albums chart in 2000 (see 2000 in music). “The Weight” gained widespread popularity, from the Band’s performance of it at Woodstock on 17 August 1969 and due partially to its inclusion in the film Easy Rider, though it was omitted from the soundtrack because of licensing issues. A cover version by the band Smith was included on the soundtrack album instead.

In 2003, the album was ranked number 34 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The laid-back feel of the album attracted the attention of other major artists. For example, Eric Clapton cites the album’s roots rock style as what convinced him to quit Cream, and pursue the styles of Blind Faith, Delaney and Bonnie, Derek and the Dominos and his debut album. George Harrison was also impressed by the album’s musicianship and sense of camaraderie, and Roger Waters called it the second “most influential record in the history of rock and roll”, after Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, and said that it “affected Pink Floyd deeply, deeply, deeply.” (by wikipedia)

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None of the Band’s previous work gave much of a clue about how they would sound when they released their first album in July 1968. As it was, Music from Big Pink came as a surprise. At first blush, the group seemed to affect the sound of a loose jam session, alternating emphasis on different instruments, while the lead and harmony vocals passed back and forth as if the singers were making up their blend on the spot. In retrospect, especially as the lyrics sank in, the arrangements seemed far more considered and crafted to support a group of songs that took family, faith, and rural life as their subjects and proceeded to imbue their values with uncertainty. Some songs took on the theme of declining institutions less clearly than others, but the points were made musically as much as lyrically. Tenor Richard Manuel’s haunting, lonely voice gave the album much of its frightening aspect, while Rick Danko’s and Levon Helm’s rough-hewn styles reinforced the songs’ rustic fervor. The dominant instrument was Garth Hudson’s often icy and majestic organ, while Robbie Robertson’s unusual guitar work further destabilized the sound. The result was an album that reflected the turmoil of the late ’60s in a way that emphasized the tragedy inherent in the conflicts. Music from Big Pink came off as a shockingly divergent musical statement only a year after the ornate productions of Sgt. Pepper, and initially attracted attention because of the three songs Bob Dylan had either written or co-written. However, as soon as “The Weight” became a minor singles chart entry, the album and the group made their own impact, influencing a movement toward roots styles and country elements in rock. Over time, Music from Big Pink came to be regarded as a watershed work in the history of rock, one that introduced new tones and approaches to the constantly evolving genre. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Rick Danko (bass, fiddle, vocals)
Levon Helm (drums, tambourine, vocals)
Garth Hudson (keyboard, clavinet, saxophone)
Richard Manuel (keyboards, drums, vocals)
Robbie Robertson (guitar, vocals)
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John Simon (horn, saxophone, piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Tears Of Rage (Dylan/Manuel) 5.24
02. To Kingdom Come (Robertson) 3.23
03. In A Station (Manuel) 3.35
04. Caledonia Mission (Robertson) 2.59
05. The Weight (Robertson) 4.39
06. We Can Talk  (Manuel) 3.07
07. Long Black Veil (Wilkin/Dill) 3.06
08. Chest Fever (Robertson) 5.19
09. Lonesome Suzie (Manuel) 4.04
10. This Wheel’s On Fire (Dylan/Danko) 3.14
11. I Shall Be Released (Dylan) 3.19
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12. Yazoo Street Scandal (outtake) (Robertson) 4.02
13. Tears Of Rage (alternate take) (Dylan/Manuel) 5.32
14. Katie’s Been Gone (outtake) (Manuel/Robertson) 2.47
15. If I Lose (outtake) (Poole) 2.30
16. Long Distance Operator (outtake) (Dylan) 3.58
17. Lonesome Suzie (alternate take) (Manuel) 3.01
18. Orange Juice Blues (Blues for Breakfast) (outtake) (Manuel) 3.40
19. Key To The Highway (outtake) (Broonzy) 2.28
20. Ferdinand The Imposter (outtake) (Robertson) 4.00

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The “Big Pink” house in 2006

Fairport Convention – Liege & Lief (1969)

frontcover1Liege & Lief is the fourth album by the English folk rock band Fairport Convention. It is the third and final album the group released in the UK in 1969, all of which prominently feature Sandy Denny as lead female vocalist. (Denny did not appear on the group’s 1968 debut album). It is also the very first Fairport album on which all songs have either been adapted (freely) from traditional British and Celtic folk material (for example “Matty Groves”, “Tam Lin”), or else are original compositions (such as “Come All Ye”, “Crazy Man Michael”) written and performed in a similar style. By introducing songs of this genre into the group’s repertoire Denny, who had previously sung and recorded traditional folk songs as a solo artist, was instrumental in this transformation. Although Denny quit the band even before the album’s release, Fairport Convention has continued to the present day to make music almost exclusively within the traditional British folk music idiom, and are still most strongly associated with it.

The album was moderately successful, peaking at number 17 on the UK Albums Chart during a 15-week run. It is often credited, though the claim is sometimes disputed, as the first major “British folk rock” album. (This term is not to be confused with American-style folk rock, which had first achieved mainstream popularity on both sides of the Atlantic with The Byrds’ early work several years prior.) The popularity of Liege & Lief did a great deal to establish the new style commercially and artistically as a distinct genre. In an audience vote at the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards in 2006, the album was voted “Most Influential Folk Album of All Time”.

Following the motorway accident that had killed Martin Lamble, the band were left without a drummer. After the release of Unhalfbricking, Dave Mattacks took over the role and, having previously been a drummer at Mecca Ballrooms, had to “learn a whole new style of drumming.” Dave Swarbrick, a little older than the rest of the band, had already been in a successful duo with guitarist Martin Carthy. After his appearance on Unhalfbricking, he too joined Fairport full-time.

The band rehearsed and put together Liege & Lief over the summer of 1969 at a house in Farley Chamberlayne, near Braishfield, Winchester, launching it with a sold-out concert in London’s Royal Festival Hall late in 1969.

Gone were the covers of songs by Bob Dylan and others, replaced by electrified versions of traditional English folksongs and the first of a long line of instrumental medleys of folk dance tunes driven by Dave Swarbrick’s violin playing. Much of this material had been found by Ashley Hutchings in Cecil Sharp’s collection, maintained by the English Folk Dance and Song Society.

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The title is composed of two Middle English words: liege meaning loyal and lief meaning ready. The cover, a gatefold in grey and purple, featured cameo images of the band along with track listing and credits.

Soon after the release of Liege & Lief, Ashley Hutchings left to further pursue traditional music in a new band, Steeleye Span; Sandy Denny also left to form Fotheringay.

Liege & Lief was promoted by John Peel on his Top Gear radio programme[10] and the album spent fifteen weeks in the UK album chart, reaching number 17.[11] In a contemporary review, John Mendelsohn of Rolling Stone recommended the album only to devotees of “quietly arty traditional folk” and felt that “Deserter” is the only “arresting” song, as “not even the originals match up to the group-composed material on previous albums.”[12] Robert Christgau of The Village Voice gave Liege & Lief a “B–” and said that, because of his “anti-folk” tastes, he was disappointed with the album’s more traditional material after Unhalfbricking.

The album has come to be regarded as having a major influence in the development of British folk rock. It was voted the ‘most important folk album of all time’ by BBC Radio 2 listeners in 2002, and at the 2006 BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards Liege and Lief won the award for Most influential Folk Album of all time. At the event, the original line-up of Simon Nicol, Richard Thompson, Ashley Hutchings, Dave Swarbrick, Dave Mattacks, with Chris While replacing Sandy Denny, performed Matty Groves. Georgia Lucas, the daughter of Sandy Denny and Trevor Lucas, accepted the award on behalf of her late mother. This commemoration was repeated on 10 August 2007 at Cropredy, when the complete album was performed.

In a retrospective review, Allmusic’s Mark Deming said of the album that “while [it] was the most purely folk-oriented Fairport Convention album to date, it also rocked hard in a thoroughly original and uncompromising way”.[14] In June 2007, Mojo magazine listed Liege & Lief at number 58 in its list of “100 Records that changed the world”.

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Personnel:
Sandy Denny (vocals)
Ashley Hutchings (bass, background vocals)
Dave Mattacks (drums, percussion)
Simon Nicol (guitar, background vocals)
Dave Swarbrick (fiddle, viola)
Richard Thompson (guitar, background vocals)
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Tracklist:
01. Come All Ye (Denny/Hutchings) 4.55
02. Reynardine (Traditional) 4.33
03. Matty Groves (Traditional) 8.08
04. Farewell, Farewell (Thompson) 2.38
05. The Deserter (Traditional) 4.10
06. Medley 4.00
06.01. The Lark In he Morning  (Traditional)
06.02. Rakish Paddy  (Traditional)
06.03. Foxhunters’ Jig  (Traditional)
06.04. Toss the Feathers  (Traditional)
07. Tam Lin  (Traditional) 7.20
08. Crazy Man Michael (Thompson/Swarbrick) 4.35
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09. Sir Patrick Spens (Traditional) 4.02
10. Quiet Joys of Brotherhood (Traditional/Farina) 10.16

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Whistler – Ho Hum (1971)

frontcover1Whistler is one of the  forgotten 3 men progressive folk band from ealy ’70’s from UK. The release only one album in 1971 named Ho hum. The music is gentle and soft orchestrated, nice parts from mellow to more up tempo, with some good passages. My CD is papersleeve mini LP replica like is was release by Deram in first place 40 years ago. The album is ok, but is not among the most acomplished prog folk albums I’ve heared, remind me of or in same category with lets say Quicksand, even some Beatles moments can be found here. Acustical moments with some keyboards and flute added, a gentle ok offer, little to short from today standards. Nice cover art. (b_olariu )

The album title sums it all up.There’s nothing really wrong with it but on the other hand there’s nothing to really make me sit up and take notice.Knowing of Thin Lizzy axeman Eric Bell’s involvement I expected more.Pleasant but not memorable.Caravan.Barclay James Harvest comparisons-nay lad unless you’ve only heard BJH’s first 2 singles. (woody 123)

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Personnel:
John Chuter (guitar, bass, vocals)
George Howe (keyboards, guitar, vocals)
Ant Grout-Smith (keyboards, guitar, bass, saxophone, vocals)
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Eric Bell (guitar on 12.)
Tony Carr (percussion)
Clem Cattini (drums)
Jimmy Hastings (flute)
Gordon Huntley (pedal steel guitar)
Barry Morgan (drums)
Lisa Strike (background vocals)
Doris Troy (background vocals)
Douggie Wright (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Help Me (Chuter) 2.32
02. Hello Lady (Chuter) 2.47
03. I Can’t Believe My Eyes (Davis/Chuter) 2.50
04. City Boy (Howe) 2.02
05. Blind Leading The Blind (Davis/Howe) 2.34
06. Machine (Howe) 2.56
07. See The Wheels Are Turning (Chuter) 3.35
08. Whenever (Howe) 3.51
09. Do It For Mother (Davis/Howe) 2.48
10. Blind Man (Chuter) 3.50
11. Nothing At All (Chuter) 3.04
12. See What The Future Brings (Chuter) 3.55

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 Hey …. John Chuter – George Howe – Ant Grout-Smith … where are you now ?

Melanie – Old Bitch Warrior (1995)

FrontCover1Excellent title, substandard album. Melanie’s voice had slid from a vibrant, intense instrument to a thick, bellowing growl, and Old Bitch Warrior’s songs are dull, droning creatures, wrapped in plodding production that sorely lacks any lightness of touch. Some of her lyrics are affecting — “No Time to Smell the Flowers” mourns the passing of time with precision and clarity — but “Summer of Love” deals with matters she’d already handled more effectively on “Candles in the Rain.” And the re-recording of two songs from Freedom Knows My Name, as well as her standard “Beautiful People” (this time with an absurd drum loop), merely highlights the lack of fresh ideas. (by Charles Donovan)

And I can´t agree with this review … this is one of the finest Melanie albums ever recorded …  with a great depth and excellent music … And her voice is in a very good condition …

Listen to songs like “Rock In The Road”, “Beautiful People” or “I Will Survive”. And we will hear great versions of old hits like “Candles In The Rain” and “Ruby Tuesday”.

What a great album !

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Personnel:
Gary Burke (percussion)
Paul Harris (keyboards, clavinet)
Mindy Jostyn (violin)
Rob Leon (guitar, bass)
Melanie Safka Schekeryk (vocals, guitar)
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Jonathan Edwards (guitar, vocals on 07.)
Manray (vocals on 13.)
Meredith (Pop In Wonderland) (percussion on 08.)
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background vocals:
Beau Jarred Schekeryk – Jeordie Schekeryk – Leilah Schekeryk – Mindy Jostyn

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Tracklist:
01. Rock In The Road (Bruen) 3.45
02. No Time To Smell The Flowers (Safka) 4.11
03. Something Warm (Leary/Safka) 6.31
04. Old Bitch Warrior (Safka) 5.19
05. These Nights (Buskin/Batteau) 4.48
06. You Don’t Know Me (Safka) 3.52
07. I Don’t Know What Love Is (Edwards) 4.25
08. Beautiful People (Safka) 5.41
09. Any Time At All (Lennon/McCartney) 3.32
10. Freedom Knows My Name (Safka Schekeryk) 5.35
11. Summer Of Love (Safka) 4.44
12. Ballerina (Safka) 2.50
13. I Will Survive (Fekaris/Perren) 5.07
14. Candles In The Rain (Safka) 5.18
15. Ruby Tuesday (Jagger/Richards) 5.23
16. Look What They Done To My Song (Safka) 5.16

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Harry Chapin – Short Stories (1973)

FrontCover1Short Stories is the third studio album by the American singer/songwriter Harry Chapin, released in 1973. (see 1973 in music). “W·O·L·D”, “Mr Tanner” and “Mail Order Annie” remained amongst his most popular work for the rest of his life. “W·O·L·D” went to number 36 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

The pensive tales of personal relationships on Short Stories belong to a bygone era, when the summer of love was yielding to the autumn of adulthood and the mundane realities that attended it. Like Jim Croce and James Taylor, Harry Chapin observes the melancholy side of life in self-contained character studies: the midlife assessment of a failed career and marriage on the poignant “WOLD,” a dry cleaner whose pretense to a singing career is exposed on “Mr. Tanner,” the meager dreams of a poor farmer and his mail-order bride on “Mail Order Annie.” Yet the album’s overall tone is sober rather than somber. Perhaps “Song for Myself” expresses it best when Chapin offers up the challenge: “Are we all gonna sit here with a stoned out smile and simply watch the world go ‘way?” For the songwriter, it’s a rhetorical question. If the subjects are flawed, unhappy, unable to appreciate or hold on to love, it’s the reality left in the wake of the ’60s overweening idealism. The loss of free love is lamented on “They Call Her Easy,” replaced by the cynicism of experience in “Changes.” Musically, the album has much in common with the work of Cat Stevens, leaning on Paul Leka’s orchestral arrangements to embellish otherwise dry songs. Chapin lacks Stevens’ affection for inventive melodies and off-kilter rhythms, but compared to a toned-down record like Catch Bull at Four, the two are strikingly similar. The fact remains that casual fans will be better served with a greatest-hits compilation that includes “WOLD” than wading through all of Short Stories. Those with a predilection for Chapin’s bittersweet muse will be better served by the whole album. (by Dave Connolly)

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Personnel:
Bobby Carlin (drums)
Harry Chapin (guitar, vocals)
Paul Leka (keyboards)
Michael Masters (cello)
Ronald Palmer (guitar, vocals)
Buddy Salzman (drums)
Tim Scott (cello)
John Wallace (bass, vocals)
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Dave Armstrong (harmonica on 11.)
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Background vocals:
Tomi Lee Bradley  – Jeanne French – Jeb Hart – Rob White

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Tracklist:
01, Short Stories 4.37
02. W·O·L·D 5.15
03. Song For Myself  4.30
04. Song Man 3.15
05. Changes 4.32
10. They Call Her Easy 4.05
11. Mr. Tanner 5.12
12. Mail Order Annie 4.56
13. There’s A Lot Of Lonely People Tonight 3.45
14. Old College Avenue 4.19

All songs written by Harry Chapin

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Illustratration