The Byrds – Younger Than Yesterday (1967)

LPFrontCover1So you want to be a Rock N Roll star …

The Byrds  were an American rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1964. The band underwent multiple lineup changes throughout its existence, with frontman Roger McGuinn (known as Jim McGuinn until mid-1967) remaining the sole consistent member. Although they only managed to attain the huge commercial success of contemporaries like the Beatles, the Beach Boys, and the Rolling Stones for a short period in the mid-1960s, the Byrds are today considered by critics to be nearly as influential as those bands. Their signature blend of clear harmony singing and McGuinn’s jangly twelve-string Rickenbacker guitar was “absorbed into the vocabulary of rock” and has continued to be influential.

Initially, the band pioneered the musical genre of folk rock as a popular format in 1965, by melding the influence of the Beatles and other British Invasion bands with contemporary and traditional folk music on their first and second albums, and the hit singles “Mr. Tambourine Man” and “Turn! Turn! Turn!”. As the 1960s progressed, the band was influential in originating psychedelic rock and raga rock, with their song “Eight Miles High” and the albums Fifth Dimension (1966), Younger Than Yesterday (1967) and The Notorious Byrd Brothers (1968). They also played a pioneering role in the development of country rock, with the 1968 album Sweetheart of the Rodeo representing their fullest immersion into the genre.

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The original five-piece lineup of the Byrds consisted of Jim McGuinn (lead guitar, vocals), Gene Clark (tambourine, vocals), David Crosby (rhythm guitar, vocals), Chris Hillman (bass guitar, vocals), and Michael Clarke (drums). This version of the band was relatively short-lived; by early 1966, Clark had left due to problems associated with anxiety and his increasing isolation within the group. The Byrds continued as a quartet until late 1967, when Crosby and Clarke also departed. McGuinn and Hillman decided to recruit new members, including country rock pioneer Gram Parsons, but by late 1968, Hillman and Parsons had also exited the band. McGuinn elected to rebuild the band’s membership; between 1968 and 1973, he helmed a new incarnation of the Byrds that featured guitarist Clarence White, among others. McGuinn disbanded the then-current lineup in early 1973 to make way for a reunion of the original quintet. The Byrds’ final album was released in March 1973, with the reunited group disbanding later that year.

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Several former members of the band went on to successful careers of their own, either as solo artists or as members of such groups as Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, the Flying Burrito Brothers and the Desert Rose Band. In 1991, the Byrds were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, an occasion that saw the five original members performing together for the last time. Gene Clark died of a heart attack later that year, while Michael Clarke died of liver failure in 1993. McGuinn, Crosby, and Hillman remain active.

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Younger Than Yesterday is the fourth studio album by the American rock band the Byrds and was released on February 6, 1967 on Columbia Records (see 1967 in music). It saw the band continuing to integrate elements of psychedelia and jazz into their music, a process they had begun on their previous album, Fifth Dimension. In addition, the album captured the band and record producer Gary Usher experimenting with new musical textures, including brass instruments, reverse tape effects and an electronic oscillator.

The album also marked the emergence of the band’s bass player Chris Hillman as a talented songwriter and vocalist. Prior to Younger Than Yesterday, Hillman had only received one shared writing credit with the Byrds, but this album saw him credited as the sole composer of four songs and a co-writer of “So You Want to Be a Rock ‘n’ Roll Star”.[5] Byrds expert Tim Connors has remarked that two of Hillman’s compositions on Younger Than Yesterday exhibited country and western influences and thus can be seen as early indicators of the country rock experimentation that would feature—to a greater or lesser degree—on all of the Byrds’ subsequent albums.

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Upon release, the album peaked at number 24 on the Billboard Top LPs chart and reached number 37 on the UK Albums Chart. It was preceded by the “So You Want to Be a Rock ‘n’ Roll Star” single in January 1967, which reached the Top 30 of the Billboard Hot 100.[10] Two additional singles taken from the album, “My Back Pages” and “Have You Seen Her Face”, were also moderately successful on the Billboard singles chart. However, none of the singles taken from the album charted in the United Kingdom. Music critics Richie Unterberger and David Fricke have both remarked that although it was largely overlooked by the public at the time of its release, the album’s critical standing has improved over the years and today Younger Than Yesterday is considered one of the Byrds’ best albums. The title of Younger Than Yesterday is derived from the lyrics of “My Back Pages”, a song written by Bob Dylan, which was covered on the album. (wikipedia)

AdYounger Than Yesterday was somewhat overlooked at the time of its release during an intensely competitive era that found the Byrds on a commercial downslide. Time, however, has shown it to be the most durable of the Byrds’ albums, with the exception of Mr. Tambourine Man. David Crosby, Roger McGuinn, and especially Chris Hillman come into their own as songwriters on an eclectic but focused set blending folk-rock, psychedelia, and early country-rock. The sardonic “So You Want to Be a Rock & Roll Star” was a terrific single; “My Back Pages,” also a small hit, was the last of their classic Dylan covers; “Thoughts and Words,” the flower-power anthem “Renaissance Fair,” “Have You Seen Her Face,” and the bluegrass-tinged “Time Between” are all among their best songs. The jazzy “Everybody’s Been Burned” may be Crosby’s best composition, although his “Mind Gardens” is one of his most excessive. (by Richie Unterberger)

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Except the song “Mind Gardens”, this whole album is another flawless masterpiece by The Byrds. All the songs are hook filled and the whole album is very much in the vein of The Beatles’ Revolver – a lot of dreamy songs, backward guitars, avant garde instrumentation and Beatlesque harmonies especially the song “Have You Seen Her Face” – which is very Beatlesque. It also features their next best (after Mr Tambourine Man of course) Dylan cover – My Back Pages. Beautiful singing with jangly guitar tones make it a fresh listen even now. The confessional Everybody’s Been Burned is another major highlight. But still compared to their previous album, I would consider it a tad restrained – the previous album oozed freedom and experimentation where as this one sounds a little restrained overall. Nevertheless, it is a brilliant album and a great release for 1967, which also had so many other iconic albums. (Adithya Paikray)

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Personnel:
Michael Clarke (drums)
David Crosby (guitar, vocals)
Chris Hillman (bass, vocals)
Jim McGuinn (vocals, guitar)
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Vern Gosdin (guitar)
Hugh Masekela (horns)
Clarence White (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. So You Want To Be A Rock ‘N’ Roll Star (McGuinn/Hillman) 2.06
02. Have You Seen Her Face (Hillman) 2.41
03. C.T.A. – 102 (McGuinn/Hippard) 2.28
04. Renaissance Fair (Crosby/McGuinn) 1.52
05. Time Between (Hillman) 1.55
06. Everybody’s Been Burned (Crosby) 3.06
07. Thoughts And Words (Hillman) 2.58
08. Mind Gardens (Crosby) 3.19
09. The Byrds My Back Pages (Dylan) 3.09
10. The Girl With No Name (Hillman) 1.50
11. Why (McGuinn/Crosby) 2.47
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12 It Happens Each Day (Crosby) 2.46
13. Don’t Make Waves (McGuinn/Hillman) 1.38
14. My Back Pages (Alternate Version) (Dylan) 2.44
15. Mind Gardens (Alternate Version) (Crosby) 3.47
16. Lady Friend (Crosby) 7.40
17. Old John Robertson (Single Version) R. McGuinn, C. Hillman Rate

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More from The Byrds:
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So you want to be a rock ‘n’ roll star?
Then listen now to what I say
Just get an electric guitar
Then take some time and learn how to play

And with your hair swung right
And your pants too tight
It’s gonna be alright

Then it’s time to go downtown
Where the agent man won’t let you down
Sell your soul to the company
Who are waiting there to sell plasticware

And in a week or two
If you make the charts
The girls’ll tear you apart

The price you paid for your riches and fame
Was it all a strange game?
You’re a little insane

The money, the game and the public acclaim
Don’t forget what you are
You’re a rock ‘n’ roll star

Steve Ashley – Stroll On (1974)

FrontCover1Steve Frank Ashley (born 9 March 1946) is an English singer-songwriter, recording artist, multi-instrumentalist, writer and graphic designer. Ashley is best known as a songwriter and first gained public recognition for his work with his debut solo album, Stroll On (Gull, 1974). Taking his inspiration from English traditional songs, Ashley has developed a songwriting style, which is contemporary in content while reflecting traditional influences in his melodies, poetry and vocal delivery.

Stroll On is the debut album by British singer-songwriter Steve Ashley. It was released in April 1974 in LP format on Gull Records and was critically acclaimed in the UK, being awarded “Contemporary Folk album of the Year” in the leading monthly folk magazine, Folk Review.[5] It has been described as “a masterful, beautifully textured and gentle epic” and “a masterpiece of its kind – a beautiful, rich and deeply atmospheric collection of very English songs, like a musical impression of Dickens, Victorian Christmas cards and Thomas Hardy’s Wessex with a running concept concerning seasonal change”.[6] According to the music collectors’ magazine Goldmine, it is “one of the key albums in the SteveAshley01entire history of English Folk Rock”.

An extended version with three additional tracks, Stroll On Revisited, was released in 1999 as a CD on Market Square Records.

In 1971 Austin John Marshall arranged a production and publishing deal for Steve Ashley with Harbrook Music which gave Ashley free access to recording time at London’s Olympic Studios to record his first album. At this time Marshall also played the early demo tapes to music critic Karl Dallas, who interviewed Ashley for Melody Maker.

Acting as producer for Harbrook Productions, Marshall hired Robert Kirby to create string arrangements for many of Ashley’s songs. He also hired a number of musicians to back Ashley, including members of Fairport Convention and Pentangle, plus a section of the London Symphony Orchestra, directed by Kirby. By the late summer of 1971 the first version of Ashley’s debut album was completed and offered to a number of major and independent labels.

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By the spring of 1972 however, the album was still unplaced with a label, and then Ashley was invited by Ashley Hutchings to join the first touring ensemble of The Albion Country Band. This line-up included ex-Fairport members Hutchings, Simon Nicol and Dave Mattacks, plus American fiddler Sue Draheim and ex-Young Tradition singer, Royston Wood. Sharing the lead vocal role with Wood, Ashley performed a few of his own songs plus a number of folk songs, including a 17-verse ballad, “Lord Bateman”. The Albion Country Band was signed to Island Records but the band broke up before recording, after just nine months together.

In November 1972, Ashley signed a solo recording deal with Gull Records and, with a few track changes, his long-delayed first album was finally released in April 1974, entitled Stroll On.

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The original track listing was changed prior to release when the deal with Gull was signed and “Silly Summer Games” was re-recorded, while “Love in a Funny Way” was removed along with “Spirit of Christmas” to make way for “Lord Bateman” (with the Albion Country Band).

After its UK release in April 1974 the album was also licensed for release in the Netherlands and Belgium through Dureco; in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland through the German record label Teldec; and in Australia and New Zealand through Astor Records. In 1975 the album was licensed for manufacture and distribution in the United States and Canada through Motown.

“Old Rock ‘n’ Roll”, with “Fire and Wine” on the B side, was issued in 1974 as a single in the UK and in New Zealand.

Single

Stroll On was met with widespread critical acclaim in the UK. In The Daily Telegraph, Maurice Rosenbaum declared: “Ashley’s own songs are the product of an extraordinary gift for creating material of true folk quality” and, in Melody Maker, Karl Dallas hailed it as “the finest album since folk became contemporary”. At the end of 1974 it was awarded “Contemporary Folk album of the Year” in the leading monthly folk magazine, Folk Review.

Music journalist Colin Harper described it as “a masterful, beautifully textured and gentle epic” and “a masterpiece of its kind – a beautiful, rich and deeply atmospheric collection of very English songs, like a musical impression of Dickens, Victorian Christmas cards and Thomas Hardy’s Wessex with a running concept concerning seasonal change”.

The June 1999 issue of Mojo magazine featured the original Stroll On in its regular full-page series “Buried Treasure”.

Lee Blackstone, writing in RootsWorld, said: “Stroll On: Revisited is a classic album in every sense. The musical guests run the gamut of the English folk-rock scene, but, mind you, this isn’t a case of spoiled broth. Rather, Stroll On manages to be a well-orchestrated calendar album, with the play of seasons the overarching theme… Incredibly, the entire album has worn remarkably well and it bears the stamp of timelessness that the best British folk-rock can conjure… As a debut album, Stroll On is remarkably mature, and Ashley’s magical achievement can now be savored again.”

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Keith Hadad, reviewing the album on Record Crates United, said: “[T]he range of influences on Stroll On is daringly unique. British and American folk and rock traditions have been seamlessly blended in with elements of Irish and classical music as well… Ashley’s starkly echoing vocals [on “Springsong”] sometimes harken back to Celtic choral singing while Kirby’s string arrangement is reminiscent of the Pastoral composers, like Ralph Vaughan Williams. Meanwhile the only percussion present in the song is a tabla being played in the traditional Hindustani style… [it] works beautifully here, making this an absolute highlight of the record.”

Alan Rose, for The Living Tradition magazine, said: “‘Stroll On’ was released in 1974 amid critical acclaim, which all these years later seems eminently justified. The very first track led to his alternative title of ‘The Fire and Wine Guy’, and after twenty-five years its lush harmonies, electric arrangement and sound philosophy ensure that its magic is undiminished… Ashley’s songs are packed with life-affirming, earth-touching sentiments, deceptively simple at first hearing but unfolding at each repeat to display deeper meanings with staggeringly intelligent and original use of language.” (wikipedia)

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Personnel:
Steve Ashley (vocals, guitar, harmonica, whistle)
Richard Byers (guitar, mandolin, background vocals)
B. J. Cole (pedal steel guitar)
Claire Dawson (background vocals)
Brian Diprose (bass)
Barry Dransfield (fiddle)
Thom Friedlein (bass)
Chris Karan (tablas)
Dave Mattacks (drums)
Redd McReady (harpsichord)
Lea Nicholson (concertina)
Dave Pegg (bass, mandolin)
Daryl Runswick (bass)
Danny Thompson (bass)
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Albion Country Band Mk1 1972:
(Ashley Hutchings, Royston Wood, Steve Ashley, Simon Nicol, Sue Draheim and Dave Mattacks) on 10.)

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Tracklist:
01. Fire And Wine (Ashley) 4.36
02. Finite Time (Ashley/Menday) 2.54
03. Silly Summer Games (Ashley) 4.51
04. Springsong (Ashley) 3.30
05. Monkey Puzzle Tree (Ashley) 2.58
06. Farewell Green Leaves (Ashley) 4.28
07. Morris Minor (Ashley) 1.35
08. Candlemas Carol (Ashley) 3.03
09. John Donne Song (Donne/Ashley) 5.24
10. Lord Bateman (Child 53; Roud 40) (Traditional) 8.45
11. Follow On (Ashley) 3.31

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Steve Ashley is a unique performer whose voice can convey great power and great tenderness. He has performed since the 1960s, when he was popular in the folk clubs of West London, and his style might be described as folk-influenced social commentary. He is one of the great treasures of English music. (ukfestivalguides.com)

Still alive & well: Steve Ashley and his website from 2020:
website

Crispian St. Peters – You Were On My Mind + What I´m Gonna Be (1966)

FrontCover1Crispian St. Peters (born Robin Peter Smith, 5 April 1939 – 8 June 2010) was an English pop singer-songwriter, best known for his work in the 1960s, particularly hit songs written by duo The Changin’ Times, including “The Pied Piper” and Ian & Sylvia’s “You Were on My Mind”.

Robin Peter Smith was born in Swanley, Kent, and attended Swanley Secondary Modern School. He learned the guitar and left school in 1954 to become an assistant cinema projectionist. As a young man, he performed in several relatively unknown bands in England. In 1956, he gave his first live performance, as a member of The Hard Travellers. Through the late 1950s and early 1960s, as well as undertaking National Service, he was a member of The Country Gentlemen, Beat Formula Three, and Peter & The Wolves.

While a member of Beat Formula Three in 1963, he was heard by David Nicholson, an EMI publicist who became his manager. Nicholson suggested he use a stage name, initially “Crispin Blacke” and subsequently Crispian St. Peters, then promoted his client as being nineteen years of age, shaving off five years from his actual age of 24. In 1964, as a member of Peter & The Wolves, St. Peters made his first commercial recording. He was persuaded to turn solo by Nicholson and was signed to Decca Records in 1965. His first two singles on this record label, “No No No” and “At This Moment”, proved unsuccessful on the charts. He made two television UK appearances in February of that year, featuring in the shows Scene at 6.30 and Ready Steady Go!

SheetMusicIn 1966, St. Peters’ career finally yielded a Top 10 hit in the UK Singles Chart, with “You Were on My Mind,”a song written and first recorded in 1964 by the Canadian folk duo, Ian & Sylvia, and a hit in the United States for We Five in 1965. St. Peters’ single eventually hit No. 2 in the UK and was then released in the US on the Philadelphia-based Jamie Records label. It did not chart in the US until after his fourth release, “The Pied Piper,” became known as his signature song and a Top 10 hit in the United States and the UK.

Although his next single, a version of Phil Ochs’ song “Changes,” also reached the charts in both the UK and US, it was much less successful. In 1967, St. Peters released his first LP, Follow Me…, which included several of his own songs, as well as the single “Free Spirit”. One of them, “I’ll Give You Love,” was recorded by Marty Kristian in a version produced by St. Peters, and became a big hit in Australia. St. Peters’ album was followed by his first EP, Almost Persuaded, yet by 1970, he was dropped by Decca. “You Were on My Mind” was featured in the 1996 German film Jenseits Der Stille (Beyond Silence).

Later in 1970, he was signed to Square Records. Under this new record deal, St. Peters released a second LP, Simply, that year, predominantly of country and western songs. Later still they released his first cassette, The Gospel Tape, in 1986, and a second cassette, New Tracks on Old Lines in 1990. His third cassette, Night Sessions, Vol. 1 was released in 1993.

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Several CDs also came from this record deal, including Follow Me in 1991, The Anthology in 1996, Night Sessions, Vol. 1 in 1998, The Gospel Tape in 1999, and, finally, Songs From The Attic in 2000. He also performed on various Sixties nostalgia tours, and continued to write and arrange for others until his later ill health.

From 1969 to 1974, St. Peters was married to Collette. The marriage produced a daughter, Samantha, and a son, Lee.

On 1 January 1995, at the age of 55, he suffered a stroke. His music career was severely weakened by this, and in 2001 he announced his retirement from the music industry. He was hospitalised several times with pneumonia after 2003.

St. Peters died on 8 June 2010, after a long illness, at the age of 71. (wikipedia)

Acetate:
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And here´s is very sucessful single … a soft Folk-Pop version of the classic song written by Sylvia Fricker.

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Personnel:
Crispian St. Peters (vocals)
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a bunch of unknow studio musicians

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Tracklist:
01. You Were On My Mind (Fricker) 2.42
02. What I´m Gonna Be (St. Peters) 2.23

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Crispian St. Peters (5 April 1939 – 8 June 2010)

Janis Ian – The Secret Life Of J. Eddy Fink (1968)

FrontCover1A singer/songwriter both celebrated and decried for her pointed handling of taboo topics, Janis Ian enjoyed one of the more remarkable second acts in music history. After first finding success as a teen, her career slumped, only to enter a commercial resurgence almost a decade later. Janis Eddy Fink was born on May 7, 1951, in New York City. The child of a music teacher, she studied piano as a child and, drawing influence from Edith Piaf, Billie Holiday, and Odetta, wrote her first songs at the age of 12. She soon entered Manhattan’s High School of Music and Art, where she began performing at school functions. After adopting the surname Ian (her brother’s middle name), she quickly graduated to the New York folk circuit. When she was just 15, she recorded her self-titled debut; the LP contained “Society’s Child (Baby I’ve Been Thinking),” a meditation on interracial romance written by Ian while waiting to meet with her school guidance counselor. While banned by a few radio stations, the single failed to attract much notice until conductor Leonard Bernstein invited its writer to perform the song on his television special Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution. The ensuing publicity and furor over its subject matter pushed “Society’s Child” into the upper rungs of the pop charts, and made Ian an overnight sensation. Success did not agree with her, however, and she soon dropped out of high school. In rapid succession, Ian recorded three more LPs — 1967’s For All the Seasons of Your Mind, 1968’s The Secret Life of J. Eddy Fink, and 1969’s Who Really Cares — but gave away the money she earned to friends and charities.

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After meeting photojournalist Peter Cunningham at a peace rally, the couple married, and at age 20, she announced her retirement from the music business. The marriage failed, however, and she returned in 1971 with the poorly received Present Company. After moving to California to hone her writing skills in seclusion, Ian resurfaced three years later with Stars, which featured the song “Jesse,” later a Top 30 hit for Roberta Flack. With 1975’s Between the Lines, Ian eclipsed all of her previous success; not only did the LP achieve platinum status, but the delicate single “At Seventeen” reached the Top Three and won a Grammy. While subsequent releases like 1977’s Latin-influenced Miracle Row, 1979’s Night Rains, and 1981’s Restless Eyes earned acclaim, they sold poorly. Ian was dropped by her label and spent 12 years without a contract before emerging in 1993 with Breaking Silence (the title a reference to her recent admission of homosexuality), which pulled no punches in tackling material like domestic violence, frank eroticism, and the Holocaust. Similarly, 1995’s Revenge explored prostitution and homelessness. Two years later Ian returned with Hunger; God & the FBI followed in the spring of 2000. A live set, Working Without a Net, appeared from Rude Girl Records in 2003, and a DVD, Live at Club Cafe, saw release in 2005. Folk Is the New Black appeared as a joint release from Rude Girl and Cooking Vinyl in 2006. (by Jason Ankeny)

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Janis Fink is Ian’s real name, and her concerns moved more toward the personal on her third album. “42nd St. Psycho Blues” was her unhappy commentary on what having a pop music career had been like, while “When I Was a Child” found her reminiscing regretfully about what had happened to her. Other songs waxed poetic, and producer Shadow Morton kept recreating the folk-rock sound of “Society’s Child,” but nothing here caught fire, and this album failed to chart, seeming to confirm that Ian would be a one-hit wonder, over the hill at 17. With a few years to think about it, of course, she’d have some trenchant things to say about that age. (by William Ruhlmann)

JanisIan03“The Secret Life of J. Eddy Fink” is an 11 track collection of “challenging” folk rock songs by the great Janis Ian. This album is now 44 years old. In 1968 Janis Ian was only 17, and this album was her third release. The album barely registered with the American record buying public. Some people called the album “pretentious”, a word that really doesn’t fit in with the character of Janis Ian. Her songs are intense, passionate, intelligent, and powerful, and often concentrate on serious social and personal themes. There are few songwriters who can write about these topics, while backing her often serious lyrics with beautiful, wistful melodies.

Janis’ songs were never overly commercial, and perhaps this aspect of her songwriting has halted the success she has always deserved, but never really achieved. Like so many great songwriters who have many great songs to their credit, Janis Ian is unfortunately best remembered for her two songs, “Society’s Child”, and “At Seventeen”.

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Yet, this great New York songstress, has released many great albums, some of them classics, but not recognized as such. She has never fully received the recognition she deserves for her utterly brilliant songs, and marvellous guitar technique. The late, great Chet Atkins once called Janis “a genius”, not just for her guitar talents, but also her songwriting ability. Janis Ian remains one of today’s great singer/songwriters. From her teenage days she has remained faithful to her uncompromising songs, and has never sold out to commerciality. (overdoseoffingalcocoa.blogspot.com)

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Personnel:
Vinent Bell (guitar)
Richie Havens (conga drums)
Carol Hunter (guitar, bass)
Janis Ian (guitar, keyboards, vocals)
Joe Price (bongo drums)
Buddy Saltzman (trap drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Everybody Knows 2.49
02. Mistaken Identity 7.11
03. Friends Again 1.45
04. 42nd Street Psycho Blues 3.53
05. She’s Made Of Porcelain 2.33
06. Sweet Misery 3.31
07. When I Was A Child 3.47
08. What Do You Think of the Dead? 3.21
09. Look To The Rain 5.11
10. Son Of Love 3.08
11. Baby’s Blue 5.12

All songs written by Janis Ian

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Still alive and well … her website in 2020:
Website

Bob Dylan – Folk Rogue (1998)

FrontCover1This album is one to grab for several reasons. First of all, The Newport shows from Freebody Park are essential both to any serious Dylan collection, as well as to any music historian. This set compares the sublime acoustic folk ’64 show to the infamous ‘Electric’ ’65 show that forever changed the face of folk, rock, and folk-rock music. The entire CD is soundboard recordings, and this is the best sounding Newport recordings ever. The filler material is of fascinating historical importance as well. The two missing songs from the newly discovered Hollywood Bowl show. Finally, the aesthetics are nice andthe venue information is complete. (bobsboots.com)

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In the span of exactly 365 days, from his July 26, 1964, appearance at the famed Newport Folk Festival to his return on July 25, 1965, Bob Dylan rocketed from folk luminary to lightning rod. After first abandoning the protest themes of his classic early anthems to focus on more poetic, personal subjects, Dylan next forsook the rigid traditions of roots music to go electric, drawing on the spirit of rock & roll to forge a revolutionary and controversial sound all his own. The must-have bootleg release Folk Rogue 1964-1965 contains both Newport sets in their entirety, and the contrast is extraordinary: while the 1964 audience treats sublime, introspective songs like “It Ain’t Me, Babe” and “All I Really Want to Do” with reverence and awe, the 1965 crowd seems poised on the brink of anarchy, and regardless of whether the catalyst was the elemental ferocity of the music, the inadequate sound system, or the brevity of the three-song set, the tension is palpable, and it elevates Dylan and his band to remarkable heights.

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Adding a pair of songs from Dylan’s September 3, 1965, show at Los Angeles’ Hollywood Bowl for good measure, Folk Rogue 1964-1965 remains the definitive single-disc presentation of this landmark material. Soundboard-quality fidelity and tasteful packaging complete an essential collection, although Dandelion’s two-disc From Newport to the Ancient Empty Streets in LA adds the Hollywood Bowl show in its entirety while subtracting “It Ain’t Me Babe” from the 1964 Newport appearance, so comparison shopping is recommended. (by Jason Ankeny)

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Personnel:
Bob Dylan (guitar, vocals, harmonica)
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The Paul Butterfield Blues Band (08. – 10.)
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Joan Baez (background vocals on 01.)

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Tracklist:
01. It Ain’t Me, Babe 3.39
02 All I Really Want To Do 4.09
03. To Ramona 4.33
04. Mr. Tambourine Man 7.27
05. Chimes Of Freedom 8.00
06. Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright 3.33
07. All I Really Want To Do 1.37
08. Maggies Farm 6.47
09. Like A Rolling Stone 5.54
10. Phantom Engineer 4.13
11. Tombstone Blues 4.45
12. It Ain’t Me, Babe 4.38
13. We Want Bobby 1.56
14. It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue 5.33
15. Mr. Tambourine Man 6.55

All songs written by Bob Dylan

Track 1 recorded July 24, 1964 at the Newport Folk Festival with Joan Baez
Tracks 2-5 recorded July 26, 1964 at the Newport Folk Festival
Track 6 recorded May 6, 1965 at City Hall, Newcastle, U.K.
Track 7 recorded July 24, 1965 at the Newport Folk Festival afternoon workshop
Tracks 8-10 recorded July 25, 1965 at the Newport Folk Festival with the Butterfield Blues Band
Tracks 11-12 recorded September 3, 1965 at the Hollywood Bowl, Hollywood, California
Tracks 13-15 recorded July 25, 1965 at the Newport Folk Festival

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More Bob Dylan:
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Neil Young – Live At Jones Beach Music Theater, Wantagh, NY (1989)

FrontCover1This is a real great Neil Young bootleg, a solo unplugged concert:

The Jones Beach concert is comes off rather lifeless and uninspired…the excellent production simply accentuates a lack of passion here. It’s Neil solo and you are missing Crazy Horse after awhile. I never thought I’d say that because just Neil with a guitar, harmonica & piano is a wonderful thing…usually. The highlight is the closing encore with Bruce Springsteen on “Down By The River”. The Boss’ presence gives Neil a little kick in the ass.

Jumping ahead to the SNL performances…the broadcast portion is common to us all but the rehearsals are really something! Neil is a possessed animal and there is the best version of “Rockin’ In The Free World” featured in this segment, hands down. This is Neil at his most passionate ever. I remember seeing the original broadcast and going “holy shit!”. I did the same thing again upon viewing this portion of the DVD. Great stuff!

The sound and video both are superb and makes this an easy purchase for Neil Young fans. (hotwacks.com)

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Personnel:
Ben Keith (dobro, keyboards, vocals)
Frank Sampedro (guitar. mandolin, vocals)
Neil Young (guitar, vocals, hrmonica, piano)
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Bruce Springsteen (guitar, vocals on 20.)

Alternate frontcover:
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Tracklist:
01. 1. My My, Hey Hey (Out Of The Blue) 3.57
02. Rockin’ In The Free World 5.12
03. Comes A Time 3.16
04. Sugar Mountain 6.10
05. Pocahontas 5.10
06. Helpless 5.41
07. Crime In the City (Sixty To Zero Part 1) 6,37
08. For The Turnstiles 5.49
09. This Old House 4.58
10. Roll Another Number 3.39
11. Too Far Gone 3.18
12. This Note’s For You 3,29
13. The Needle And The Damage Done 2.16
14. No More 5.13
15. After The Gold Rush 5.21
16. Heart Of Gold 3.25
17. Ohio 4.40
18. Rockin’ In The Free World 6.34
19. Powderfinger 5.51
20. Down By The River 9.35

All songs written by Neil Young

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More from Neil Young:
More

Well I dreamed I saw the knights in armor comin’
Sayin’ something about a queen
There were peasants singin’ and drummers drummin’
And the archer split the tree
There was a fanfare blowin’ to the sun
That was floating on the breeze
Look at Mother Nature on the run
In the 1970s
Look at Mother Nature on the run
In the 1970s

I was lyin’ in a burned out basement
With the full moon in my eyes
I was hopin’ for replacement
When the sun burst though the sky
There was a band playin’ in my head
And I felt like getting high
I was thinkin’ about what a friend had said
I was hopin’ it was a lie
Thinkin’ about what a friend had said
I was hopin’ it was a lie

Well, I dreamed I saw the silver space ships flyin’
In the yellow haze of the sun
There were children cryin’ and colors flyin’
All around the chosen ones
All in a dream, all in a dream
The loadin’ had begun
Flying Mother Nature’s silver seed
To a new home in the sun
Flying Mother Nature’s silver seed
To a new home

The Band – Islands (1977)

FrontCover1Islands is the seventh studio album by the Canadian-American rock group the Band. Released in 1977 to mixed reviews, it is the final studio album from the group’s original lineup.

Primarily composed of previously unreleased songs from the Band’s career (including their 1976 cover of “Georgia on My Mind”, which was recorded to aid Jimmy Carter in his presidential bid), Islands was released to fulfill the group’s contract with Capitol Records, so that the soundtrack to their film The Last Waltz could be released on Warner Bros. Records. In the CD liner notes, Robbie Robertson compares the album to the Who’s Odds & Sods. (wikipedia)

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Ever since I first heard the magnificent ‘Acadian Driftwood’ and marvelled in particular at Garth Hudson’s tasteful use of synthesiser, it has always been a mystery to me why The Band’s last album, Northern Lights, Southern Cross, wasn’t universally hailed as an all-time classic.

I reckon it vies pretty closely with their second one as being the best Band album of them all, and if you missed it or were dissuaded from listening to it by some bird brained ‘critic’, then you are well and truly advised to make amends.

Meanwhile, the boys from Woodstock, who you may remember ceased operations earlier in the year – and held a million dollar bash in San Francisco to convince everybody of the fact – have gone and made another album! A good job too, because while almost every other ‘established’ band in America has become hopelessly erratic, or splintered off into and thousand and one nebulous side-trips, The Band remain constant, as reassuring an outfit as there’s ever been in rock music.

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I can’t for one minute believe that there are any of you out there who are not 100% convinced of the outstanding contribution The Band have made to contemporary American music, so I will not waste my limited supply of superlatives on preaching to the converted. I will employ then instead to transmit the pleasure I’ve gained from repeatedly listening to this new album.

At first I must admit that I was disappointed with it, and Richard Williams’ unfavourable review in MM seemed less of a hatchet job than it does now. However, I continued to play it day and night, and sure enough, its intricacies, subtle melodies and lyrical strength began to permeate my bleary senses.

It’s true it hasn’t got an epic on the scale of ‘Acadian Driftwood’, or a ballad with the power and beauty of ‘It Makes No Difference’ (we can really only expect to hear a handful of songs like that every year), but Islands does have many oustanding moments. Robbie Robertson, as usual, dominates the songwriting credits, and of the eight cuts which he wrote or co-wrote, ‘Right As Rain’ (also the new single), ‘Let The Night Fall’, a superb song called ‘Christmas Must Be Tonight’, and the somewhat ethereal instrumental title track are all well up to accepted Band standards, while the other songs, substantial thought they are, do not (for my ears) distinguish themselves individually yet.

Two standards, ‘Georgia On My Mind’ and ‘Ain’t That A Lot Of Love’, complete the album, and are treated with the same degree of sensitivity and enthusiastic reappraisal that made their ‘oldies’ album, Moondog Matinee, such a success.

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The quality of the arrangements, musicianship and production are, naturally, faultless; and if there is much less evidence of Robbie Robertson’s precise and imaginative playing than I would have liked, the splendidly authoritative work of Garth Hudson and Richard Manuel, in particular, compensate to some extent.

Although (God help me) I can’t for the life of me find ANY of my Band albums except the last one, I’ve never yet heard a record of theirs that I didn’t like a great deal, and the same goes for this one. I’ve already spent more time listening to it than all but three or four other albums released this year, and its several memorable passages stand up to the most exacting comparisons.

Even if they carry out their intention of staying off the road, I sincerely hope they keep making records for a very long time, especially if they are as good as this. (by Andy Childs. from ZigZag magazine, May 1977.)

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Personnel:
Rick Danko (bass, vocals)
Levon Helm (drums, vocals)
Garth Hudson (keyboards, piccolo, saxophone)
Richard Manuel (keyboards, vocals)
Robbie Robertson (guitars, vocal on 09.)
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Jim Gordon (flute on 06.)
Tom Malone (trombone on 06.)
Larry Packer (violin on 06.)
John Simon (saxophone on 06.)

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Tracklist:
01. Right As Rain (Robertson) 3.52
02. Street Walker (Robertson/Danko) 3.16
03. Let The Night Fall (Robertson) 3.11
04. Ain’t That A Lot Of Love (Banks/Parker) 3.08
05. Christmas Must Be Tonight (Robertson) 3.37
06. Islands (Robertson/Hudson/Danko) 3.54
07. The Saga Of Pepote Rouge /Robertson) 4.15
08. Georgia On My Mind (Carmichael/Gorrell) 3.09
09. Knockin’ Lost John (Robertson) 3.52
10. Livin’ In A Dream (Robertson) 2.51

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More from The Band:
More

Rick Danko
(December 29, 1943 – December 10, 1999)

Levon Helm
(May 26, 1940 – April 19, 2012)

Richard Manuel
(April 3, 1943 – March 4, 1986)

Steve Goodman – Words We Can Dance To (1976)

FrontCover1Steven Benjamin Goodman (July 25, 1948 – September 20, 1984) was an American folk music singer-songwriter from Chicago. He wrote the song “City of New Orleans,” which was recorded by Arlo Guthrie and many others including John Denver, The Highwaymen, and Judy Collins; in 1985, it received a Grammy award for best country song, as performed by Willie Nelson. Goodman had a small but dedicated group of fans for his albums and concerts during his lifetime, and is generally considered a musician’s musician. His most frequently sung song is the Chicago Cubs anthem, “Go Cubs Go”. Goodman died of leukemia in September 1984.

Born on Chicago’s North Side to a middle-class Jewish family, Goodman began writing and performing songs as a teenager, after his family had moved to the near north suburbs. He graduated from Maine East High School in Park Ridge, Illinois, in 1965, where he was a classmate of Hillary Clinton. Before that, however, he began his public singing career by leading the junior choir at Temple Beth Israel in Albany Park. In the fall of 1965, he entered the University of Illinois and pledged the Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity, where he, Ron Banyon, and Steve Hartmann formed a popular rock cover band, “The Juicy Fruits”. He left college after one year to pursue his musical career. In the early spring of 1967, Goodman went to New York, staying for a month in a Greenwich Village brownstone across the street from the Cafe Wha?, where Goodman performed regularly during his brief stay there. Returning to Chicago, he intended to restart his education but he dropped out again to pursue his musical dream full-time after discovering the cause of his continuous fatigue was actually leukemia, the disease that was present during the entirety of his recording career, until his death in 1984. In 1968 Goodman began performing at the Earl of Old Town and The Dangling Conversation coffeehouse in Chicago and attracted a following.

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By 1969, Goodman was a regular performer in Chicago, while attending Lake Forest College. During this time Goodman supported himself by singing advertising jingles.

In September 1969 he met Nancy Pruter (sister of R&B writer Robert Pruter), who was attending college while supporting herself as a waitress. They were married in February 1970. Though he experienced periods of remission, Goodman never felt that he was living on anything other than borrowed time, and some critics, listeners and friends have said that his music reflects this sentiment. His wife Nancy, writing in the liner notes to the posthumous collection No Big Surprise, characterized him this way:

Basically, Steve was exactly who he appeared to be: an ambitious, well-adjusted man from a loving, middle-class Jewish home in the Chicago suburbs, whose life and talent were directed by the physical pain and time constraints of a fatal disease which he kept at bay, at times, seemingly by willpower alone . . . Steve wanted to live as normal a life as possible, only he had to live it as fast as he could . . . He extracted meaning from the mundane.

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Goodman’s songs first appeared on Gathering at The Earl of Old Town, an album produced by Chicago record company Dunwich in 1971. As a close friend of Earl Pionke, the owner of the folk music bar, Goodman performed at The Earl dozens of times, including customary New Year’s Eve concerts. He also remained closely involved with Chicago’s Old Town School of Folk Music, where he had met and mentored his good friend, John Prine.

Later in 1971, Goodman was playing at a Chicago bar called the Quiet Knight as the opening act for Kris Kristofferson. Impressed with Goodman, Kristofferson introduced him to Paul Anka, who brought Goodman to New York to record some demos.[3] These resulted in Goodman signing a contract with Buddah Records.

All this time, Goodman had been busy writing many of his most enduring songs, and this avid songwriting would lead to an important break for him. While at the Quiet Knight, Goodman saw Arlo Guthrie and asked him to sit and let him play a song for him. Guthrie grudgingly agreed on the condition that Goodman buy him a beer first; Guthrie would then listen to Goodman for as long as it took Guthrie to drink the beer.[3] Goodman played “City of New Orleans”, which Guthrie liked enough that he asked to record it.

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Guthrie’s version of Goodman’s song became a Top-20 hit in 1972 and provided Goodman with enough financial and artistic success to make his music a full-time career. The song, about the Illinois Central’s City of New Orleans train, would become an American standard, covered by such musicians as Johnny Cash, Judy Collins, Chet Atkins, Lynn Anderson, and Willie Nelson, whose recorded version earned Goodman a posthumous Grammy Award for Best Country Song in 1985. A French translation of the song, “Salut Les Amoureux”, was recorded by Joe Dassin in 1973. A Dutch singer, Gerard Cox, heard the French version while on holiday and translated it into Dutch, titled “‘t Is Weer Voorbij Die Mooie Zomer” (“And again that beautiful summer has come to an end”). It reached number one on the Dutch Top 40 in December 1973 and has become a classic which is still played on Dutch radio. A Hebrew version of the song “Shalom Lach Eretz Nehederet” was sung by famous Israeli singer Yehoram Gaon in 1977 and became an immediate hit. Lyrically, the French, Dutch and Hebrew versions bear no resemblance to Goodman’s original lyrics. According to Goodman, the song was inspired by a train trip he and his wife took from Chicago to Mattoon, Illinois.[4] According to the liner notes on the Steve Goodman anthology No Big Surprise, “City of New Orleans” was written while on the campaign trail with Senator Edmund Muskie.

In 1974, singer David Allan Coe achieved considerable success on the country charts with Goodman’s and John Prine’s “You Never Even Called Me by My Name”, a song which good-naturedly spoofed stereotypical country music lyrics. Prine refused to take a songwriter’s credit for the song, although Goodman bought Prine a jukebox as a gift from his publishing royalties. Goodman’s name is mentioned in Coe’s recording of the song, in a spoken epilogue in which Goodman and Coe discuss the merits of “the perfect country and western song.”

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Goodman’s success as a recording artist was more limited. Although he was known in folk circles as an excellent and influential songwriter,[3] his albums received more critical than commercial success. One of Goodman’s biggest hits was a song he didn’t write: “The Dutchman”, written by Michael Peter Smith. He reached a wider audience as the opening act for Steve Martin while Martin was at the height of his stand-up popularity.

During the mid and late seventies, Goodman became a regular guest on Easter Day on Vin Scelsa’s radio show in New York City. Scelsa’s personal recordings of these sessions eventually led to an album of selections from these appearances, The Easter Tapes.

In 1977, Goodman performed on Tom Paxton’s live album New Songs From the Briarpatch (Vanguard Records), which contained some of Paxton’s topical songs of the 1970s, including “Talking Watergate” and “White Bones of Allende”, as well as a song dedicated to Mississippi John Hurt entitled “Did You Hear John Hurt?”

During the fall of 1979, Goodman was hired to write and perform a series of topical songs for National Public Radio. Although Goodman and Jethro Burns recorded eleven songs for the series, only five of them, “The Ballad of Flight 191” about a plane crash, “Daley’s Gone”, “Unemployed”, “The Twentieth Century is Almost Over”, and “The Election Year Rag”, were used on the air before the series was cancelled.

Hoyt Axton, Odetta, Tom Paxton and Steve Goodman backstage at The Greek Theatre in 1981 in Berkeley, California:
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Goodman wrote and performed many humorous songs about Chicago, including three about the Chicago Cubs: “A Dying Cub Fan’s Last Request”, “When the Cubs Go Marching In” and “Go, Cubs, Go” (which has frequently been played on Cubs broadcasts and at Wrigley Field after Cubs wins). He wrote “Go, Cubs, Go” out of spite after then GM Dallas Green called “A Dying Cub Fan’s Last Request” too depressing. The Cubs songs grew out of his fanatical devotion to the team, which included many clubhouse and on-field visits with Cubs players. He wrote other songs about Chicago, including “The Lincoln Park Pirates”, about the notorious Lincoln Towing Service, and “Daley’s Gone”, about Mayor Richard J. Daley. Another comic highlight is “Vegematic”, about a man who falls asleep while watching late-night TV and dreams he ordered many products that he saw on infomercials. He could also write serious songs, most notably “My Old Man”, a tribute to Goodman’s father, Bud Goodman, a used-car salesman and World War II veteran.

Goodman won his second Grammy, for Best Contemporary Folk Album, in 1988 for Unfinished Business, a posthumous album on his Red Pajamas Records label.

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Many fans become aware of Goodman’s work through other artists such as Jimmy Buffett. Buffett has recorded several of Goodman’s songs, including “Banana Republics”, “Door Number Three” and “Woman Goin’ Crazy on Caroline Street”.[7] Jackie DeShannon covered Goodman’s “Would You Like to Learn to Dance” on her 1972 album, Jackie.
Death

On September 20, 1984, Goodman died of leukemia at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle, Washington. He had anointed himself with the tongue-in-cheek nickname “Cool Hand Leuk” (other nicknames included “Chicago Shorty” and “The Little Prince”) during his illness. He was 36 years old.

Four days after Goodman’s death, the Chicago Cubs clinched the Eastern Division title in the National League for the first time ever, earning them their first post-season appearance since 1945, three years before Goodman’s birth. Eight days later, on October 2, the Cubs played their first post-season game since Game 7 of the 1945 World Series. Goodman had been asked to sing “The Star-Spangled Banner” before it; Jimmy Buffett filled in, and dedicated the song to Goodman. Since the late 2000s, at the conclusion of every home game, the Cubs play (and fans sing) “Go, Cubs, Go”, a song Goodman wrote for his beloved team.

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In April 1988, some of Goodman’s ashes were scattered at Wrigley Field, the home of the Chicago Cubs. He was survived by his wife and three daughters. His eldest daughter, Jesse, died in 2012.

In 2006, Goodman’s daughter, Rosanna, issued My Old Man, an album of a variety of artists covering her father’s songs.

Interest in Goodman’s career had a resurgence in 2007 with the publication of a biography by Clay Eals, Steve Goodman: Facing the Music. The same year, the Chicago Cubs began playing Goodman’s 1984 song “Go, Cubs, Go” after each home game win. When the Cubs made it to the playoffs, interest in the song and Goodman resulted in several newspaper articles about Goodman. Illinois Lieutenant Governor Pat Quinn declared October 5, 2007, Steve Goodman Day in the state. In 2010, Illinois Representative Mike Quigley introduced a bill renaming the Lakeview post office on Irving Park Road in honor of Goodman. The bill was signed by President Barack Obama on August 3, 2010 (by wikipedia)

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And here´s his 5th solo-album:

A typical Steve Goodman mix of eclectic stylings and clever wordplay, Words We Can Dance To roams far and wide. The music ranges from a cover of the rock & roll classic “Tossin’ and Turnin'” to the Western swing of “Between the Lines,” and from the country shuffle of “Death of a Salesman” to the solo acoustic blues guitar pickin’ on the standard “The Glory of Love.” Within this broad musical spectrum, Goodman delivers his original lyrics, both humorous and heartfelt. “Banana Republics” became a staple of Jimmy Buffett’s repertoire after its inclusion on Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes. In “Old Fashioned,” Goodman tells of being “out of date and born too late” as he seeks the love of an “old fashioned girl,” but in fact the lines probably described his music as well. Both “Between the Lines” and “That’s What Friends Are For” offer compelling, personal looks at the elusiveness of love, while on “Death of a Salesman” Goodman goes for the laughs in a retelling of the old traveling salesman story. (by Jim Newsom)

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Personnel:
Saul Broudy (harmonica)
Steve Burgh (guitar)
Jethro Burns )mandolin)
Peter Ecklund (clarinet, cornet)
Johnny Frigo (bass, violin)
Ruth Goodman (violin)
Steve Goodman (vocals, guitar)
Jeff Gutcheon (clavinet, keyboards)
Harold Klatz (viola)
Kenny Kosek (fiddle)
Lew London (dobro, mandolin)
Hugh McDonald (bass)
Steve Mosley (drums, tambourine)
Tom Radtke (drums, timbales)
Bobby Rossi (accordion)
Jim Rothermel (arp strings, recorder, saxophone)
Sid Sims (bass)
Winnie Winston (banjo, pedal steel-guitar)
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background vocals:
Mark Gaffney – Mary Gaffney – Bill Swofford – Raun MacKinnon – Diane Holmes – Jim Post

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Tracklist:
01. Roving Cowboy (Smith) 4.39
02. Tossin’ and Turnin’ (Adams/Rene) 3.24
03. Unemployed (Goodman) 2.27
04. Between The Lines (Burgh/Goodman) 3.27
05. Old Fashioned (Ballan/Burgh/Chamberlain/Goodman) 3.07
06. Can’t Go Back (Burgh/Goodman) 3.26
07. Banana Republics (Burgh/Goodman/Rothermel) 3.49
08. Death Of A Salesman (Broudy/Burgh/Goodman/Gutcheon/London/Rothermel) 2.53
09. That’s What Friends Are For (Burgh/Goodman/Gutcheon/Rothermel) 4.18
10. The Glory Of Love (Hill) 2.07

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When I got up this morning I walked down to the plant
I wanted to go to work but they said you can’t
And when I asked the boss why I got canned
He said somethin’ ’bout the laws of supply and demand
Well that’s the kind of thing
That gets a man annoyed
When the wolf is knocking
And you’re unemployed

And I filled out those forms they had in personnel
There’s twenty men applying for every job to fill
Some boys in line are just bums like me
And some of them got sheepskins and PhD’s
It’s a sorry situation that you can’t avoid
When you’re over educated and unemployed

I don’t want to be told how long I have to wait
And I don’t want to be no number in no jobless rate
Don’t want no welfare from no welfare state
I just want to put the groceries on my baby’s plate

When I die then I’ll get my just reward
When the devil makes me chairman of the board
Whenever they had hard times in this land before
Then they said the way you stop it is to start a war
Well I don’t want to hear none of that from no politicians no more
Or next election day they’ll be unemployed

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Steven Benjamin Goodman (July 25, 1948 – September 20, 1984)

Stills & Collins – Everybody Knows (2017)

FrontCover1Everybody Knows is an album by Stephen Stills and Judy Collins, credited to “Stills & Collins”. It marks the first collaboration between the former lovers and longtime friends. It was financed through a crowdfunding campaign on PledgeMusic.

From 1968 to 1969, Stills and Collins were romantically involved. Stills wrote several songs about Judy, most notably “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes” and “Judy”. But despite Stills playing on several of Collins’ recordings, they never recorded as a duo or performed on stage together.[2] Stills said that he and Collins “…talked over the years and muddled through conversations about if we did make a record together…”, ultimately releasing Everybody Knows and going on tour. (by wikipedia)

50 years ago, singer-songwriter Stephen Stills met singer-songwriter Judy Collins, known for her piercing ocean blue eyes. Their tumultuous love affair would later be immortalized by Stills with his composition “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes,” performed by Crosby, Stills & Nash on their landmark debut. Both artists would go gone to shape modern music with visionary approaches, but Stills and Collins’ short fiery union remains a transformative era for the two artists.

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This summer, the two icons of folk will celebrate the golden anniversary of their formative time together. Their joint summer tour marks the first time ever Stills and Collins have been onstage together. For this once in a lifetime experience, the two music legends will pull from their rich catalogs, debut songs from their upcoming album, due out Summer of 2017, and share warm and intimate stories from their journeys and the1960s folk and Laurel Canyon scenes they helped build.

Stills and Collins met in 1967 and dated for two years. Stills wrote and demoed his legendary love song to Collins right after he left Buffalo Springfield, before he joined CSN. “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes” is a five-section romantic epic brimming with heartfelt sincerity. The song has been ranked #418 in Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time Poll.

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​                                                                                                                                                                     Stills is known for his work with Buffalo Springfield, Crosby, Stills & Nash, and his solo work. In addition to “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes,” Stills is best known for the hits “ For What It’s Worth” by Buffalo Springfield and “Love The One You’re With” from his solo debut, Stephen Stills. He’s a multi-instrumentalist, composer, and ranked #28 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s “The 100 Greatest Guitarists Of All Time.” He also has the added distinction of being the first artist to be inducted into the Rock N’ Roll Hall of Fame twice in one night (for his work with CSN and Buffalo Springfield). He recently released a sophomore album with The Rides, the blues-rock supergroup he formed in 2013 with Kenny Wayne Shepherd and Barry Goldberg, and is currently putting the finishing touches on his long-awaited, much-anticipated autobiography.

BIG SUR FOLK FESTIVAL, 1968

‘Stills & Collins’ will be released on the heels of a very busy period for Collins, who released an album in 2015 and 2016. 2015’s ‘Strangers Again’ earned Judy her highest Billboard 200 debut in almost 30 years, and 2016’s ‘Silver Skies Blue’ duets album with Ari Hest earned a GRAMMY nomination for Best Folk Album. She’s recently been described by the NY Times as the “ageless wild angel of pop,” appeared in HBO’s Girls, and released the book ‘Cravings: How I Conquered Food’ earlier this year. (press release)

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Judy Collins provided Stephen Stills with the inspiration for “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes,” a song he composed in 1969 as their relationship was coming to an end. Lovers no more, the two remained friends over the years and decided to strike up a musical partnership nearly 50 years later, releasing Everybody Knows in September of 2017. The album deliberately plays off their past, with the duo reviving songs from their individual albums — “Who Knows Where the Time Goes” from Collins; “So Begins the Task” from Stills — and selecting covers from their peers, including the Traveling Wilburys’ “Handle with Care,” Tim Hardin’s “Reason to Believe,” Bob Dylan’s “Girl from the North Country,” and Leonard Cohen’s “Everybody Knows,” which also lends its name to the album title. It’s a clean and crisp production, so much so that its transparency reveals the disparity between Collins’ sweet voice and Stills’ scraggly singing, a pairing that can sound as smooth as sandpaper. Nevertheless, there’s an inherent warmth to Everybody Knows. Stills and Collins have a gentle, easy chemistry and the studio-slick supporting performances provide a nice bed for a project that is less nostalgia than a reassuring reminder of the comfort of growing old together. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Tony Beard (drums)
Judy Collins (vocals, guitar)
Kevin McCormick (bass)
Stephen Stills (vocals, guitar)
Russell Walden (keyboards)
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Marvin Etzioni (mandolin, mandocello on 05.)

Tracklist:
01. Handle With Care (Dylan/Lynne/Petty/Harrison/Orbison) 3.43
02. So Begins The Task (Stills) 3.36
03. River Of Gold (Collins) 3.37
04. Judy (Stills) 4.03
05. Everybody Knows (Cohen/Robinson) 5.27
06. Houses (Collins) 4.37
07. Reason To Believe (Hardin) 2.57
08. Girl From The North Country (Dylan) 3.26
09. Who Knows Where The Time Goes (Denny) 5.41
10. Questions (Stills) 3.45

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website

 

Tim Rose – Haunted (1997)

FrontCover1A nearly forgotten singer/songwriter of the ’60s, Tim Rose’s early work bore a strong resemblance to another Tim working in Greenwich Village around 1966-1967 — Tim Hardin. Rose also favored a throaty blues folk-rock style with pop production flourishes, though he looked to outside material more, wasn’t quite in Hardin’s league as a singer or songwriter, and had a much harsher, even gravelly vocal tone. Before beginning a solo career, Rose had sung with Cass Elliott in the folk trio the Big Three a few years before she joined the Mamas and the Papas. Signed by Columbia in 1966, his 1967 debut album (which actually included a few previously released singles) is considered by far his most significant work. Two of the tracks were particularly noteworthy: his slow arrangement of “Hey Joe” inspired Jimi Hendrix’s version and “Morning Dew,” Rose’s best original composition, became something of a standard, covered by the Jeff Beck Group, the Grateful Dead, Clannad, and others. Years later, though, it was debated as to whether Rose wrote the song, or whether folksinger Bonnie Dobson penned the original version. Some non-LP singles he recorded around this time have unfortunately never been reissued, and although he made several other albums up through the mid-’70s, none matched the acclaim of the first one. An influence on Nick Cave and others, Rose died on September 24, 2002. A posthumous album called Snowed In, which contains material Rose was working on in the last year of his life, was released in 2003 by Cherry Red Records. (by Richie Unterberger)

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This is a part-studio, part-live album. The live tracks were recorded at The Garage and the Royal Albert Hall, London (where Tim was appearing on the bill with Nick Cave) in 1997

Excellent studio versions of new songs and outstanding live performances of his classic songs,
“Morning Dew”, “Hey Joe”, and “Come Away, Melinda”. His best album since his debut album on Columbia Records. To this day, I prefer his versions of “Hey Joe” and “Morning Dew” from his first album and this wonderful semi-live album! (Gary Cornelius)

After Tim Rose released his classic debut album in 1967, and several not-so-good records in the following years, he almost disappeared in the late seventies. His 1977 album The Gambler was left unreleased untill 1991. Throughout the eighties he worked as a construction laborer, recorded TV jingles, studied history at college, became a stockbroker on Wall Street and struggled with alcoholism.

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Things started picking up for him in the nineties, though. His big fan Nick Cave lobbied him, did some guest appearances at concerts, and let Rose open up for him at the Royal Albert Hall in May ’97. Six songs from that performance are featured here on this album.

According to some online biographies, Cave produced the studio tracks presented here, though the CD only lists Rose himself as producer (except “Natural Thing”; co-produced by one Trevor Cummins). I can’t imagine that Cave had anything to do with these studio tracks; his good taste would surely have opposed the cheesy production with programmed drums and similar atrocities.

The eight live tracks are preferable. They feature Rose solo with acoustic guitar (on two tracks accompanied by Michael Winn on electric guitar). He’s in good voice, and does fine versions of his three most famous songs; “(Hey Joe) Cold Steel ’44”, “I Ain’t Had No Lovin'” (a. k. a. “Long Time Man”) and “Morning Dew”, sounding like an old blues man.

Too bad they didn’t go for an all-live album, or got a better producer and band for the studio sessions. (by Einar Stenseng)

And I include many entries in the condolence book, published shortly after his death.

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Personnel:
Tim Rose (vocals, guitar)
Alan Seidler (piano)
Pierre Tubbs (keyboards)
Mickey Wynne (guitar)
+
Darius Ditullio, David Zinno, Eric Sample, Shawn Bight, B.Wilson, David Clarke

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Tracklist:
01. (Hey Joe) Blu Steel ’44 (Roberts) 5.12
02. Give Your Lovin To The Livin’ (Rose) 3.35
03. He Never Was A Hero (Rose/Ditullio) 3.12
04. Natural Thing (Cummins) 4.26
05. A Mite Confused (Rose) 4.41
06. I Ain’t Had No Lovin’ (Rose) 4.02
07. Because You’re Rich (Ditullio/Rose) 3.37
08. The Dealer (Rose) 5.19
09. Come Away, Melinda (Minkoff/Hellerman) 4.40
10. Haunted (Rose) 3.39
11. Four Dancing Queens Rose/Gold) 3.19
12. Hanging Tree (Rose/Gold) 4.22
13. I Sold It With My Car ((Goin’ Down In Hollywood) (Rose) 6.50
14. Morning Dew (Dobson/Rose) 6.09

All live tracks: Royal Albert Hall, London, 1997

CD

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TimRose02
Timothy Alan Patrick Rose (September 23, 1940 – September 24, 2002)