Marilyn Monroe – The Very Best Of (2000)

FrontCover1.jpgOne of the earliest and most enduring sex symbols of Hollywood, Marilyn Monroe was a talented actress who began a career as a model before foraying into films. The product of a broken home, she did not even know the identity of her biological father. Named as Norma Jeane Mortenson at birth, she spent most of her childhood in foster homes as her mother was mentally unstable and incapable of raising her daughter on her own. The little girl endured a harsh childhood marked by abuse and apathy due to which she suffered from several mental problems later in her life. As a young woman she stared modeling for The Blue Book Modeling Agency and soon became a very successful model thanks to her striking beauty and grace. Eventually she moved on to films, initially appearing in minor roles before bagging more substantial ones. She soon developed an image of a sex symbol by appearing without clothes for the ‘Playboy’ magazine. As an actress she acted in several successful films like ‘The Asphalt Jungle’, ‘The Seven Year Itch’, and ‘The Prince and the Showgirl’. However the final years of her brief life were marked by mental illnesses and alcoholism. Her life was snuffed out untimely when she was just 36 by an overdose of sleeping pills. (thefamouspeople.com)

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Marilyn Monroe, as an actress, I can only stand in small doses. Her movies are excellent, all of them have something worthwhile and redeeming – even the more mundane offerings like ‘Bus Stop’ and ‘Niagra’ are finely-crafted pieces of film – and the more sublime ones like ‘Gentlemen Prefer Blondes’ and ‘Some Like It Hot’ are honest-to-God classic examples of the comic genius of both 1950s Hollywood and Monroe herself.

For all that, however, I can still only watch the pink and fluffy Goddess for short bursts before I long for something that takes itself a little more seriously.

And that’s when I turn to this!

Monroe as a singer I could listen to forever and a day. Worthy of a far higher degree of praise than popular culture has traditionally accorded her, Monroe’s singing is a very rare experience indeed. Her range is impressive, and her style is actually quite thought-provoking – listen to the contrast between the bubblegum-light ‘Down In The Meadow’ and the melancholic, heavy ‘River of no Return’, and you’ll appreciate the fact that, at least as a singer, Monroe was more than capable of shrugging off her Fantasy Gal image for a deeper and more developed means of communication.

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This CD is particularly noteworthy for having all the classics, and also some rarer gems like ‘I’m Gonna File My Claim’ and ‘After You Get What You Want, You Don’t Want It’, both great numbers that are so often omitted from Monroe anthologies and such. Her interpretation of ‘A Fine Romance’ is one of the best ever, and her pairing with the immaculate Jane Russel on ‘Little Girl from Little Rock’ is worth the price of the CD alone.

If you look at all of the most vocally revered female songstresses of this period – Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, Judy Garland – all of them have very fine voices, and an unusual vocal ‘hook’ – Billie’s high acid melancholia, Nina’s deep bass ad-libbing, and Judy’s rolling, emotional high notes – and Monroe is no different.

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Her quivery, quirky soprano is fascinating to listen to, and matches her public personality as well as Ms. Julie Andrews’ voice matches hers. It brings great depth to what would otherwise have been a relatively ordinary voice – but that’s an advantage true of all singers.

One to own and listen to again and again, ‘The Very Best of Marilyn Monroe’ is something anyone with an appreciation of female vocalists will absloutely treasure. (by Review Lover)

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Personnel:
Marilyn Monroe (vocals)
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Jane Russell (vocals on 04., 05. + 08.)
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various orchestras

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Tracklist:
01. Diamonds Are A Girls Best Friend (Styne/(Robin) 3.33
02. Some Like It Hot (Diamond/Berlin/Maineck) 1.20
03. My Heart Belongs To Daddy (Porter/v.Heisen/Cahn) 5.02
04. When Love Goes Wrong (Adamson/Carmichael) 3.29
05. Bye Bye Baby (Kalmar/Adamson/Ruby/Stothart/Carmichael/Styne/Robin) 5.32
06. A Little Girl From Little Rock (D.Daniel/E.Daniel/Styne/Darby/Robin) 3.07
07. River Of No Return (A.Newman/Darby/L.Newman) 2.16
08. I’m Gonna Find My Claim (A.Newman/Darby/L.Newman) 2.39
09. She Acts Like A Woman Should (Delmore/E.Scott/J.Scott) 2.47
10. Kiss (A.Newman/Gillespie/L.Newman) 3.02
11. Lazy (Berlin/Fowler/King) 3.36
12. I Wanna Be Loved By You (Kalmar/Ruby/Stothart/Deutsch) 3.01
13. After You Get What You Want (Berlin) 3.39
14. You’d Be Surprised (Berlin) 3.05
15. Heat Wave (Berlin) 4.24
16. Happy Birthday Mr. President (live) (Traditional) 0.45
17. When I Fall In Love (Heyman/Young) 3.01
18. A Fine Romance (Fields/Kern) 2.22
19. Do It Again (Gershwin/DeSylva) 3.14
20. Down In The Meadow (A.Newman/Darby/L.Newman) 2.30

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Various Artists – The First Recordings of Cretan Music (1940 – 60) (2011)

FrontCover1.jpgBack from Crete …. :

The music of Crete (Greek: Κρητική μουσική), also called kritika (Greek: κρητικά), refers to traditional forms of Greek folk music prevalent on the island of Crete in Greece. Cretan traditional music includes instrumental music (generally also involving singing), a capella songs known as the rizitika, “Erotokritos,” Cretan urban songs (tabachaniotika), as well as other miscellaneous songs and folk genres (lullabies, ritual laments, etc.).

Historically, there have been significant variations in the music across the island (more violin than lyra in far Eastern and Western Crete, a preference for the syrtos in Western Crete and kondylies in Eastern Crete). Some of this variation continues today and in the late-twentieth and early-twenty-first centuries has received greater attention by scholars and the mass media. Nonetheless, over the course of the twentieth-century, the sense of a single, island-wide Cretan musical tradition emerged.

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Although much Cretan music remains consciously close to its folk roots and an integral part of the fabric of many Cretans’ everyday lives, it is also a vibrant and evolving modern, popular tradition that involves many professional and semi-professional musicians, numerous regional record companies and professional distributors, professional luthiers (especially of Cretan lyras and Cretan lutes), and Cretan kentra (clubs for dancing to live Cretan music). (by wikipedia)

And here are some early recordings of this unique sound of Cretan music.

The violin is the prevailling instrument that has been popular in Eastern und Western Crete for years !

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Personnel:
Pantelis Baritantonakis (violin)
Y. Dermitzogiannis (lyre, violin, guitar)
Giorgis Lapokostantakis (violin)
Yannis Papahatzakis (violin, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Kondilies me ti lyra 4.01
02. Ierapetritikos 3.34
03. Varis Haniotikos 3.58
04. Pono krifo i agapi sou 3.04
05. Kondilies me kithara 3.13
06. Haniotika sirta 4.20
07. Pseftiko louloudaki 4.17
08. Ta’mathes Aretousa mou 5.31
09. Makria mou ki an evriskese 2.51
10. Kastrinos horos 4.16
11. Lasithiotika pentozalia 4.01
12. Ithela namoun kladeftis 3.34
13. Rethemniotika sirta 3.41
14. Kondilies Kalogeridi 4.34
15. Irakliotikes kondilies 4.52
16. Pentozalis argos 2.30
17. Tragoudi tou gamou 4.53
18. Lasithiotikes melodies 2.25

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Various Artists – Holy Smoke – Don´t Let Love Fool You (2018)

FrontCover1.jpgHere´s a real great compilation with 28 tracks from the grat R & B Era in the USA and we heart aritsts like Jimmy Shaw, Eddie Moore, Jay Nelson, Sonny Boy Williams, Jimmy Mcphail, Little Johnny Cook or Joe Boots.

“Don’t let love fool you!” Attached to this latest release of predominantly rhythm and blues artists from along-gone era is a message warning of the potential pitfalls that can be associated with that thing known as ‘love’. Without wishing to put any dampeners on any future romance, KoKo Mojo sets out its stall with another twenty-eight tracks that certainly rock and blow away any suggestions of the blues. In fact, what any listener is likely to experience for their listening pleasure via ‘Holy Smoke’ is a collection of tracks culled from history and selected for their addictive qualities when it comes to rhythm, but also their relevance to the subject matter at heart here. Therefore, expect songs that are filled with lovesick sentiments where infatuation can take hold – Baby Clifford King ‘Want To Jump With You’ or Tony Allan’s vocals capturing the mood to perfection during the album’s title track – or unrequited love via the forceful rhythm and blues of ‘Don’t You Want A Man Like Me’ from Jay Nelson.

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There’s a wonderful performance from Juke Boy Barner who delivers what sounds like a ramshackle performance during ‘Rock With Me Baby’, only for closer inspection to reveal that there’s deft hands at work here with far more going on under its bonnet. This, however, is only the beginning as from here on, the variety displayed ups its game further from Prince Royals’ superbly understated and centre of attention, ‘Anna Mae’, to the “great” Eddie Alexander & The Greats ‘I’m In Love’ (complete with accompanying ducks!), before rattling off a whole host of sophisticated rhythm and blues numbers such as ‘My Pretty Baby’ (Ernie Williams), ‘Ding Dong Babe’ (Jimmy McPhail), ‘I’ll Be True To You’ (Billy Fair & Orch.), and Little Johnny Cook with ‘Try Your Love’. There’s too much goodness to be found here, despite any notions of hearts being broken, because ‘Holy Smoke’ offers a passionate and classy taste of rhythm and blues that’s packing enough variety to keep any listener entertained for many hours. Top of its class! (by Nathan Olsen-Haines)

In other words: If you plan your next BBQ-Party, don´t forget to play this album … and you´ll have a real hot and crazy party !

This entry is dedicated to all these unknown heroes of Rhythm & Blues !!!

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Tracklist:
01. Baby Clifford King: Want To Jump With You (King) 3.26
02. Johnny Stewart: A Whole Lot Of Lovin’ (Trimble) 2.04
03. Jimmy Shaw: Take A Chance On Me (Shaw/Harris) 2.22
04. Tony Allan: Holy Smoke Baby (E. Mesner/L. Mesner) 1.32
05. Jay Nelson: Don’t You Want A Man Like Me (Miller/Nelson) 2.02
06. The Jaguars: Ginny Ginny (Johnson/Penniman) 2.28
07. Rufus Gordon: Long Tall Sally (Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell) 2.08
08. Nat The Cool Cat: Come By Here (Andersen) 2.49
09. Juke Boy Barner: Rock With Me (Welson) 2.52
10. Prince Royals: Anna Mae (unknown) 2.42
11. Elmar Parker: You Know I Love You (Parker/Christian) 2.08
12. Eddie Alexander & The Greats: I’m In Love (Jenkins) 2.17
13. Ernie Williams: My Pretty Baby (Gordon/Williams/Web) 1.58
14. Freddie Williams & The Keynotes: Linda Lu (Sharpe) 2.55
15. Piney Brown: Sugar In My Tea (Price/Brown) 2.27
16. Jimmy McPhail: Ding Dong Babe (Harris/Francis) 2.41
17. Billy Fair & Orchestra: I’ll Be True To You (Darge/Weller) 2.20
18. Little Johnny Cook: Try Your Love (Keys/(Woods/Burton) 2.17
19. Leo Price & Band: Hey Now Baby (Price) 2.31
20. Jimmy Trotter: Hungry And Thirsty (Trotter) 1.56
21. Sonny Boy Williams: Alice Mae Blues (Williams) 2.28
22. Lenny Johnson: Walk Ginny Walk (Otis) 2.17
23. Eddie Moore: Touch Of Your Love (Johnson/Moore) 2.15
24. Hayward Lee: My Love (Lee) 2.14
25. Johnny Spain: I’m In Love (Scott/Terry) 2.33
26. Joe Boots: Squeeze Me (Boots) 2.12
27. Modest ‘Show Stopper’ Clifton: Pretty Little Baby (Clifton) 1.55
28. Frank Linkenberg: Ball Of Fire (Butler/Graham) 2.08

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Jack Teagarden – Big T´s Jazz (1956)

FrontCover1.JPGWeldon Leo “Jack” Teagarden (August 20, 1905 – January 15, 1964) was a jazz trombonist and singer. According to critic Scott Yannow of Allmusic, Teagarden was the preeminent American jazz trombone player before the bebop era of the 1940s and “one of the best jazz singers too”.[1] Teagarden’s early career was as a sideman with the likes of Tommy Dorsey, Paul Whiteman and lifelong friend Louis Armstrong before branching out as a bandleader in 1939 and specializing in New Orleans Jazz-style jazz until his death.

Born in Vernon, Texas, his brothers Charlie and Clois “Cub” and his sister Norma also became professional musicians. His father was an amateur brass band trumpeter and started him on baritone horn; by age seven he had switched to trombone. His first public performances were in movie theaters, where he accompanied his mother, a pianist.
Music career
From left: Jack Teagarden, Sandy DeSantis, Velma Middleton, Fraser MacPherson, Cozy Cole, Arvell Shaw, Earl Hines, Barney Bigard, Palomar Supper Club, Vancouver, B.C., Canada (March 17, 1951)
“‘Jack-Armstrong’ Blues” by the V-Disc All Stars, featuring Jack Teagarden and Louis Armstrong, V-Disc, U.S. War Department release, March 1945

JackTeagarden01A.jpgTeagarden’s trombone style was largely self-taught, and he developed many unusual alternative positions and novel special effects on the instrument. He is usually considered the most innovative jazz trombone stylist of the pre-bebop era – Pee Wee Russell once called him “the best trombone player in the world”[3] – and did much to expand the role of the instrument beyond the old tailgate style role of the early New Orleans brass bands. Chief among his contributions to the language of jazz trombonists was his ability to interject the blues or merely a “blue feeling” into virtually any piece of music.[citation needed]

By 1920 Teagarden was playing professionally in San Antonio, including with the band of pianist Peck Kelley. In the mid-1920s he started traveling widely around the United States in a quick succession of different bands. In 1927, he went to New York City where he worked with several bands. By 1928 he played for the Ben Pollack band.

Within a year of the commencement of his recording career, he became a regular vocalist, first doing blues material (“Beale Street Blues”, for example), and later doing popular songs. He is often mentioned as one of the best jazz vocalists of the era;[citation needed] his singing style is like his trombone playing, in much the same way that Louis Armstrong sang like he played trumpet. Teagarden’s singing is best remembered for duets with Armstrong and Johnny Mercer.

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In the late 1920s he recorded with such bandleaders and sidemen as Armstrong, Benny Goodman, Bix Beiderbecke, Red Nichols, Jimmy McPartland, Mezz Mezzrow, Glenn Miller, and Eddie Condon. Miller and Teagarden collaborated to provide lyrics and a verse to Spencer Williams’ Basin Street Blues, which in that amended form became one of the numbers that Teagarden played until the end of his days.

In the early 1930s Teagarden was based in Chicago, for some time playing with the band of Wingy Manone. He played at the Century of Progress exposition in Chicago.

Teagarden sought financial security during the Great Depression and signed an exclusive contract to play for the Paul Whiteman Orchestra from 1933 through 1938. The contract with Whiteman’s band provided him with financial security but prevented him from playing an active part in the musical advances of the mid-thirties swing era (although Teagarden and Frank Trumbauer recorded a number of small group swing classics throughout his tenure with Whiteman on Brunswick).

JackTeagarden03.jpgTeagarden then started leading his own big band. Glenn Miller wrote the song “I Swung the Election” for him and his band in 1939. In spite of Teagarden’s best efforts, the band was not a commercial success, and he was brought to the brink of bankruptcy.

In 1946 Teagarden joined Louis Armstrong’s All Stars. In late 1951 Teagarden left to again lead his own band, then co-led a band with Earl Hines, then again with a group under his own name with whom he toured Japan in 1958 and 1959.

Teagarden appeared in the movies Birth of the Blues (1941), The Strip (1951), The Glass Wall (1953), and Jazz on a Summer’s Day (1960), the latter a documentary film of the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival. He recorded for RCA Victor, Columbia, Decca, Capitol, and MGM Records.

Early in 1964 Teagarden cut short a performance in New Orleans because of ill health. He briefly visited a hospital, then was found dead in his room at the Prince Conti Motel in New Orleans on January 15. The cause of death was bronchial pneumonia, which had followed a liver ailment. He was buried in Los Angeles.

As a jazz artist he won the 1944 Esquire magazine Gold Award, was highly rated in the Metronome polls of 1937-42 and 1945, and was selected for the Playboy magazine All Star Band, 1957-60. Teagarden was the featured performer at the Newport Jazz Festival of 1957.

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In 1969, Jack Teagarden was inducted into the DownBeat Jazz Hall of Fame. He was inducted into the Big Band and Jazz Hall of Fame in 1985. Other honors have included induction in the ASCAP Jazz Wall of Fame in 2005 and inclusion in the Houston Institute for Culture’s Texas Music Hall of Fame.

Jack Teagarden’s compositions include “I’ve Got ‘It'” with David Rose, “Shake Your Hips”, “Big T Jump”, “Swingin’ on the Teagarden Gate”, “Blues After Hours”, “A Jam Session at Victor”, “It’s So Good”, “Pickin’ For Patsy” with Allan Reuss, “Texas Tea Party” with Benny Goodman, “I’m Gonna Stomp Mr. Henry Lee” with Eddie Condon, “Big T Blues”, “Dirty Dog”, “Makin’ Friends” with Jimmy McPartland, “That’s a Serious Thing”, and “‘Jack-Armstrong’ Blues” with Louis Armstrong, recorded on December 7, 1944, with the V-Disc All-Stars and released on V-Disc in March, 1945. (by wikipedia)

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Peanuts Hucko, Jack Teagarden and Jack Lesberg
at the Famous Door, New York, July 1947

And here´s a pretty good compilation of essential Jack Teagarden songs, recorded in the 40´s and 50´s of the last century.

And if you love these old fashinoed jazz tunes … you should listen to this beautiful album …. enjoy !

This album was original released in 1956. my copy is from a re-release from 1963

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Personnel:
Jack Teagarden (rombone, vocals)
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a lot of other musicians (read the backcover of this LP)

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Tracklist:
01. Persian Rug (Kahn/Moret) 2.34
02. I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues (Arlen/Koehler) 2.45
03. Love Me Or Leave Me (Donaldson/Kahn) 3.02
04. The Sheik Of Araby (Smith/Wheeler/Snyder) 3.01
05. Body And Soul (Green/Sour/Heyman/Eyton) 2.52
06. Aunt Hagar’s Blues (Handy) 3.16
07. Love Me (Washington/Young) 3.05
08. Nobody Knows The Trouble I’ve Seen (Traditional) 2.44
09. I’m Gonna Stomp Mr. Henry Lee (Condon(Teagarden/Reubens/Kelly) 2.44
10. Somebody Loves Me (Gershwin/MacDonald/DeSylva) 2.35
11. Blue River (Washington/Young) 2.48
12. Rose Of The Rio Grande (Warren/Gorman/Leslie) 2.22

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Lonnie Donegan – A Golden Age Of Donegan – Vol. 2 (1967)

FrontCover1.JPGAnthony James Donegan MBE (29 April 1931 – 3 November 2002), known as Lonnie Donegan, was a British skiffle singer, songwriter and musician, referred to as the “King of Skiffle”, who influenced 1960s British pop musicians. Born in Scotland and raised in England, he was Britain’s most successful and influential recording artist before The Beatles.

Donegan had 31 UK Top 30 single hits, 24 being successive and three at number one. He was the first British male singer with two US Top 10 hits. Donegan received an Ivor Novello lifetime achievement award in 1997 and in 2000 he was made an MBE.

Lonnie Donegan was born Anthony James Donegan in Bridgeton, Glasgow, Scotland, on 29 April 1931. He was the son of an Irish mother and a Scots father, a professional violinist who had played with the Scottish National Orchestra. In 1933, he moved with his family to East Ham in East London. Donegan was evacuated to Cheshire to escape the Blitz in the Second World War and attended college in Altrincham.

Donegan married three times. He had two daughters (Fiona and Corrina) by his first wife, Maureen Tyler (divorced 1962), a son and a daughter (Anthony and Juanita) by his second wife, Jill Westlake (divorced 1971), and three sons (Peter, David and Andrew)[6] by his third wife, Sharon, whom he married in 1977. Peter Donegan is also a singer and a musician.

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Donegan died on 3 November 2002, at age 71, after a heart attack in Market Deeping, Lincolnshire mid-way through a UK tour, and before he was due to perform at a memorial concert for George Harrison with the Rolling Stones. He had had cardiac problems since the 1970s and had several heart attacks.

As a child growing up in the early 1940s Donegan listened mostly to swing jazz and vocal acts, and became interested in the guitar. Country & western and blues records, particularly by Frank Crumit and Josh White, attracted his interest and he bought his first guitar at 14 in 1945. He learned songs such as “Frankie and Johnny”, “Puttin’ On the Style”, and “The House of the Rising Sun” by listening to BBC radio broadcasts. By the end of the 1940s he was playing guitar around London and visiting small jazz clubs.

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Donegan first played in a major band after Chris Barber heard that he was a good banjo player and, on a train, asked him to audition. Donegan had never played the banjo but he bought one for the audition and succeeded more on personality than talent. His stint with Barber’s trad jazz band was interrupted when he was called up for National Service in 1949, but while in the army at Southampton, he was the drummer in Ken Grinyer’s Wolverines Jazz Band at a local pub. A posting to Vienna brought him into contact with American troops, and access to US records and the American Forces Network radio station.

In 1952 he formed the Tony Donegan Jazzband, which played around London. On 28 June 1952 at the Royal Festival Hall they opened for the blues musician Lonnie Johnson. Donegan adopted his first name as a tribute. He used the name at a concert at the Royal Albert Hall on 2 June 1952.

LonnieDonegan04In 1953 cornetist Ken Colyer was imprisoned in New Orleans for a visa problem. He returned to Britain and joined Chris Barber’s band. They changed the name to Ken Colyer’s Jazzmen and made its first public appearance on 11 April 1953 in Copenhagen. The following day, Chris Albertson recorded Ken Colyer’s Jazzmen and the Monty Sunshine Trio – Sunshine, Barber, and Donegan – for Storyville Records. These were Donegan’s first commercial recordings.

While in Ken Colyer’s Jazzmen with Chris Barber, Donegan sang and played guitar and banjo in their Dixieland set. He began playing with two other band members during the intervals, to provide what posters called a “skiffle” break, a name suggested by Ken Colyer’s brother, Bill, after the Dan Burley Skiffle Group of the 1930s. In 1954 Colyer left, and the band became Chris Barber’s Jazz Band.

With a washboard, tea-chest bass and a cheap Spanish guitar, Donegan played folk and blues songs by artists such as Lead Belly and Woody Guthrie. This proved popular and in July 1954 he recorded a fast version of Leadbelly’s “Rock Island Line”, featuring a washboard but not a tea-chest bass, with “John Henry” on the B-side. It was a hit in 1956 (which also later inspired the creation of a full album, An Englishman Sings American Folk Songs, released in America on the Mercury label in the early 1960s), but, because it was a band recording, Donegan made no money beyond his session fee. It was the first debut record to go gold in the UK, and it reached the Top Ten in the United States. This recording has proved greatly influential on musicians who heard it in their younger days and for whom it seems to have been a catalyst in their musical motivation and careers.

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His next single for Decca, “Diggin’ My Potatoes”, was recorded at a concert at the Royal Festival Hall on 30 October 1954. Decca dropped Donegan thereafter, but within a month he was at the Abbey Road Studios in London recording for EMI’s Columbia label. He had left the Barber band, and by spring 1955, signed a recording contract with Pye. His next single “Lost John” reached No. 2 in the UK Singles Chart.

He appeared on television in the United States on the Perry Como Show and the Paul Winchell Show. Returning to the UK, he recorded his debut album, Lonnie Donegan Showcase, in summer 1956, with songs by Lead Belly and Leroy Carr, plus “I’m a Ramblin’ Man” and “Wabash Cannonball”. The LP sold hundreds of thousands. The skiffle style encouraged amateurs and one of many groups that followed was the Quarrymen, formed in March 1957 by John Lennon. Donegan’s “Gamblin’ Man”/”Puttin’ On the Style” single was number one in the UK in July 1957, when Lennon first met Paul McCartney.

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Donegan went on to successes such as “Cumberland Gap” and “Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On the Bedpost Overnight?)”, his biggest hit in the U.S., on Dot. He turned to music hall style with “My Old Man’s a Dustman” which was not well received by skiffle fans and unsuccessful in America on Atlantic in 1960. But it reached number one in the UK. Donegan’s group had a flexible line-up, but was generally Denny Wright or Les Bennetts (of Les Hobeaux and Days of Skiffle, led by singer Dave George), playing lead guitar and singing harmony, Micky Ashman or Pete Huggett – later Steve Jones – on upright bass, Nick Nichols – later Pete Appleby, Mark Goodwin and Ken Rodway (now a Christian author and minister) on drums or percussion, and Donegan playing acoustic guitar or banjo and singing the lead.

He continued in the UK charts until 1962, before succumbing to The Beatles and beat music.

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Donegan recorded sporadically during the 1960s, including sessions at Hickory Records in Nashville, Tennessee, with Charlie McCoy, Floyd Cramer and the Jordanaires. After 1964, he was a record producer for most of the decade at Pye Records. Among those he worked with was Justin Hayward.

Donegan was unfashionable through the late 1960s and 1970s (although his “I’ll Never Fall in Love Again” was recorded by Tom Jones in 1967 and Elvis Presley in 1976), and he began to play the American cabaret circuit. A departure from his normal style was an a cappella recording of “The Party’s Over”.

There was a reunion concert with the original Chris Barber band in Croydon in June 1975. A bomb scare meant that the recording had to be finished in the studio, after an impromptu concert in the car park.[citation needed] The release was entitled The Great Re-Union Album.

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Georgie Fame, Lonnie Donnegan, Reg Presley (The Troggs) & Van Morrison, 1995

He had his first heart attack in 1976 while in the United States and had quadruple bypass surgery. He returned to attention in 1978 when he recorded his early songs with Rory Gallagher, Ringo Starr, Elton John and Brian May. The album was called Putting on the Style. A follow-up featuring Albert Lee saw Donegan in less familiar country and western vein. By 1980, he was making regular concert appearances again, and another album with Barber followed. In 1983 Donegan toured with Billie Jo Spears, and in 1984, he made his theatrical debut in a revival of the 1920 musical Mr Cinders. More concert tours followed, with a move from Florida to Spain. In 1992 he had further bypass surgery following another heart attack.

In 1994, the Chris Barber band celebrated 40 years with a tour with both bands. Pat Halcox was still on trumpet (a position he retained until July 2008). The reunion concert and the tour were on CD and DVD.

Donegan had a late renaissance when in 2000 he appeared on Van Morrison’s album The Skiffle Sessions – Live in Belfast 1998, an acclaimed album featuring him singing with Morrison and Chris Barber, with a guest appearance by Dr John. Donegan also played at Glastonbury Festival in 1999, and was made an MBE in 2000.

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Donegan also appeared at Fairport Convention’s annual music festival on 9 August 2001. His final CD was This Yere de Story.

Mark Knopfler released a tribute to Donegan entitled “Donegan’s Gone” on his 2004 album, Shangri-La, and said he was one of his greatest influences.[2] Donegan’s music formed a musical starring his two sons. Lonnie D – The Musical took its name from the Chas & Dave tribute song which started the show. Subsequently, Peter Donegan formed a band to perform his father’s material and has since linked with his father’s band from the last 30 years with newcomer Eddie Masters on bass. They made an album together in 2009 entitled “Here We Go Again”. Donegan’s eldest son, Anthony, also formed his own band, as Lonnie Donegan Jnr.

On his album A Beach Full of Shells, Al Stewart paid tribute to Donegan in the song “Katherine of Oregon”. In “Class of ’58” he describes a British entertainer who is either Donegan or a composite including him.

Peter Sellers recorded Puttin’ on the Smile featuring “Lenny Goonagain”, who travels to the “Deep South” of Brighton and finds an “obscure folk song hidden at the top of the American hit parade”, re-records it and reaches number one in the UK.

During the situation between Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien, David Letterman, pretending to try to remember Jimmy Fallon’s name, called him “Lonnie Donegan.” (by wikipedia)

And here´s another sampler with his most popular songs fromthe Fifites … a great collection, a great chance to discover a man, who influenced many of the British rock musicians from the Sixties.

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Personnel:

 

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Tracklist:
01. Tom Dooley (A. Lomax/Warner/J. Lomax) 3.17
02. Michael, Row The Boat (Donegan) 2.27
03. Lively! (Donegan/Buchanan) 3.17
04. Bring A Little Water, Sylvie (“Sylvie”) (Ledbetter/Donegan/Campbell) 2.26
05. Jack O’ Diamonds (Sampson/Lomax) 2.49
06. Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On The Bedpost Overnight?) (Rose/ Breuer/Bloom) 2.40
07. Talking Guitar Blues (Tubb) 2.01
08. Don’t You Rock Me Daddy-O (Varley/Whyton) 1.43
09. Jimmie Brown The Newsboy (Carter) 2.40
10. Gamblin’ Man (Donegan/Guthrie) 3.20

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Edith Piaf – Les plus grands succés (1963)

FrontCover1Edith Piaf, byname of Edith Giovanna Gassion, (born December 19, 1915, Paris, France—died October 10, 1963, Plascassier, near Grasse [see Researcher’s Note]), French singer and actress whose interpretation of the chanson, or French ballad, made her internationally famous. Among her trademark songs were “Non, je ne regrette rien” (“No, I Don’t Regret Anything”) and “La Vie en rose” (literally “Life in Pink” [i.e., through “rose-coloured glasses,” from an optimistic point of view]).

Piaf’s songs and singing style seemed to reflect the tragedies of her own difficult life. Her mother, a café singer, abandoned her at birth, and she was taken in by her grandmother, who reared the girl in a brothel. Piaf reportedly became blind at age three as a complication of meningitis but recovered her sight four years later. A few years after that she joined her father, a circus acrobat, and accompanied him while he performed. She sang in the streets of Paris, earning a meagre living while often in the company of petty criminals. Piaf gave birth to a daughter in 1932, but the child died two years later from meningitis. In 1935 she was discovered by Louis Leplée, a cabaret owner, who gave her her first nightclub job. It was Leplée who began calling her “la môme piaf,” Parisian slang for “little sparrow,” in apparent reference to her diminutive size—under 5 feet (142 cm) tall and about 90 pounds (40 kg) in weight. She later adopted the name professionally. Her debut was acclaimed by the actor Maurice Chevalier, who was in the audience that night.

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In 1935 Piaf made her theatrical debut, and within a few years she was singing in the large music halls of Paris. Initially her material was standard music hall fare, but eventually she had songwriters such as Marguerite Monnot and Michel Emer writing songs specifically for her. In the mid-1940s she became a mentor to the young Yves Montand, and she worked with him in the film Étoile sans lumière (1946; “Star Without Light”). She had an affair with the middleweight boxer Marcel Cerdan, who died in a plane crash on his way to meet her. Her unhappy personal life and unadorned though dramatic style underlined her expressive voice, and she was able to move audiences with her passionate rendition of songs that were often about loss and love. In her later life, Piaf was involved in several serious car accidents, and she suffered from failing health, partly due to alcohol and drug abuse. She died at the age of 47, reportedly from liver cancer. Her death was mourned across France, and thousands lined the route of her funeral procession.

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In addition to singing, Piaf recorded her thoughts about her life in two books, Au bal de la chance (1958; “At the Ball of Fortune”; Eng. trans. The Wheel of Fortune) and the posthumously published Ma vie (1964; My Life). She was the subject of several biographies as well as plays and movies. (britannica.com)

And here´s a great sampler with songs recorded between 1949 and 1961 … a greates hits album of course.

Edith Piaf was one of the most important singers in France … emjoy her very special voice … enjoy all these chansons.

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Personnel:
Edith Piaf (vocals)
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Robert Chauvigny Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. Les Trois Cloches (Villard) 4.06
02. Hymne À L’amour (Piaf/Monnot) 3.25
03. La Vie En Rose (Piaf/Louiguy) 3.07
04. Padam..Padam (Contet/Glanzberg) 3.15
05. La Goualante Du Pauvre Jean (Rouzaud/Monnot) 2.01
06. C’est A Hambourg (Delécluse/Senlis/Monnot) 2.57
07. Milord (Moustaki/Monnot) 4.27
08. C’est L’amour (Piaf/Monnot) 2.58
09. Cri Du Coeur (Prevert/Crolla) 2.34
10. Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien (Vaucaire/Dumont) 2.20
11. Jerusalem (Chabrier/Moutet) 3.57
12. Exodus (Marnay/Gold) 3.27

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Edith Piaf03.jpgÉdith Piaf (19 December 1915 – 10 October 1963)

Lonnie Donegan – A Golden Age Of Donegan (1966)

FrontCover1.JPGAnthony James Donegan MBE (29 April 1931 – 3 November 2002), known as Lonnie Donegan, was a British skiffle singer, songwriter and musician, referred to as the “King of Skiffle”, who influenced 1960s British pop musicians.[1][2][3] Born in Scotland and raised in England, he was Britain’s most successful and influential recording artist before The Beatles.

Donegan had 31 UK Top 30 single hits, 24 being successive and three at number one. He was the first British male singer with two US Top 10 hits. Donegan received an Ivor Novello lifetime achievement award in 1997 and in 2000 he was made an MBE.

Lonnie Donegan was born Anthony James Donegan in Bridgeton, Glasgow, Scotland, on 29 April 1931. He was the son of an Irish mother and a Scots father, a professional violinist who had played with the Scottish National Orchestra. In 1933, he moved with his family to East Ham in East London.[5] Donegan was evacuated to Cheshire to escape the Blitz in the Second World War and attended college in Altrincham.

Donegan married three times. He had two daughters (Fiona and Corrina) by his first wife, Maureen Tyler (divorced 1962), a son and a daughter (Anthony and Juanita) by his second wife, Jill Westlake (divorced 1971), and three sons (Peter, David and Andrew)[6] by his third wife, Sharon, whom he married in 1977. Peter Donegan is also a singer and a musician.

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Donegan died on 3 November 2002, at age 71, after a heart attack in Market Deeping, Lincolnshire mid-way through a UK tour, and before he was due to perform at a memorial concert for George Harrison with the Rolling Stones. He had had cardiac problems since the 1970s and had several heart attacks.

As a child growing up in the early 1940s Donegan listened mostly to swing jazz and vocal acts, and became interested in the guitar. Country & western and blues records, particularly by Frank Crumit and Josh White, attracted his interest and he bought his first guitar at 14 in 1945. He learned songs such as “Frankie and Johnny”, “Puttin’ On the Style”, and “The House of the Rising Sun” by listening to BBC radio broadcasts. By the end of the 1940s he was playing guitar around London and visiting small jazz clubs.

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Donegan first played in a major band after Chris Barber heard that he was a good banjo player and, on a train, asked him to audition. Donegan had never played the banjo but he bought one for the audition and succeeded more on personality than talent. His stint with Barber’s trad jazz band was interrupted when he was called up for National Service in 1949, but while in the army at Southampton, he was the drummer in Ken Grinyer’s Wolverines Jazz Band at a local pub. A posting to Vienna brought him into contact with American troops, and access to US records and the American Forces Network radio station.

In 1952 he formed the Tony Donegan Jazzband, which played around London. On 28 June 1952 at the Royal Festival Hall they opened for the blues musician Lonnie Johnson. Donegan adopted his first name as a tribute. He used the name at a concert at the Royal Albert Hall on 2 June 1952.

LonnieDonegan04In 1953 cornetist Ken Colyer was imprisoned in New Orleans for a visa problem. He returned to Britain and joined Chris Barber’s band. They changed the name to Ken Colyer’s Jazzmen and made its first public appearance on 11 April 1953 in Copenhagen. The following day, Chris Albertson recorded Ken Colyer’s Jazzmen and the Monty Sunshine Trio – Sunshine, Barber, and Donegan – for Storyville Records. These were Donegan’s first commercial recordings.

While in Ken Colyer’s Jazzmen with Chris Barber, Donegan sang and played guitar and banjo in their Dixieland set. He began playing with two other band members during the intervals, to provide what posters called a “skiffle” break, a name suggested by Ken Colyer’s brother, Bill, after the Dan Burley Skiffle Group of the 1930s. In 1954 Colyer left, and the band became Chris Barber’s Jazz Band.

With a washboard, tea-chest bass and a cheap Spanish guitar, Donegan played folk and blues songs by artists such as Lead Belly and Woody Guthrie. This proved popular and in July 1954 he recorded a fast version of Leadbelly’s “Rock Island Line”, featuring a washboard but not a tea-chest bass, with “John Henry” on the B-side. It was a hit in 1956 (which also later inspired the creation of a full album, An Englishman Sings American Folk Songs, released in America on the Mercury label in the early 1960s), but, because it was a band recording, Donegan made no money beyond his session fee. It was the first debut record to go gold in the UK, and it reached the Top Ten in the United States. This recording has proved greatly influential on musicians who heard it in their younger days and for whom it seems to have been a catalyst in their musical motivation and careers.

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His next single for Decca, “Diggin’ My Potatoes”, was recorded at a concert at the Royal Festival Hall on 30 October 1954. Decca dropped Donegan thereafter, but within a month he was at the Abbey Road Studios in London recording for EMI’s Columbia label. He had left the Barber band, and by spring 1955, signed a recording contract with Pye. His next single “Lost John” reached No. 2 in the UK Singles Chart.

He appeared on television in the United States on the Perry Como Show and the Paul Winchell Show. Returning to the UK, he recorded his debut album, Lonnie Donegan Showcase, in summer 1956, with songs by Lead Belly and Leroy Carr, plus “I’m a Ramblin’ Man” and “Wabash Cannonball”. The LP sold hundreds of thousands. The skiffle style encouraged amateurs and one of many groups that followed was the Quarrymen, formed in March 1957 by John Lennon. Donegan’s “Gamblin’ Man”/”Puttin’ On the Style” single was number one in the UK in July 1957, when Lennon first met Paul McCartney.

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Donegan went on to successes such as “Cumberland Gap” and “Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On the Bedpost Overnight?)”, his biggest hit in the U.S., on Dot. He turned to music hall style with “My Old Man’s a Dustman” which was not well received by skiffle fans and unsuccessful in America on Atlantic in 1960. But it reached number one in the UK. Donegan’s group had a flexible line-up, but was generally Denny Wright or Les Bennetts (of Les Hobeaux and Days of Skiffle, led by singer Dave George), playing lead guitar and singing harmony, Micky Ashman or Pete Huggett – later Steve Jones – on upright bass, Nick Nichols – later Pete Appleby, Mark Goodwin and Ken Rodway (now a Christian author and minister) on drums or percussion, and Donegan playing acoustic guitar or banjo and singing the lead.

He continued in the UK charts until 1962, before succumbing to The Beatles and beat music.

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Donegan recorded sporadically during the 1960s, including sessions at Hickory Records in Nashville, Tennessee, with Charlie McCoy, Floyd Cramer and the Jordanaires. After 1964, he was a record producer for most of the decade at Pye Records. Among those he worked with was Justin Hayward.

Donegan was unfashionable through the late 1960s and 1970s (although his “I’ll Never Fall in Love Again” was recorded by Tom Jones in 1967 and Elvis Presley in 1976), and he began to play the American cabaret circuit. A departure from his normal style was an a cappella recording of “The Party’s Over”.

There was a reunion concert with the original Chris Barber band in Croydon in June 1975. A bomb scare meant that the recording had to be finished in the studio, after an impromptu concert in the car park.[citation needed] The release was entitled The Great Re-Union Album.

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Georgie Fame, Lonnie Donnegan, Reg Presley (The Troggs) & Van Morrison, 1995

He had his first heart attack in 1976 while in the United States and had quadruple bypass surgery. He returned to attention in 1978 when he recorded his early songs with Rory Gallagher, Ringo Starr, Elton John and Brian May. The album was called Putting on the Style. A follow-up featuring Albert Lee saw Donegan in less familiar country and western vein. By 1980, he was making regular concert appearances again, and another album with Barber followed. In 1983 Donegan toured with Billie Jo Spears, and in 1984, he made his theatrical debut in a revival of the 1920 musical Mr Cinders. More concert tours followed, with a move from Florida to Spain. In 1992 he had further bypass surgery following another heart attack.

In 1994, the Chris Barber band celebrated 40 years with a tour with both bands. Pat Halcox was still on trumpet (a position he retained until July 2008). The reunion concert and the tour were on CD and DVD.

Donegan had a late renaissance when in 2000 he appeared on Van Morrison’s album The Skiffle Sessions – Live in Belfast 1998, an acclaimed album featuring him singing with Morrison and Chris Barber, with a guest appearance by Dr John. Donegan also played at Glastonbury Festival in 1999, and was made an MBE in 2000.

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Donegan also appeared at Fairport Convention’s annual music festival on 9 August 2001. His final CD was This Yere de Story.

Mark Knopfler released a tribute to Donegan entitled “Donegan’s Gone” on his 2004 album, Shangri-La, and said he was one of his greatest influences.[2] Donegan’s music formed a musical starring his two sons. Lonnie D – The Musical took its name from the Chas & Dave tribute song which started the show. Subsequently, Peter Donegan formed a band to perform his father’s material and has since linked with his father’s band from the last 30 years with newcomer Eddie Masters on bass. They made an album together in 2009 entitled “Here We Go Again”. Donegan’s eldest son, Anthony, also formed his own band, as Lonnie Donegan Jnr.

On his album A Beach Full of Shells, Al Stewart paid tribute to Donegan in the song “Katherine of Oregon”. In “Class of ’58” he describes a British entertainer who is either Donegan or a composite including him.

Peter Sellers recorded Puttin’ on the Smile featuring “Lenny Goonagain”, who travels to the “Deep South” of Brighton and finds an “obscure folk song hidden at the top of the American hit parade”, re-records it and reaches number one in the UK.

During the situation between Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien, David Letterman, pretending to try to remember Jimmy Fallon’s name, called him “Lonnie Donegan.” (by wikipedia)

And here´s a sampler with his most popular songs fromthe Fifites … a great collection, a great chance to discover a man, who influenced many of the British rock musicians from the Sixties.

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Personnel:

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Tracklist:
01. Have A Drink On Me (Lomax/Ledbetter/Donegan/Buchanan) 2.49
02. Nobody Loves Like An Irishman (Donegan) 2.41
03. Cumberland Gap (Donegan) 1.58
04. Seven Golden Daffodils (Mosley/Hayes) 3.02
05. Puttin’ On The Style (Cazden) 3.24
06. Battle Of New Orleans (Traditional 3.10
07. Rock O’ My Soul (Traditional) 2.31
08. Fort Worth Jail (Reinhardt) 2.13
09. Grand Coulee Dam (Donegan/Guthrie) 2.39
10. My Old Man’s A Dustman (Ballad Of A Refuse Disposal Officer) (Donegan/Buchanan) 3.21

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Lonnie Donegan (29 April 1931 – 3 November 2002)