Gene Vincent – The Crazy Beat Of Gene Vincent (1963)

FrontCover1Vincent Eugene Craddock (February 11, 1935 – October 12, 1971), known as Gene Vincent, was an American musician who pioneered the styles of rock and roll and rockabilly. His 1956 top ten hit with his Blue Caps, “Be-Bop-A-Lula”, is considered a significant early example of rockabilly. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

Craddock was born February 11, 1935, in Norfolk, Virginia, United States,[1] to Mary Louise and Ezekiah Jackson Craddock. His musical influences included country, rhythm and blues and gospel music. His favourite composition was Beethoven’s Egmont overture. He showed his first real interest in music while his family lived in Munden Point (now Virginia Beach), in Princess Anne County, Virginia, near the North Carolina line, where they ran a country store. He received his first guitar at the age of twelve as a gift from a friend.

Vincent’s father volunteered to serve in the U.S. Coast Guard and patrolled American coastal waters to protect Allied shipping against German U-boats during World War II. Vincent’s mother maintained the general store in Munden Point. His parents moved the family to Norfolk, the home of a large naval base, and opened a general store and sailors’ tailoring shop.

GeneVincent01Vincent dropped out of school in 1952, at the age of seventeen, and enlisted in the United States Navy. As he was under the age of enlistment, his parents signed the forms allowing him to enter. He completed boot camp and joined the fleet as a crewman aboard the fleet oiler USS Chukawan, with a two-week training period in the repair ship USS Amphion, before returning to the Chukawan. He never saw combat but completed a Korean War deployment. He sailed home from Korean waters aboard the battleship USS Wisconsin but was not part of the ship’s company.

Craddock planned a career in the Navy and, in 1955, used his $612 re-enlistment bonus to buy a new Triumph motorcycle. In July 1955, while he was in Norfolk, his left leg was shattered in a motorcycle crash. He refused to allow the leg to be amputated, and the leg was saved, but the injury left him with a limp and pain. He wore a steel sheath around the leg[3] for the rest of his life. Most accounts relate the accident as the fault of a drunk driver who struck him, but some claim Craddock had been riding drunk. Years later in some of his music biographies, there is no mention of an accident, but it was claimed that his injury was due to a wound incurred in combat in Korea. He spent time in the Portsmouth Naval Hospital and was medically discharged from the Navy shortly thereafter.

Craddock became involved in the local music scene in Norfolk. He changed his name to Gene Vincent and formed a rockabilly band, Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps (a term used in reference to enlisted sailors in the U.S. Navy). The band included Willie Williams on rhythm guitar (replaced in late 1956 by Paul Peek), Jack Neal on upright bass, Dickie Harrell on drums, and Cliff Gallup on lead guitar. He also collaborated with another rising musician, Jay Chevalier of Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Vincent and His Blue Caps soon gained a reputation playing in various country bars in Norfolk. There they won a talent contest organized by a local radio DJ, “Sheriff Tex” Davis, who became Vincent’s manager.

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In 1956 he wrote “Be-Bop-A-Lula”, which drew comparisons to Elvis Presley[2] and which Rolling Stone magazine later listed as number 103 on its “500 Greatest Songs of All Time”. Local radio DJ “Sheriff Tex” Davis arranged for a demo of the song to be made, and this secured Vincent a contract with Capitol Records. He signed a publishing contract with Bill Lowery of the Lowery Group of music publishers in Atlanta, Georgia. “Be-Bop-A-Lula” was not on Vincent’s first album and was picked by Capitol producer Ken Nelson as the B-side of his first single, “Woman Love”. Prior to the release of the single, Lowery pressed promotional copies of “Be-Bop-A-Lula” and sent them to radio stations throughout the country. By the time Capitol released the single, “Be-Bop-A-Lula” had already gained attention from the public and radio DJs. The song was picked up and played by other U.S. radio stations (obscuring the original A-side song) and became a hit, peaking at number 5 and spending 20 weeks on the Billboard pop chart and reaching number 5 and spending 17 weeks on the Cashbox chart, and launching Vincent’s career as a rock-and-roll star.

GeneVincent02After “Be-Bop-A-Lula” became a hit, Vincent and His Blue Caps were unable to follow it up with the same level of commercial success, although they released critically acclaimed songs like “Race with the Devil” (number 96 on the Billboard chart and number 50 on the Cashbox chart) and “Bluejean Bop” (number 49 on the Billboard chart and another million-selling disc).

Cliff Gallup left the band in 1956, and Russell Williford joined as the new guitarist for the Blue Caps. Williford played and toured Canada with Vincent in late 1956 but left the group in early 1957. Gallup came back to do the next album and then left again. Williford came back and exited again before Johnny Meeks joined the band. The group had another hit in 1957 with “Lotta Lovin'” (highest position number 13 and spending 19 weeks on the Billboard chart and number 17 and 17 weeks on the Cashbox chart). Vincent was awarded gold records for two million sales of “Be-Bop-A-Lula”,[8] and 1.5 million sales of “Lotta Lovin'”.[citation needed] The same year he toured the east coast of Australia with Little Richard and Eddie Cochran, drawing audiences totaling 72,000 to their Sydney Stadium concerts. Vincent also made an appearance in the film The Girl Can’t Help It, with Jayne Mansfield, performing “Be-Bop-A-Lula” with the Blue Caps in a rehearsal room. “Dance to the Bop” was released by Capitol Records on October 28, 1957. On November 17, 1957, Vincent and His Blue Caps performed the song on the nationally broadcast television program The Ed Sullivan Show.[10] The song spent nine weeks on the Billboard chart and peaked at number 23 on January 23, 1958 and reached number 36 and spent eight weeks on the Cashbox chart. It was Vincent’s last American hit single. The song was used in the movie Hot Rod Gang for a dance rehearsal scene featuring dancers doing the West Coast Swing.

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Vincent and His Blue Caps also appeared several times on Town Hall Party, California’s largest country music barn dance, held at the Town Hall in Compton, California. Town Hall Party drew in excess of 2,800 paid admissions each Friday and Saturday, with room for 1,200 dancers. The show was also broadcast from 8:30 to 9:30 pm on the NBC Radio network. It was also shown on KTTV, channel 11, from 10 pm to 1 am on Saturday nights.[14] Vincent and His Blue Caps appeared on October 25, 1958, and July 25 and November 7, 1959. They performed “Be-Bop-A-Lula”, “High Blood Pressure”, “Rip It Up”, “Dance to the Bop”, “You Win Again”, “For Your Precious Love”, “Rocky Road Blues”, “Pretty Pearly”, “High School Confidential”, “Over the Rainbow”, “Roll Over Beethoven” and “She She Little Sheila”.

A dispute with the US tax authorities and the American Musicians’ Union over payments to his band and his having sold the band’s equipment to pay a tax bill led Vincent to leave the United States for Europe.

On December 15, 1959, Vincent appeared on Jack Good’s TV show, Boy Meets Girl, his first appearance in England. He wore black leather, gloves, and a medallion, and stood in a hunched posture. Good is credited with the transformation of Vincent’s image.[1] After the TV appearance he toured France, the Netherlands, Germany and the UK performing in his US stage clothes.

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On April 16, 1960, while on tour in the UK, Vincent, Eddie Cochran and the songwriter Sharon Sheeley were involved in a high-speed traffic accident in a private-hire taxi in Chippenham, Wiltshire. Vincent broke his ribs and collarbone and further damaged his weakened leg. Sheeley suffered a broken pelvis. Cochran, who had been thrown from the vehicle, suffered serious brain injuries and died the next day. Vincent returned to the United States after the accident.

Promoter Don Arden had Vincent return to the UK in 1961 to do an extensive tour in theatres and ballrooms, with Chris Wayne and the Echoes. After the overwhelming success of the tour, Vincent moved to Britain in 1963. His accompanying band, Sounds Incorporated, a six-piece outfit with three saxophones, guitar, bass and drums, went on to play with the Beatles at their Shea Stadium concert. Vincent toured the UK again in 1963 with the Outlaws, featuring future Deep Purple guitar player Ritchie Blackmore, as a backing band. Vincent’s alcohol problems marred the tour, resulting in problems both on stage and with the band and management.

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Vincent’s attempts to re-establish his American career in folk rock and country rock proved unsuccessful; he is remembered today for recordings of the 1950s and early 1960s released by Capitol Records. In the early 1960s, he also put out tracks on EMI’s Columbia label, including a cover of Arthur Alexander’s “Where Have You Been All My Life?” A backing band called the Shouts joined him.

In 1966 and 1967, in the United States, he recorded for Challenge Records, backed by ex-members of the Champs and Glen Campbell. Challenge released three singles in the US, and the UK London label released two singles and collected recordings on to an LP, Gene Vincent, on the UK London label in 1967. Although well received, none sold well. In 1968 in a hotel in Germany, Vincent tried to shoot Gary Glitter. He fired several shots but missed and a frightened Glitter left the country the next day.

In 1969, he recorded the album I’m Back and I’m Proud for long-time fan John Peel’s Dandelion Records, produced by Kim Fowley with arrangements by Skip Battin (of the Byrds), and backing vocals by Linda Ronstadt. He recorded two other albums for Kama Sutra Records, reissued on one CD by Rev-Ola in March 2008. On his 1969 tour of the UK he was backed by the Wild Angels, a British band that had performed at the Royal Albert Hall with Bill Haley & His Comets and Duane Eddy. Because of pressure from his ex-wife, the Inland Revenue and promoter Don Arden, Vincent returned to the US.

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His final US recordings were four tracks for Rockin’ Ronny Weiser’s Rolling Rock label, a few weeks before his death. These were released on a compilation album of tribute songs, including “Say Mama”, by his daughter, Melody Jean Vincent, accompanied by Johnny Meeks (of Blue Caps and Merle Haggard’s The Strangers) on guitar. He later recorded four tracks (released years later as The Last Session) in Britain in October 1971 as part of his last tour. He was backed by Richard Cole and Kansas Hook (Dave Bailey, Bob Moore, Richard Cole and bass player Charlie Harrison from Poco and Roger McGuinn’s Thunderbyrd). They recorded five tracks at the BBC studios in Maida Vale, London, for Johnnie Walker’s radio show. He managed one show at the Garrick Night Club in Leigh, Lancashire, and two shows at the Wookey Hollow Club in Liverpool on October 3 and 4. Vincent then returned to the US and died a few days later. Four of these tracks were later released on the BBC’s own label prefix BEEB001 called The Last Session; this includes a version of “Say Mama”. The four tracks are now on Vincent’s album White Lightning.

Vincent died at the age of 36 on October 12, 1971, from a ruptured stomach ulcer, while visiting his father in Saugus, California. He is interred at Eternal Valley Memorial Park, in Newhall, California.

Ian Dury paid tribute to him in the 1976 song “Sweet Gene Vincent”.

GeneVincent08Vincent was the first inductee into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame upon its formation in 1997. The following year he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Vincent has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1749 North Vine Street. In 2012, his band, the Blue Caps, were retroactively inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by a special committee, alongside Vincent. On Tuesday, September 23, 2003, Vincent was honored with a Norfolk’s Legends of Music Walk of Fame bronze star embedded in the Granby Street sidewalk.

Writing for AllMusic, Ritchie Unterberger called Vincent an “American rockabilly legend who defined the greasy-haired, leather-jacketed, hot rods ‘n’ babes spark of rock & roll”. Village Voice critic Robert Christgau was less impressed by the musician’s career, saying “Vincent was never a titan—his few moments of rockabilly greatness were hyped-up distillations of slavering lust from a sensitive little guy who was just as comfortable with ‘Over the Rainbow’ in his normal frame of mind.” However, the critic included the 1974 Vincent compilation album, The Bop That Just Won’t Stop (1956), in his “basic record library” published in Christgau’s Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies (1981). (by wikipedia)

And here´s a pretty good sampler witha lot of his hits and some rarities … Oh yes .. Genen Vincent was true Rock N Roller … Listen and enjoy  !

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Personnel:
Gene Vincent & The Blue Caps

Ths great French backcover:
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Tracklist:
01. Crazy Beat (Fallin/Rhodes) 2.17
02. Important Words (Vincent/Davis) 2.53
03. It´s Been Nice (Pomus/Shuman) 2.03
04. Lonesome Boy (Bedwell) 3.01
05. Good Lovin’ (Calaban/Rorie) 2.04
06. I’m Gonna Catch Me A Rat (Robinson) 2.14
07. Rip It Up (Blackwell/Marascalco) 2.23
08. High Blood Pressure (Smith) 2.50
09. That’s The Trouble With Love (Huling/Shilton) 2.23
10. Weeping Willow (Lynn) 2.40
11. Tear Drops (Glasser) 2.36
12. Gone, Gone, Gone (South) 2.09
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13. Wild Cat (Schroeder/Gold) 2.24
14, Spaceship To Mars (Subotsky/Paramor) 2.06
15. Crazy Beat (alternate version) (Fallin/Rhodes) 2.12
16. Lonesome Boy (alternate version) (Bedwell) 3.12
17. Spaceship To Mars (alternate version) (Subotsky/Paramor) 2.57

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Gene Vincent (February 11, 1935 – October 12, 1971)

Digno Garcia Y Su Trio Del Paraguay – Rythmes d’Amerique Latine (Mid 60´s)

FrontCover1Digno Garcia was born in the Paraguayan village of Luque, not far from the capital Asunción in 1919.

When Digno was a boy, his father forbade him to play harp, so he temporarily changed to guitar. At the age of 17 his uncle took him to the harbour of Asunción in search of suitable wood to build a harp. With the harp he made, he introduced a whole new style, with a very distinctive Digno Garcia rhythm. On that same harp he composed his first great success, Cascada, a harp solo inspired by the Chololo waterfall in Piribebuy.

Luckily, a record company attended one of his performances and offered him a contract. He then toured South America and Mexico.

In the early fifties, Paraguay entrusted its top 3 musicians with a 2-year mission during which they would travel around the world as the country’s cultural ambassadors Trio Los Paraguayos. This trio consisted of Agustín Barboza (known as king of the Guárania – Paraguayan love song), Luis Alberto del Parana as lead vocalist and Digno Garcia, harpist.

Via Genoa, Italy, the trio arrived in Europe in 1954. From there, it went to Belgium. Famous in South America, they were completely unknown to the European public. The Paraguayan consul in Belgium was given the task of launching the trio. Thanks to the intercession of the consul, the director of the casino in Knokke gave the trio the opportunity to open for Gilbert Becaud for an 8-day trial period.

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The success was huge. After three days, the trio was given a contract for July and August. The record company Philips soon learned about the success and offered the trio a record deal.
From Knokke they went to the Monte Carlo Sporting Club, where they were asked to perform on Aristotle Onassis’s yacht. Lobster and crayfish were a whole new experience for the musicians who were used to eating steak and who originated from a country that is landlocked. It was then that Onassis asked Digno if he would play the harp just for him.

After playing in Gstaadt, Switserland, they toured the major European casinos. In the summer of 55, again via a 2-month tour, their succes lead to the Ostend casino doubling the fee they had received from the Knokke casino. There, they were also invited to do a television broadcast from the Philips studios in Hilversum.After that summer and with the cultural mission completed, Perez Prado (known as king of the Mambo) invited the trio on a world tour. Luis del Parana was very enthusiastic, but the other two felt that they could easily continue on their own and that there was no need for them to link up with a mambo orchestra.

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This difference of opinion heralded the end of the trio that, under the name of Trio Los Paraguayos, recorded 3 traditional Paraguayan folk albums (10-inch record) for the Philips label. Luis then called on his brother from Paraguay to form a new trio in Germany and continued to work for the Philips label. Agustín Barboza returned to Paraguay making it his base. Although the three Paraguayans who formed the original trio each went their own separate musical ways, they remained friends for life.

Digno Garcia stayed in Belgium and had a trio come over from Paraguay. From 1957 and 1959, the four of them formed Digno Garcia y su Trio del Paraguay. Between 1959 and 1964, Digno formed the Trio Digno Garcia, together with Felix Rolon and Daniel Cardozo.

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In the meantime, Digno had signed up with Jacques Kluger, the boss of World Music in Belgium. During his Belgian tour in Knokke, Digno met his future wife, Vera Engelen. They married in 1962 and settled in Geraardsbergen where he lived until his death in 1984.

From 1964 till the end of his career, Digno worked with a new trio, Digno Garcia y sus Carios. He played with Lucho Marin and Miguel Angel Gamarra, who were later replaced by Ricardo Ortiz lead singer, and Alfonso Irala, also from Luque, second voice who specialised in playing the requinto guitar. Alfonso joined the trio in spring 1970 and at that time the lead singer was Julio Rojas, who on leaving the trio shortly afterwards, was replaced by Ricardo Ortiz.

Digno Garcia scored his greatest hits with his own rendition of the Cuban traditional song ‘Guantanamera’, and with his personal interpretation of ‘La Felicidad’ and ‘Brigitte Bardot’.
All that time, he continued to make his own harps for which pinewood was imported from Yugoslavia. From Geraardsbergen they toured the globe. Eastern Europe stayed out of their reach, but they did play in Japan, the Philippines, Iceland, the USA, Thailand and Lebanon.

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Every summer Digno returned to Estartit, Spain, from where he toured the Costa Brava. There, he wrote the song ‘Costa Brava’ which topped the charts in Spain for two years in a row (’67-’68). He wrote 80 songs and made about 40 records, which are still very popular today due to their timeless sound.

In 1994, the first posthumous CD was released. In that same year, the first memorial concert ‘Digno Garcia para Siempre’ was organised in Geraardsbergen in Belgium. The memorial concert was such a big success that it had to be moved to the Okapi Forum in Aalst (also in Belgium) where, since 1997, it has its own place in the Flemish music scene.

Digno Garcia specialised not only in playing the harp & Paraguayan folklore but also Spanish & Latin American classics He & his companions toured the world bringing this hitherto almost unknown music to millions. (dignogarcia.com)

Records

And here´s a nice French sampler from the mid 60´s … with music he recorded during the 50´s.

His Paraguayan pop songs specialize in brilliant sound, unusual repertoire and smooth trealment … 

Listen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Digno Garcia Y Su Trio Del Paraguay

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Tracklist:
01. Lupita (Traditional) 3.06
02. Virgen del Campo (Vargas) 2.11
03. Cielito Lindo y Carnavalito (Traditional) 2.29
04. Reicito (Garcia/Alvarez) 2.15
05. India (Guerrero/Flores) 3.56
06. Aurora Divina (Peralta/Aquino) 2.13
07. Me Voy Pa’ El Pueblo (Valdez) 3.15
08. Entre San Juan y Mendoza (Traditional) 2.36
09. En Vano (Ortiz/Garcia) 2.51
10. Cascada (Garcia) 3.34
11. Pasito (Godoy) 2.52
12. Ya Me Voy (Gil) 3.17

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Digno García (Luque, 1919 – Geraardsbergen, 4 February 1984)

Various Artissts – European Jazz – Volume 07 – Great Britain (Part 2) (2012)

FrontCover1At one time, the concept of “European Jazz” meant very little indeed. While jazz was developing in the USA in the 1920s, there was almost no European jazz to speak of. Some Americans – Benny Carter, Coleman Hawkins, Sidney Bechet – came to Europe and made an impact there in the 1930s but it was not until the thirties that Europeans began to develop their own jazz significantly. Perhaps the most outstanding group was the Quintet of the Hot Club of France, formed in 1934, with its two virtuosos Django Reinhardt and Stéphane Grappelli.

This group is not represented in this ten-CD boxed set, which suggests that the compilation is making no attempt at a historical survey. Indeed, it is difficult to know what this set is trying to do. It seems as if the compilers simply put together tracks to which they had access, and there is little attempt to provide a balanced view of European jazz. Nevertheless, this collection can be educative in opening our ears to some artists we may not have heard before. It also supplies a cross-section (albeit limited) of how Europeans developed jazz, mostly in the 1950s and 1960s.

This compilation makes it clear that European jazz was very much influenced by the Americans. For example, the tenorist on track 2 of the third CD sounds very like Stan Getz, while the altoist on the third track betrays the influence of Charlie Parker. And the Michael Naura Quintet on the eighth CD could be mistaken for the Modern Jazz Quartet.

Dizzy Reece

I can’t tell you who most of the individual musicians are, as detailed personnels are sadly not given. This is a nuisance, as I would like to be able to identify (for instance) the bongo Brandenburgplayer on track 9 of the fifth CD. However, one lesson of many tracks in this collection is that many Europeans learnt from the bebop pioneers – and from such groups as the Gerry Mulligan Quartet. As most of the tracks in this compilation come from the fifties and sixties, there is little individuality in the music from the different countries, as it was only later that they began to develop their own distinctive styles.

The next two albums are devoted to Great Britain. They include examples by two neglected tenorists: Wilton “Bogey” Gaynair and Joe Harriott, both with Jamaican origins. Tubby Hayes and the Jazz Couriers deliver their usual hundred-notes-a-minute, while Johnny Dankworth’s orchestra plays some tight arrangements. (musicweb-international.com)

Johnny Dankworth

No, no, no … this compilation is not so weak, as we read above … it´s a great compilation with lots of rarities from the young European Jazz-Scene during the 50´and this time we hear great Jazz from Great Britain ! Excellent stuff !

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Tracklist:

Tubby Hayes and the Jazz Couriers feat. Ronnie Scott:
01. Royal Ascot (Hayes) 5.33
02. On A Misty Night (Dameron) 5.09
03. Cheek To Cheek (Berlin) 4.07

Johnny Dankworth & His Orchestra:
04. Treasure Drive (Dankworth) 2.44
05. Riverside Stomp (Dankworth) 3.32
06. After The Party (Dankworth) 3.34

The Dizzy Reece Quartet:
07. Main Title from “Nowhere To Go“ (Reece) 3.30
08. The Escape And The Chase (Reece) 2.46
09. The Search (On The Scene) (Reece) 3.28
10. Sunset Scene (Nowhere To Go) (Reece) 1.28

Victor Feldman Modern Jazz Quintet – Septet:
11. Umf (Reece) 7.41
12. Bird‘s Last Flight (Gray) 6.32

The Joe Harriott Quintet:
13. Straight Lines (Harriott) 5.55
14. Caravan (Ellington/Tizol) 5.31

Lennie Felix:
15. Scene 59, Act 2 (Felix) 5.07

Vic Ash Sextet feat. Johhny Scott:
16. Just For The Boys (Scott) 2.59

Melody Maker Poll Winners (feat. Tubby Hayes, Ronnie Ross, Bill Le Sage):
17.  Hark Dog (Moule) 5.12

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More from the “European Jazz” edition:

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Marilyn Monroe – The Very Best Of (2000)

FrontCover1.jpgOne of the earliest and most enduring sex symbols of Hollywood, Marilyn Monroe was a talented actress who began a career as a model before foraying into films. The product of a broken home, she did not even know the identity of her biological father. Named as Norma Jeane Mortenson at birth, she spent most of her childhood in foster homes as her mother was mentally unstable and incapable of raising her daughter on her own. The little girl endured a harsh childhood marked by abuse and apathy due to which she suffered from several mental problems later in her life. As a young woman she stared modeling for The Blue Book Modeling Agency and soon became a very successful model thanks to her striking beauty and grace. Eventually she moved on to films, initially appearing in minor roles before bagging more substantial ones. She soon developed an image of a sex symbol by appearing without clothes for the ‘Playboy’ magazine. As an actress she acted in several successful films like ‘The Asphalt Jungle’, ‘The Seven Year Itch’, and ‘The Prince and the Showgirl’. However the final years of her brief life were marked by mental illnesses and alcoholism. Her life was snuffed out untimely when she was just 36 by an overdose of sleeping pills. (thefamouspeople.com)

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Marilyn Monroe, as an actress, I can only stand in small doses. Her movies are excellent, all of them have something worthwhile and redeeming – even the more mundane offerings like ‘Bus Stop’ and ‘Niagra’ are finely-crafted pieces of film – and the more sublime ones like ‘Gentlemen Prefer Blondes’ and ‘Some Like It Hot’ are honest-to-God classic examples of the comic genius of both 1950s Hollywood and Monroe herself.

For all that, however, I can still only watch the pink and fluffy Goddess for short bursts before I long for something that takes itself a little more seriously.

And that’s when I turn to this!

Monroe as a singer I could listen to forever and a day. Worthy of a far higher degree of praise than popular culture has traditionally accorded her, Monroe’s singing is a very rare experience indeed. Her range is impressive, and her style is actually quite thought-provoking – listen to the contrast between the bubblegum-light ‘Down In The Meadow’ and the melancholic, heavy ‘River of no Return’, and you’ll appreciate the fact that, at least as a singer, Monroe was more than capable of shrugging off her Fantasy Gal image for a deeper and more developed means of communication.

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This CD is particularly noteworthy for having all the classics, and also some rarer gems like ‘I’m Gonna File My Claim’ and ‘After You Get What You Want, You Don’t Want It’, both great numbers that are so often omitted from Monroe anthologies and such. Her interpretation of ‘A Fine Romance’ is one of the best ever, and her pairing with the immaculate Jane Russel on ‘Little Girl from Little Rock’ is worth the price of the CD alone.

If you look at all of the most vocally revered female songstresses of this period – Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, Judy Garland – all of them have very fine voices, and an unusual vocal ‘hook’ – Billie’s high acid melancholia, Nina’s deep bass ad-libbing, and Judy’s rolling, emotional high notes – and Monroe is no different.

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Her quivery, quirky soprano is fascinating to listen to, and matches her public personality as well as Ms. Julie Andrews’ voice matches hers. It brings great depth to what would otherwise have been a relatively ordinary voice – but that’s an advantage true of all singers.

One to own and listen to again and again, ‘The Very Best of Marilyn Monroe’ is something anyone with an appreciation of female vocalists will absloutely treasure. (by Review Lover)

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Personnel:
Marilyn Monroe (vocals)
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Jane Russell (vocals on 04., 05. + 08.)
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various orchestras

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Tracklist:
01. Diamonds Are A Girls Best Friend (Styne/(Robin) 3.33
02. Some Like It Hot (Diamond/Berlin/Maineck) 1.20
03. My Heart Belongs To Daddy (Porter/v.Heisen/Cahn) 5.02
04. When Love Goes Wrong (Adamson/Carmichael) 3.29
05. Bye Bye Baby (Kalmar/Adamson/Ruby/Stothart/Carmichael/Styne/Robin) 5.32
06. A Little Girl From Little Rock (D.Daniel/E.Daniel/Styne/Darby/Robin) 3.07
07. River Of No Return (A.Newman/Darby/L.Newman) 2.16
08. I’m Gonna Find My Claim (A.Newman/Darby/L.Newman) 2.39
09. She Acts Like A Woman Should (Delmore/E.Scott/J.Scott) 2.47
10. Kiss (A.Newman/Gillespie/L.Newman) 3.02
11. Lazy (Berlin/Fowler/King) 3.36
12. I Wanna Be Loved By You (Kalmar/Ruby/Stothart/Deutsch) 3.01
13. After You Get What You Want (Berlin) 3.39
14. You’d Be Surprised (Berlin) 3.05
15. Heat Wave (Berlin) 4.24
16. Happy Birthday Mr. President (live) (Traditional) 0.45
17. When I Fall In Love (Heyman/Young) 3.01
18. A Fine Romance (Fields/Kern) 2.22
19. Do It Again (Gershwin/DeSylva) 3.14
20. Down In The Meadow (A.Newman/Darby/L.Newman) 2.30

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Various Artists – The First Recordings of Cretan Music (1940 – 60) (2011)

FrontCover1.jpgBack from Crete …. :

The music of Crete (Greek: Κρητική μουσική), also called kritika (Greek: κρητικά), refers to traditional forms of Greek folk music prevalent on the island of Crete in Greece. Cretan traditional music includes instrumental music (generally also involving singing), a capella songs known as the rizitika, “Erotokritos,” Cretan urban songs (tabachaniotika), as well as other miscellaneous songs and folk genres (lullabies, ritual laments, etc.).

Historically, there have been significant variations in the music across the island (more violin than lyra in far Eastern and Western Crete, a preference for the syrtos in Western Crete and kondylies in Eastern Crete). Some of this variation continues today and in the late-twentieth and early-twenty-first centuries has received greater attention by scholars and the mass media. Nonetheless, over the course of the twentieth-century, the sense of a single, island-wide Cretan musical tradition emerged.

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Although much Cretan music remains consciously close to its folk roots and an integral part of the fabric of many Cretans’ everyday lives, it is also a vibrant and evolving modern, popular tradition that involves many professional and semi-professional musicians, numerous regional record companies and professional distributors, professional luthiers (especially of Cretan lyras and Cretan lutes), and Cretan kentra (clubs for dancing to live Cretan music). (by wikipedia)

And here are some early recordings of this unique sound of Cretan music.

The violin is the prevailling instrument that has been popular in Eastern und Western Crete for years !

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Personnel:
Pantelis Baritantonakis (violin)
Y. Dermitzogiannis (lyre, violin, guitar)
Giorgis Lapokostantakis (violin)
Yannis Papahatzakis (violin, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Kondilies me ti lyra 4.01
02. Ierapetritikos 3.34
03. Varis Haniotikos 3.58
04. Pono krifo i agapi sou 3.04
05. Kondilies me kithara 3.13
06. Haniotika sirta 4.20
07. Pseftiko louloudaki 4.17
08. Ta’mathes Aretousa mou 5.31
09. Makria mou ki an evriskese 2.51
10. Kastrinos horos 4.16
11. Lasithiotika pentozalia 4.01
12. Ithela namoun kladeftis 3.34
13. Rethemniotika sirta 3.41
14. Kondilies Kalogeridi 4.34
15. Irakliotikes kondilies 4.52
16. Pentozalis argos 2.30
17. Tragoudi tou gamou 4.53
18. Lasithiotikes melodies 2.25

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CretanLyrasCretan lyras

Various Artists – Holy Smoke – Don´t Let Love Fool You (2018)

FrontCover1.jpgHere´s a real great compilation with 28 tracks from the grat R & B Era in the USA and we heart aritsts like Jimmy Shaw, Eddie Moore, Jay Nelson, Sonny Boy Williams, Jimmy Mcphail, Little Johnny Cook or Joe Boots.

“Don’t let love fool you!” Attached to this latest release of predominantly rhythm and blues artists from along-gone era is a message warning of the potential pitfalls that can be associated with that thing known as ‘love’. Without wishing to put any dampeners on any future romance, KoKo Mojo sets out its stall with another twenty-eight tracks that certainly rock and blow away any suggestions of the blues. In fact, what any listener is likely to experience for their listening pleasure via ‘Holy Smoke’ is a collection of tracks culled from history and selected for their addictive qualities when it comes to rhythm, but also their relevance to the subject matter at heart here. Therefore, expect songs that are filled with lovesick sentiments where infatuation can take hold – Baby Clifford King ‘Want To Jump With You’ or Tony Allan’s vocals capturing the mood to perfection during the album’s title track – or unrequited love via the forceful rhythm and blues of ‘Don’t You Want A Man Like Me’ from Jay Nelson.

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There’s a wonderful performance from Juke Boy Barner who delivers what sounds like a ramshackle performance during ‘Rock With Me Baby’, only for closer inspection to reveal that there’s deft hands at work here with far more going on under its bonnet. This, however, is only the beginning as from here on, the variety displayed ups its game further from Prince Royals’ superbly understated and centre of attention, ‘Anna Mae’, to the “great” Eddie Alexander & The Greats ‘I’m In Love’ (complete with accompanying ducks!), before rattling off a whole host of sophisticated rhythm and blues numbers such as ‘My Pretty Baby’ (Ernie Williams), ‘Ding Dong Babe’ (Jimmy McPhail), ‘I’ll Be True To You’ (Billy Fair & Orch.), and Little Johnny Cook with ‘Try Your Love’. There’s too much goodness to be found here, despite any notions of hearts being broken, because ‘Holy Smoke’ offers a passionate and classy taste of rhythm and blues that’s packing enough variety to keep any listener entertained for many hours. Top of its class! (by Nathan Olsen-Haines)

In other words: If you plan your next BBQ-Party, don´t forget to play this album … and you´ll have a real hot and crazy party !

This entry is dedicated to all these unknown heroes of Rhythm & Blues !!!

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Tracklist:
01. Baby Clifford King: Want To Jump With You (King) 3.26
02. Johnny Stewart: A Whole Lot Of Lovin’ (Trimble) 2.04
03. Jimmy Shaw: Take A Chance On Me (Shaw/Harris) 2.22
04. Tony Allan: Holy Smoke Baby (E. Mesner/L. Mesner) 1.32
05. Jay Nelson: Don’t You Want A Man Like Me (Miller/Nelson) 2.02
06. The Jaguars: Ginny Ginny (Johnson/Penniman) 2.28
07. Rufus Gordon: Long Tall Sally (Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell) 2.08
08. Nat The Cool Cat: Come By Here (Andersen) 2.49
09. Juke Boy Barner: Rock With Me (Welson) 2.52
10. Prince Royals: Anna Mae (unknown) 2.42
11. Elmar Parker: You Know I Love You (Parker/Christian) 2.08
12. Eddie Alexander & The Greats: I’m In Love (Jenkins) 2.17
13. Ernie Williams: My Pretty Baby (Gordon/Williams/Web) 1.58
14. Freddie Williams & The Keynotes: Linda Lu (Sharpe) 2.55
15. Piney Brown: Sugar In My Tea (Price/Brown) 2.27
16. Jimmy McPhail: Ding Dong Babe (Harris/Francis) 2.41
17. Billy Fair & Orchestra: I’ll Be True To You (Darge/Weller) 2.20
18. Little Johnny Cook: Try Your Love (Keys/(Woods/Burton) 2.17
19. Leo Price & Band: Hey Now Baby (Price) 2.31
20. Jimmy Trotter: Hungry And Thirsty (Trotter) 1.56
21. Sonny Boy Williams: Alice Mae Blues (Williams) 2.28
22. Lenny Johnson: Walk Ginny Walk (Otis) 2.17
23. Eddie Moore: Touch Of Your Love (Johnson/Moore) 2.15
24. Hayward Lee: My Love (Lee) 2.14
25. Johnny Spain: I’m In Love (Scott/Terry) 2.33
26. Joe Boots: Squeeze Me (Boots) 2.12
27. Modest ‘Show Stopper’ Clifton: Pretty Little Baby (Clifton) 1.55
28. Frank Linkenberg: Ball Of Fire (Butler/Graham) 2.08

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Jack Teagarden – Big T´s Jazz (1956)

FrontCover1.JPGWeldon Leo “Jack” Teagarden (August 20, 1905 – January 15, 1964) was a jazz trombonist and singer. According to critic Scott Yannow of Allmusic, Teagarden was the preeminent American jazz trombone player before the bebop era of the 1940s and “one of the best jazz singers too”.[1] Teagarden’s early career was as a sideman with the likes of Tommy Dorsey, Paul Whiteman and lifelong friend Louis Armstrong before branching out as a bandleader in 1939 and specializing in New Orleans Jazz-style jazz until his death.

Born in Vernon, Texas, his brothers Charlie and Clois “Cub” and his sister Norma also became professional musicians. His father was an amateur brass band trumpeter and started him on baritone horn; by age seven he had switched to trombone. His first public performances were in movie theaters, where he accompanied his mother, a pianist.
Music career
From left: Jack Teagarden, Sandy DeSantis, Velma Middleton, Fraser MacPherson, Cozy Cole, Arvell Shaw, Earl Hines, Barney Bigard, Palomar Supper Club, Vancouver, B.C., Canada (March 17, 1951)
“‘Jack-Armstrong’ Blues” by the V-Disc All Stars, featuring Jack Teagarden and Louis Armstrong, V-Disc, U.S. War Department release, March 1945

JackTeagarden01A.jpgTeagarden’s trombone style was largely self-taught, and he developed many unusual alternative positions and novel special effects on the instrument. He is usually considered the most innovative jazz trombone stylist of the pre-bebop era – Pee Wee Russell once called him “the best trombone player in the world”[3] – and did much to expand the role of the instrument beyond the old tailgate style role of the early New Orleans brass bands. Chief among his contributions to the language of jazz trombonists was his ability to interject the blues or merely a “blue feeling” into virtually any piece of music.[citation needed]

By 1920 Teagarden was playing professionally in San Antonio, including with the band of pianist Peck Kelley. In the mid-1920s he started traveling widely around the United States in a quick succession of different bands. In 1927, he went to New York City where he worked with several bands. By 1928 he played for the Ben Pollack band.

Within a year of the commencement of his recording career, he became a regular vocalist, first doing blues material (“Beale Street Blues”, for example), and later doing popular songs. He is often mentioned as one of the best jazz vocalists of the era;[citation needed] his singing style is like his trombone playing, in much the same way that Louis Armstrong sang like he played trumpet. Teagarden’s singing is best remembered for duets with Armstrong and Johnny Mercer.

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In the late 1920s he recorded with such bandleaders and sidemen as Armstrong, Benny Goodman, Bix Beiderbecke, Red Nichols, Jimmy McPartland, Mezz Mezzrow, Glenn Miller, and Eddie Condon. Miller and Teagarden collaborated to provide lyrics and a verse to Spencer Williams’ Basin Street Blues, which in that amended form became one of the numbers that Teagarden played until the end of his days.

In the early 1930s Teagarden was based in Chicago, for some time playing with the band of Wingy Manone. He played at the Century of Progress exposition in Chicago.

Teagarden sought financial security during the Great Depression and signed an exclusive contract to play for the Paul Whiteman Orchestra from 1933 through 1938. The contract with Whiteman’s band provided him with financial security but prevented him from playing an active part in the musical advances of the mid-thirties swing era (although Teagarden and Frank Trumbauer recorded a number of small group swing classics throughout his tenure with Whiteman on Brunswick).

JackTeagarden03.jpgTeagarden then started leading his own big band. Glenn Miller wrote the song “I Swung the Election” for him and his band in 1939. In spite of Teagarden’s best efforts, the band was not a commercial success, and he was brought to the brink of bankruptcy.

In 1946 Teagarden joined Louis Armstrong’s All Stars. In late 1951 Teagarden left to again lead his own band, then co-led a band with Earl Hines, then again with a group under his own name with whom he toured Japan in 1958 and 1959.

Teagarden appeared in the movies Birth of the Blues (1941), The Strip (1951), The Glass Wall (1953), and Jazz on a Summer’s Day (1960), the latter a documentary film of the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival. He recorded for RCA Victor, Columbia, Decca, Capitol, and MGM Records.

Early in 1964 Teagarden cut short a performance in New Orleans because of ill health. He briefly visited a hospital, then was found dead in his room at the Prince Conti Motel in New Orleans on January 15. The cause of death was bronchial pneumonia, which had followed a liver ailment. He was buried in Los Angeles.

As a jazz artist he won the 1944 Esquire magazine Gold Award, was highly rated in the Metronome polls of 1937-42 and 1945, and was selected for the Playboy magazine All Star Band, 1957-60. Teagarden was the featured performer at the Newport Jazz Festival of 1957.

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In 1969, Jack Teagarden was inducted into the DownBeat Jazz Hall of Fame. He was inducted into the Big Band and Jazz Hall of Fame in 1985. Other honors have included induction in the ASCAP Jazz Wall of Fame in 2005 and inclusion in the Houston Institute for Culture’s Texas Music Hall of Fame.

Jack Teagarden’s compositions include “I’ve Got ‘It'” with David Rose, “Shake Your Hips”, “Big T Jump”, “Swingin’ on the Teagarden Gate”, “Blues After Hours”, “A Jam Session at Victor”, “It’s So Good”, “Pickin’ For Patsy” with Allan Reuss, “Texas Tea Party” with Benny Goodman, “I’m Gonna Stomp Mr. Henry Lee” with Eddie Condon, “Big T Blues”, “Dirty Dog”, “Makin’ Friends” with Jimmy McPartland, “That’s a Serious Thing”, and “‘Jack-Armstrong’ Blues” with Louis Armstrong, recorded on December 7, 1944, with the V-Disc All-Stars and released on V-Disc in March, 1945. (by wikipedia)

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Peanuts Hucko, Jack Teagarden and Jack Lesberg
at the Famous Door, New York, July 1947

And here´s a pretty good compilation of essential Jack Teagarden songs, recorded in the 40´s and 50´s of the last century.

And if you love these old fashinoed jazz tunes … you should listen to this beautiful album …. enjoy !

This album was original released in 1956. my copy is from a re-release from 1963

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Personnel:
Jack Teagarden (rombone, vocals)
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a lot of other musicians (read the backcover of this LP)

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Tracklist:
01. Persian Rug (Kahn/Moret) 2.34
02. I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues (Arlen/Koehler) 2.45
03. Love Me Or Leave Me (Donaldson/Kahn) 3.02
04. The Sheik Of Araby (Smith/Wheeler/Snyder) 3.01
05. Body And Soul (Green/Sour/Heyman/Eyton) 2.52
06. Aunt Hagar’s Blues (Handy) 3.16
07. Love Me (Washington/Young) 3.05
08. Nobody Knows The Trouble I’ve Seen (Traditional) 2.44
09. I’m Gonna Stomp Mr. Henry Lee (Condon(Teagarden/Reubens/Kelly) 2.44
10. Somebody Loves Me (Gershwin/MacDonald/DeSylva) 2.35
11. Blue River (Washington/Young) 2.48
12. Rose Of The Rio Grande (Warren/Gorman/Leslie) 2.22

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