Joan Baez with The Grateful Dead – Unreleased Studio Album (1981)

FrontCover1And here´s another fine rarity in this crazy, little blog:

A Joan Baez studio album with the Grateful Dead backing her, was recorded in late 1981, but never released !

And I never knew this existed.

Joan Baez was dating Mickey when this happened, which is a major reason why it was created.

And we can hear some real fine compositions of Joan Baez.

Her version of “Children Of The 80s” is much better than the one that was recorded later. And “Warriors Of The Sun”is another highlight … a perfect mix between the music of Joan Baez and Grateful Dead.

And her version of the Traditional “Jack-A-Roe” really fantastic  ..

And her “Happy Birthday, Leonid Brezhnev” was another example, that she was a very political person:

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So … Listen and enjoy this rarity.

Alternate front+backcover:

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I guess this album was put together from different sources. because the sound differs from track to track.

Thanks to everyone who made these tracks available. And I add some more lyrics from this really interesting album.

Recorded at the Barn, Novato, CA 1980

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Personnel:
Joan Baez (guitar, vocals)
Jerry Garcia (guitar)
Mickey Hart (drums)
Jim McPherson (keyboards, drums)
Bob Weir (guitar)
Bobby Vega (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. (For The) Children Of The Eighties 5.41
02. Don’t Blame My Mother 4.02
03. Marriott, USA 5.47
04. Happy Birthday, Leonid Brezhnev 4.43
05. Lady Di And I 5.14
06. Lucifer’s Eyes 4.10
07. Warriors Of The Sun 8.38
08. Jack-A-Roe 4.00

All song written by Joan Baez,
except 08, which is a Traditional

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John Martyn – Solid Air (1973)

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Iain David McGeachy OBE (11 September 1948 – 29 January 2009), known professionally as John Martyn, was a British singer-songwriter and guitarist. Over a 40-year career, he released 22 studio albums, and received frequent critical acclaim. The Times described him as “an electrifying guitarist and singer whose music blurred the boundaries between folk, jazz, rock and blues”.

Martyn began his career at age 17 as a key member of the British folk music scene, drawing inspiration from American blues and English traditional music, and signed with Island Records. By the 1970s he had begun incorporating jazz and rock into his sound on albums such as Solid Air (1973) and One World (1977), as well as experimenting with guitar effects and tape delay machines such as Echoplex. He struggled with substance abuse and domestic problems throughout the 1970s and 1980s, though continued to release albums while collaborating with figures such as Phil Collins and Lee “Scratch” Perry. He remained active until his death in 2009.

Solid Air is the fourth studio album by British folk singer-songwriter John Martyn, released in February 1973 by Island Records.

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The album was recorded over eight days and features instrumental contributions by bassist Danny Thompson and members of Fairport Convention. “Solid Air”, the title track, was dedicated to a friend of Martyn’s, Nick Drake, who would die of an antidepressant overdose 18 months after the album was released. Martyn said of the track “It was done for a friend of mine, and it was done right with very clear motives, and I’m very pleased with it, for varying reasons. It has got a very simple message, but you’ll have to work that one out for yourself.” The album features an avant-garde cover of Skip James’ “Devil Got My Woman,” here retitled “I’d Rather Be the Devil” and performed with heavy use of Martyn’s Echoplex tape delay effect.

“May You Never” became something of a signature song for Martyn, becoming a staple of his live performances. Released in November 1971 as a single in an early form, the song JohnMartyn02was re-recorded during the Solid Air sessions.[8] Eric Clapton covered “May You Never” on his 1977 album Slowhand. When Martyn was presented with a lifetime achievement award by Phil Collins (a collaborator of Martyn’s) at the 2008 BBC Folk Awards, In 2006, Martyn performed the album live in its entirety as part of the All Tomorrow’s Parties-curated Don’t Look Back series and subsequently toured the UK.

A remastered CD was issued by Universal Records in October 2000. This CD was packaged in a card slipcase, and featured a remastered version of the original album with the addition of a live version of “I’d Rather Be The Devil”. Solid Air was given a further remastering and repackaging when a double CD reissue curated by John Hillarby was released in 2009, and which included several alternate studio and live versions.

The album cover is an example of schlieren photography demonstrating the ‘solid’ nature of air.

Solid Air was rated as the 67th Greatest British Album Ever by the British music magazine Q, and was also included in their list of Best Chill-Out Albums Of All Time. The album is included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die by Robert Dimery. It was voted number 826 in Colin Larkin’s All Time Top 1000 Albums 3rd Edition (2000).  (by wikipedia)

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Solid Air is one of the defining moments in British folk, in the same league as Fairport Convention’s Liege & Lief, Richard & Linda Thompson’s Shoot Out the Lights, and Michael Chapman’s Rainmaker. Martyn stepped out of his comfort zone to record and produce it, including not only jazz and blues but rock and plenty of sound effects, and featuring Rhodes piano on some of its tracks, dismaying some fans while winning a ton more for its genre-blurring presentation. A number of its cuts — such as the title track (written for Martyn’s friend, Nick Drake), “Over the Hill,” “I’d Rather Be the Devil,” and “May You Never” — remained staples in his live sets until the end of his life. (by by Thom Jurek)

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Personnel:
Neemoi “Speedy” Acquaye (percussion)
John “Rabbit” Bundrick (keyboards, clavinet)
John Martyn (guitar, vocals, keyboards on 09.)
Dave Mattacks (drums)
Dave Pegg (bass)
Danny Thompson (bass)
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Tristan Fry (vibraphone on 01.)
Tony Coe (saxophone on 01. + 06.)
Sue Draheim (violin on 02.)
Simon Nicol (autoharp on 02.)
Richard Thompson (mandolin on 02.)

Booklet
Tracklist:
01. Solid Air (Martyn) 5.47
02. Over The Hill (Martyn) 2.51
03. Don’t Want To Know (Martyn) 3.02
04. I’d Rather Be The Devil (James) 6.19
05. Go Down Easy (Martyn) 3.36
06. Dreams By The Sea (Martyn) 3.18
07. May You Never (Martyn) 3.43
08. The Man In The Station (Martyn) 2.55
09. The Easy Blues (Martyn) 3.22

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JohnMartyn03John Martyn (11 September 1948 – 29 January 2009)

 

Neil Young & Crazy Horse – Live Rust (1979)

FrontCover1Live Rust is a live album by Neil Young and Crazy Horse, recorded during their fall 1978 Rust Never Sleeps tour.

Live Rust composed of performances recorded at several venues, including the Cow Palace near San Francisco. Young also directed a companion film, Rust Never Sleeps, under a pseudonym “Bernard Shakey”, which consisted of footage from the Cow Palace.

The CD version of the album was slightly edited so as to fit on a single compact disc, which were limited to 74 minutes at the time this album was first issued on CD. In 2014, a remastered, high-resolution download was made available on the Pono store, restoring the album to its original length.

Between tracks 2 & 3 on side 2 there is a stage announcment calling for people to get off of a tower and comments on an ongoing rainstorm. This is actually taken from Woodstock, almost a decade prior where Young performed as a member of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. (by wikipedia)

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All the kudos Neil Young earned for Rust Never Sleeps he lost for Live Rust, the double-LP live album released four months later. Live Rust was the soundtrack to Young’s concert film Rust Never Sleeps (he had wanted to give it that title, but Reprise vetoed the idea, fearing confusion with the earlier album), and likewise was recorded October 22, 1978, at the Cow Palace in San Francisco. But much of the Rust Never Sleeps album had been recorded on the same tour, and Live Rust repeated four songs from that disc; besides, since Young had released the career retrospective Decade in 1977, critics felt he was unfairly recycling his older material and repeating his new material.

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In retrospect, however, Live Rust, now a single 74-minute CD, comes off as an excellent Neil Young live album and career summary, starting with the early song “Sugar Mountain” and running through then-new songs like “My My, Hey Hey (Out of the Blue)” and “Powderfinger.” Young is effective in both his acoustic folksinger and hard-rocking Crazy Horse bandleader modes. The various distractions of the concert itself and the film, such as the pretentious props and cowled roadies, are absent, and what’s left is a terrific Neil Young concert recording. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Ralph Molina (drums, vocals)
Frank Sampedro (guitar, keyboards, vocals)
Billy Talbot (bass, vocals)
Neil Young (guitar, vocals, harmonica, piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Sugar Mountain 5.04
02. I Am A Child 3.01
03. Comes A Time 3.16
04. After The Gold Rush 4.01
05. My My, Hey Hey (Out Of The Blue) 4.06
06. When You Dance I Can Really Love 3.52
07. The Loner 5.34
08. The Needle And The Damage Done 2.27
09. Lotta Love 2.56
10. Sedan Delivery 4.58
11. Powderfinger 5.51
12. Cortez The Killer 7.29
13. Cinnamon Girl 3.28
14. Like A Hurricane 7.51
15. Hey Hey, My My (Into The Black) 4.37
16. Tonight’s The Night 7.19

All songs written b Neil Young
except 05. + 15. which was written bei Neil Young & Jeff Blackburn

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More Neil Young:

More

John Renton – Half In Half Out (1975)

FrontCover1John Renton was a singer and multi-instrumentalist (guitar, keyboards, harmonica, etc.). Born in India, lived for a shirt time in England and then moved to Vancouver, Canada where he first worked as session musician in the 1960s.

During the Sixties he played in locals bands like
The Raja and Three To One before he tried to start a shortlived solo career.

And this album is a pretty good one … a great mixture between Folk-Rock with some Psych elements (“Picture Tree”, “Monday Morning”).

Unfortunately I gave no idea what was happened with John Renton after recording this beautiful album.

A forgotten treasure ot the Seventies (including a great cover) !

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This first and last solo album of this Canadian musician, released by the label “Reprise Records”, was not reprinted on the CD …

So you hear another vinyl rip by myself.

And … Hey … Mr. John Renton … where are you now ?

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Personnel:
Paul Beedham (drums)
Susie Campbell (background vocals)
Hagood Hardy (vibraphone, marimba)
John Hartford (banjo, fiddle)
Jerry Lester  (bass)
John Renton (guitar, vocals, harmonica percussion)
Pat Riccio (keyboards)
Lance Saegusa (guitar)
Don Thompson (flute, reeds)

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Frontcover of the test pressing

Tracklist:
01. In The Middle (Renton/Bay) 2.27
02. When I Talk (Renton) 3.07
03. Monday Morning (Renton/Bay) 2.45
04. City Walking Blues (Renton/Bay) 3.22
05. You Know (Renton/Beckwith) 2.16
06. Half In, Half Out (Renton/Bay) 4,01
07. Darkness And Light (Renton/Bay) 3.45
08. Picture Tree (Renton/Bay) 4.46
09. Down Parade (Renton/Bay) 3.57

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InletsThe inlets

TestpressingLabelA+BTestpressing Labels A + B

The Leaves – Hey Joe (1966)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Leaves were an American garage rock band formed in San Fernando Valley, California, United States, in 1964. They are best known for their version of the song “Hey Joe”, which was a hit in 1966. Theirs is the earliest release of this song, which became a rock standard.

The band was founded by bass player Jim Pons and guitarist Robert Lee Reiner, who were inspired by hearing The Beatles while students at Cal State Northridge in Los Angeles. Originally called The Rockwells, they were fraternity brothers who formed a group and then taught themselves how to play. Besides Pons and Reiner, the original line-up included John Beck (vocals), Bill Rinehart (lead guitar), and Jimmy Kern (drums); in early 1965, Kern was replaced by drummer Tom Ray.

They began by playing surf and dance music at parties. Their first actual show was in the school gym with Captain Beefheart and His Magic Band. In 1965, The Byrds left their residency at Ciro’s on Sunset Strip after making their first hit, and The Leaves (as they were by now known) were chosen to replace them. It was there they were discovered by popular singer and actor Pat Boone, who got them their first record contract, with Mira Records.

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Their first single, “Too Many People”, was a local hit in Los Angeles The Leaves released “Hey Joe” in November 1965, and dissatisfied with the sound, pulled it. They released a second version in early 1966, which flopped. Original guitarist Bill Rinehart left, and The Leaves redid the song again with a fuzztone by new guitarist Bob Arlin. This version of the song became a hit, and debuted on both Billboard and Cash Box on May 21, 1966. It peaked at No. 31 on Billboard and No. 29 on the Canadian RPM Magazine charts, while showing a humbler peak position of No. 43 on Cash Box. The song ran nine weeks on both national charts.

Their debut album Hey Joe followed. It took a run on the Billboard charts for five weeks, beginning on July 30, 1966, peaking at No. 127. The album did not make it onto the Cash Box charts.

Ad.jpgThe band appeared on TV shows – American Bandstand, Shivaree, Shebang – and briefly in a Hollywood film, The Cool Ones (1967). One more album, All the Good That’s Happening, was released before the band broke up in 1967 when Pons left to join the pop group The Turtles; In the early 1970s, Pons played bass with Frank Zappa.[1] Arlin went on to form heavy psychedelic band The Hook[1] and The Robert Savage Group. The band reunited in 1970 before Pons became a member of Zappa’s band. The reunited lineup included Jim Pons on rhythm guitar, John Beck on lead guitar, Buddy Sklar, lead singer from The Hook and The Spencer Davis Group, Al Nichols on bass from the Turtles, and Bob “Bullet” Bailey on drums. The band did some touring and performed at local Los Angeles based nightclubs before disbanding in 1971.

A new generation of music fans discovered the band when their version of “Hey Joe” was included in the classic 1972 garage rock compilation, Nuggets. According to the Nuggets liner notes, the as yet unnamed band was hanging around a tree-shaded pool, smoking, when a newcomer gave the traditional 1960s greeting, “What’s happening?” “The leaves are happening”, came the answer, which struck them all as a good name for a band. (by wikipedia)

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This is one hell of a debut album, especially for a group that only lasted for about a year after its release. The Leaves perform some superb folk-rock in a Byrds/Beatles vein (“Just a Moment,” “Girl From the East”), excellent lyrical garage punk (“Words,” “Tobacco Road”), and solid hard rock (“Hey Joe,” “Too Many People”), and cross swords with the Rolling Stones (“You Better Move On,” “Back On the Avenue” — the latter a ripoff of the Stones’ “2120 South Michigan Avenue”) and Bob Dylan (“Love Minus Zero”).

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The sound isn’t exactly consistent, given the gamut of influences at work here, from Bo Diddley (“Dr. Stone”) to primitive psychedelia (“War of Distortion”), but there isn’t a bad song on the disc, and the CD reissue has about the best sound ever heard on this material, bringing out the guitars in a genuinely crisp and vivid fashion. Maybe the strangest and best track in that regard is their cover of “He Was a Friend of Mine,” which incorporates elements of both the Searchers’ “When You Walk In the Room” and the Byrds’ “I’ll Feel a Whole Lot Better” into its structure and beat — the guitars are a real kick there. The bonus tracks may have come from vinyl sources rather than tape, but they hold up very well for sound quality. Anyone who enjoyed the first two Byrds albums must own this disc. (by Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Bobby Arlin (lead guitar)
John Beck (vocals)
Jim Pons (bass)
Tom “Ambrose” Ray (drums)
Robert Lee Reiner (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Dr.Stone (Pons/Beck) 2.19
02. Just A Memory (Arlin) 2.22
03. Get Out Of My Life Woman (Toussaint) 2.50
04. Girl From The East (Jameson) 3.00
05. He Was A Friend Of Mine (Traditional) 3.24
06. Hey Joe! (Roberts) 2.52
07. Words (Hart/Boyce) 2.24
08. Back On The Avenue (Arlin/Pons/Beck/Reiner/Ray) 3.11
09. War Of Distortion (Arlin) 2.15
10. Tobacco Road (Loudermilk) 2.14
11. Good Bye, My Love (McNally/Pender) 3.09
12. Too Many People (Rinehart/Pons) 3.22
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13. Be With You (Rinehart/Pons) 2.10
14. You Better Move On (Alexander) 2.29
15. That’s A Different Story (Rinehart/Pons) 2.34
16. Love Minus Zero (Dylan) 2.32
17. Funny Little World (Arlin) 2.11

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The Band – Live At The Academy Of Music 1971 (2013)

FrontCover1.jpgThis is my last entry in this year, in this decade … including a New Year´s Eve concert:

During the final week of 1971, The Band played four legendary concerts at New York City’s Academy Of Music, ushering in the New Year with electrifying performances, including new horn arrangements by Allen Toussaint and a surprise guest appearance by Bob Dylan for a New Year’s Eve encore. Select highlights from the concerts were compiled for The Band’s classic 1972 double LP, Rock Of Ages, which peaked at No. 6 on the Billboard 200 and remains a core album in the trailblazing group’s storied Capitol Records catalog.

For the first time, all four of the concerts’ multi-track recordings have been revisited for ‘Live At The Academy Of Music 1971,’ a new 4CD+DVD collection. The expansive new collection features new stereo and 5.1 Surround mixes, including 19 previously unreleased performances and newly discovered footage of two songs filmed by Howard Alk and Murray Lerner. ‘Live At The Academy Of Music 1971’ takes a deep dive into The Band’s historic shows for a definitive document of the pioneering group’s stage prowess at the apex of their career.

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Live At The Academy Of Music 1971 is presented in a deluxe, 48-page hardbound book (not included) with previously unseen photos, a reproduction of Rolling Stone’s original Rock Of Ages review by magazine co-founder Ralph J. Gleason, an essay by The Band’s Robbie Robertson, and appreciations of The Band and the set’s recordings by Mumford & Sons and Jim James of My Morning Jacket. The collection’s first two discs feature performances of every song played over the course of the four concerts, and the New Year’s Eve soundboard mix on discs 3 and 4 puts the listener in the room for that entire legendary night: Uncut, unedited, taken straight from the master recordings and presented in full for the first time. The set’s DVD (not included) presents the tracks from discs 1 and 2 in 5.1 Surround, plus Alk and Lerner’s filmed performances of ‘King Harvest (Has Surely Come)’ and ‘The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show.’

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The Band’s historic performances at New York City’s Academy of Music on Dec. 28-31, 1971 have been collected before, on one of the ’70s’ best live albums, ‘Rock of Ages.’ But the five-disc ‘Live at the Academy of Music 1971’ (which includes a DVD) paints a more complete picture of the shows. The set gathers songs from their four-concert, three-night stand, just as 1971 turned into 1972. The first two CDs compile highlights from the shows, including 29 songs from ‘Up on Cripple Creek’ and ‘I Shall Be Released’ to ‘The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down’ and ‘The Weight’ as well as four from the New Year’s Eve concert where Bob Dylan joined them onstage. The third and fourth discs collect the complete New Year’s Eve concert 27 songs, including the same four with Dylan. Eleven songs in all are repeated from the first two CDs here, which can be both jarring and repetitive as you listen to the exact same performances within different contexts.

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It might all be too much for casual fans, even if 19 of the tracks are previously unreleased. The thrill of Garth Hudson’s massive organ moving from ‘The Genetic Method’ into ‘Auld Lang Syne’ loses some of its power on the New Year’s Eve set when you know it’s coming. Same goes for Dylan’s surprise appearance. Still, the concert-closing version of ‘Like a Rolling Stone’ is almost as ferocious as the one Dylan and the Band played during their 1966 tour of the U.K. The DVD simply adds a visual element to some of the cuts from the album. But the Band find the various shadings in the songs without them. Listen to the way they swing through “Get Up Jake’ and pile their instrumental prowess onto the monumental ‘Chest Fever.’ Or even the way they spin the urbane Motown track ‘Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever’ toward their dusty-road Americana, all spiked by horn arrangements from New Orleans legend Allen Toussaint. That’s the sound of a band at the top of its game. (Promo text)

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Not so much an expansion of 1972’s classic double-live album Rock of Ages, but an exhaustive tribute to its source material, the four-CD/one-DVD 2013 box set Live at the Academy of Music 1971 digs deep into the Band’s year-end four-night stint at New York City’s Academy of Music. The original 18-track sequence for the 1972 LP has been abandoned in favor of a double-concert construct, where the first two discs present one version of each of the 29 songs the Band played over the course of these four nights, while the final two discs present the entirety of the New Years Eve concert that capped off this residency; this CD is remixed from the soundboard tapes, and the DVD replicates this New Years Eve concert (note that there is no footage of the NYE concert, so the music is presented with a selection of stills; nevertheless, there are full clips of the Band performing “King Harvest (Has Surely Come)” and “The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show” on December 30, which are welcome). This structure is an appealing one but invites perhaps more duplications than are necessary.

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The 29 songs on the first two disc contain 11 songs from the New Years Eve show — including the four-song encore with Bob Dylan — but the trade-off is the NYE concert is loaded with unheard versions of familiar songs: 16 of the 27 songs are previously unreleased (in contrast, the only unearthed song on the first two discs is a killer version of “Strawberry Wine”). Perhaps some of these performances are ever so slightly rougher than the accompanying ones on the first two discs, but that liveliness is part of the appeal (besides, this is hardly ragged; as enthusiastic as the Band is, they’re also supplemented by Allen Toussaint’s horn section, so they do need to hit their marks to ensure all the elements fit together). Rock of Ages and, in turn, Live at the Academy of Music 1971 do close out the early years of the Band. They’d tour again, supporting Bob Dylan in 1974, and they turned out a few more records before disbanding in 1976, but they never seemed as triumphant as they did at the end of 1971. Although this box is not perfect — it’s hard not to wish there were no duplications on the first two discs, or the last two — it is nevertheless a mighty testament to the Band at the peak of their powers. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Rick Danko (bass, violin, vocals)
Levon Helm (drums, mandolin, vocals)
Garth Hudson (keyboards, accordion, saxophone)
Richard Manuel (keyboards, drums, vocals)
Robbie Robertson (guitar, vocals)
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Joe Farrell (saxophone, english horn)
Howard Johnson (saxophone, tuba, euphonium)
Earl McIntyre (trombone)
J.D. Parron (saxophone, clarinet)
Snooky Young (trumpet, flugelhorn)
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Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar on CD 2: 13 – 16.; CD 4: 13. – 16.)

Danko Rob

Tracklist:

CD 1: Live At The Academy Of Music (Part 1):
01. The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show (Friday, December 31) (Robertson) 3.50
02. The Shape I’m In (Friday, December 31) (Robertson) 3.49
03. Caledonia Mission (Thursday, December 30) (Robertson) 3.20
04. Don’t Do It (Wednesday, December 29) (Holland/Dozier/Holland) 4.28
05. Stage Fright (Friday, December 31) (Robertson) 4.22
06. I Shall Be Released (Thursday, December 30) (Dylan) 4.01
07. Up On Cripple Creek (Thursday, December 30) (Robertson) 4.40
08. This Wheel’s On Fire (Wednesday, December 29) (Danko/Dylan) 3.48
09. Strawberry Wine (Tuesday, December 28) (Previously Unissued Performance) (Helm/ Robertson) 3.31
10. King Harvest (Has Surely Come) (Friday, December 31) (Robertson) 3.58
11. Time To Kill (Tuesday, December 28) (Robertson) 4.09
12. The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down (Wednesday, December 29) (Robertson) 4.41
13. Across The Great Divide (Thursday, December 30) (Robertson) 3.28

CD 2: Live At The Academy Of Music (Part 2):
01. Life Is A Carnival (Thursday, December 30) (Danko/Helm/Robertson) 4.04
02. Get Up Jake (Thursday, December 30) (Robertson) 3.17
03. Rag Mama Rag (Friday, December 31) (Robertson) 4.04
04. Unfaithful Servant (Friday, December 31) (Robertson) 4.30
05. The Weight (Thursday, December 30) (Robertson) 5.16
06. Rockin’ Chair (Wednesday, December 29) (Robertson) 4.04
07. Smoke Signal (Tuesday, December 28) (Robertson) 5.20
08. The Rumor (Thursday, December 30) (Robertson) 5.04
09. The Genetic Method (Friday, December 31) (Hudson) 7.31
10. Chest Fever (Tuesday, December 28) (Robertson) 5.08
11. (I Don’t Want To) Hang Up My Rock And Roll Shoes (Wednesday, December 29) (Willis) 4.36
12. Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever (Wednesday, December 29) (Hunter/Wonder) 3.31
13. Down In The Flood (with Bob Dylan) (Friday, December 31) (Dylan) 5.11
14. When I Paint My Masterpiece (with Bob Dylan) (Friday, December 31) (Dylan) 4.57
15. Don’t Ya Tell Henry (with Bob Dylan) (Friday, December 31) (Dylan) 3.55
16. Like A Rolling Stone (with Bob Dylan) (Friday, December 31) (Dylan) 5.26

CD 3: New Year´s Eve At The Academy Od Music 1971 (Soundboard Mix) (Part 1):
01. Up On Cripple Creek (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 5.11
02. The Shape I’m In (Robertson) 4.10
03. The Rumor (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 5.06
04. Time To Kill (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 4.23
05. Rockin’ Chair (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 4.10
06. This Wheel’s On Fire (Previously Unissued Performance) (Dank/Dylan) 4.03
07. Get Up Jake (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 3.41
08. Smoke Signal (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 5.31
09. I Shall Be Released (Previously Unissued Performance) (Dylan) 4.01
10. The Weight (Previously Unissued Performance) 5.15
11. Stage Fright (Robertson) 4.32

CD 4: New Year´s Eve At The Academy Od Music 1971 (Soundboard Mix) (Part 2):
01. Life Is A Carnival (Previously Unissued Performance) (Danko/Helm/Robertson) 5.12
02. King Harvest (Has Surely Come) (Robertson) 4.00
03. Caledonia Mission (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 3.29
04. The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show (Robertson) 4.01
05. The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 4.48
06. Across The Great Divide (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 3.52
07. Unfaithful Servant (Robertson) 4.37
08. Don’t Do It (Previously Unissued Performance) (Holland/Dozier/Holland) 4.45
09. The Genetic Method (Hudson) 7.52
10. Chest Fever (Previously Unissued Performance) (Robertson) 6.29
11. Rag Mama Rag (Holland/Dozier/Holland) 4.15
12. (I Don’t Want To) Hang Up My Rock And Roll Shoes (Previously Unissued Performance) (Willis) 4.40
13. Down In The Flood (with Bob Dylan) (Dylan) 5.43
14. When I Paint My Masterpiece (with Bob Dylan) (Dylan) 4.15
15. Don’t Ya Tell Henry (with Bob Dylan) (Dylan) 4.11
16. Like A Rolling Stone (with Bob Dylan) (Dylan) 5.41

CDs

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Rick Danko
(December 29, 1943 – December 10, 1999)

Levon Helm
(May 26, 1940 – April 19, 2012)

Richard Manuel
(April 3, 1943 – March 4, 1986)

Eagles – Learn To Be Still (1994)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Eagles are an American rock band formed in Los Angeles in 1971. The founding members were Glenn Frey (guitars, vocals), Don Henley (drums, vocals), Bernie Leadon (guitars, vocals) and Randy Meisner (bass guitar, vocals). With five number-one singles, six number-one albums, six Grammy Awards, and five American Music Awards, the Eagles were one of the most successful musical acts of the 1970s. Their albums Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and Hotel California rank first and third, respectively, among the best-selling albums in the United States, with 38 million and 26 million album units in sales. The Eagles are one of the world’s best-selling bands, having sold more than 200 million records, including 100 million albums sold in U.S alone. They were ranked number 75 on Rolling Stone’s 2004 list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.

Learn to be Still is a song written by Don Henley and Stan Lynch and recorded by the Eagles. The song is one of four studio tracks on the live album Hell Freezes Over, which was the first album to be released after the band had reunited following a fourteen-year-long break up.

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“Learn to Be Still” was played live during their Hell Freezes Over tour in 1994 and came out as a single in 1995. It peaked at No. 61 on the Billboard Hot 100 Airplay chart in the same year.

And this is a pretty good bootleg (soundboard quality) …. recorded live in the USA, Summer 1994. Limited Edition Picture CD.

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Personnel:
Don Felder (guitar, background vocals)
Glenn Frey (vocals, guitar, keyboards)
Don Henley (vocals, drums, percussion)
Timothy B. Schmidt (vocals, bass)
Joe Walsh (vocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Desperado (Henley/Frey) 3.41
02. Hotel California (Felder/Henley/Frey) 7.01
03. The Heart Of The Matter (Campbell/Souther/Henley) 5.41
04. New York Minute (Henley/Kortchmar/Winding) 6.16
05. Tell Me Why (Henley/Frey) 4.18
06. Tequila Sunrise (Henley/Frey) 3.00
07. Live In The Fast Lane (Walsh/Henley/Frey) 5.10
08. Take It Easy (Browne/Frey) 4.25
09. Wasted Time (Henley/Frey) 5.05
10. Help Me Through The Night (Walsh) 3.55
11. Get Over It (Henley/Frey) 3.28
12. The Last Resort (Henley/Frey) 7.02
13. Love Will Keep Us Alive (Vale/Capaldi/Carrack) 4.98
14. The Girl From Yesterday (Frey/Tempchin) 3.28
15. I Can’t Tell You Why (Schmidt/Henley/Frey) 4.52
16. In The City (Walsh/De Vorzon) 3.55
17. Learn To Be Still (Henley(Lynch) 4.21

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