Jack Bruce – Automatic (1983)

FrontCover1.JPGAutomatic is the eighth studio album by Scottish musician Jack Bruce, released in January 1983. It makes heavy use of the Fairlight CMI digital sampling synthesiser and Bruce is the sole performer. The album was originally only released in Germany, on the Intercord label. (by wikipedia)

Jack Bruce’s Automatic, recorded and originally released only in Germany in 1983, is an interesting LP and one that bears the distinction of being the final Bruce catalog album to be released on compact disc. It was recorded in the aftermath of a series of collaborative projects that included albums with Robin Trower, the Jan Hammer Group, and Rocket 88; the dreadful Jack Bruce and Friends album I’ve Always Wanted to Do This with Clem Clemson, Billy Cobham, and David Sancious; the beginning of his stellar collaboration with percussionist, conceptualist, and producer Kip Hanrahan; and a tour with his road band of Clemson, Bruce Gary, and Ronnie Leahy. The story is that Bruce became enamored with the Fairlight. The Fairlight was a keyboard and computer rolled into one, and was already being employed by numerous artists as a way of filling out their recordings without having to pay studio players. It was an ’80s phenomenon that is to be blamed for ruining many a record, though it is also to be credited with at least one classic: Ministry’s Twitch, produced by Adrian Sherwood, was recorded using only the Fairlight.

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The end results on Bruce’s album, however, aren’t quite so stellar. He used the device in the extreme: he played bass, harmonica, and cello and used the Fairlight for everything else. First, the positive: musically, the songs hold up. Bruce’s ballads, such as “New World,” “Traveling Child,” and “Encore” are as fine and tight as anything he’d written. The album’s opener, the reggae-influenced soul number “Make Love,” might have been a hit with different production. Bruce’s voice was in fantastic shape on the set as well, cementing his rep as one of the most instantly recognizable voices in rock. Then there’s the rest. “E. Boogie” is a dreadful attempt at computerized urban funk and sounds like a Cerrone reject. “Swarm” is perhaps what Bruce conceived of as a jazz tune (something he’s more than capable of writing with real sophistication). Because of the production, it’s simply a mess, so dense one can’t make out just what it is supposed to be. The closing tune is a blues jam with Bruce accompanying himself only on the harmonica. Though extremely brief, it feels like a breath of fresh air after the rest of Automatic. Bruce himself admits in the liners that “I’m not sure of the merits of the project itself 25 years on, but I do see it as an attempt to do something very different and worthwhile.” And that’s the caveat: this one is perhaps for those who follow Bruce’s recording career rather obsessively and can see it for what it is — a rather interesting if utterly failed experiment. (by Thom Jurek)

Tourposter1983Jack Bruce, mastermusician, composer, vocalist, made a string of brilliant solo albums in the years after Cream broke up. “Songs For A Tailor”, “Harmony Row”, “Out Of The Storm”, masterfully blending hard rock, jazz, powertrio, avantgarde. But after that his soloalbums have been a more uneven affair, mixing the splendid with the more mundane.

One album has always stood out as a masterstroke, “Automatic”. So its certainly in due time this excellent and compelling music is out on CD. Really just Jack and a lot of synths and keyboards and perhaps his strongest collection of songs ever. Bruce has always belonged to the chosen few who can write ballads that’s not clichériden or sentimental, but instead heartgripping and transcendentally beautiful. Here we get a wholesome dose of those gorgous Jack-ballads, like “The Best Is Still To Come” and “Travellin’ Child”.

Some of synth-pads may sound a bit outdated, but as a whole this is really timeless quality music. Showing – in the many details – his great musical scope, incorporating elements of jazz and classical in the proceedings. Ranging from fiery soul in “Make Love (pt.II)” to the rather wacky avantgarde of “The Swarm”. All of it sung with his trademark golden voice.

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And perhaps the finest bunch of lyrics ever from long time collaborator Pete Brown. Often hinting at the transcendental and the spiritual. (by Bodhi Heeren)

“Automatic Pilot” ends the album just Jack and his harmonica barking out
a bleak future.

An unusual, but very satisfying album by the one and onyl Jack Bruce !

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Personnel:
Jack Bruce (vocals, bass, keyboards, Fairlight CMI digital sampling synthesizer, drum programming, harmonica)

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Tracklist:
01. A Boogie 4.27
02. Uptown Breakdown 4.29
03. Travelling Child 5.12
04. New World 3.23
05. Make Love (Part II) 3.37
06. Green & Blue 5.12
07. Swarm 4.00
08. Encore 4.10
09. Automatic Pilot 1.03

Music: Jack Bruce
Lyrics: Pete Brown

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More Jack Bruce:

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Klaus Weiss Sextet – Sunbirds (1971)

FrontCover1Discovery is perhaps the single most pleasurable feature that awaits the prog enthusiast, similar perhaps to the wine lover who is in constant search for a new vintage, a fresh varietal to quench his thirst. Because of the vast array of sub genres, there is a seemingly limitless treasure trove of unknown albums that lie hidden barely beneath the sand, waiting to be unearthed. Such is the case with the multi-national Sunbirds, a gift from my pal Mellotron Storm who ignited my curiosity with his review (isn’t that the real purpose of this site?) and the find is curiously attractive, as I am currently in a heavy jazz-rock-fusion mode (happens often in winter) with arrivals of the first 4 Nucleus albums and Isotope’s Gary Boyle, all to be reviewed imminently. Just like with a sunken cache, the jewel is tarnished only by time and in fact, only glows brighter than ever before with each listen. The first comment remains concretely evident in that the early 70s were nothing more than a giant organic laboratory of experimentation with a huge arsenal of modern instruments for the time, electric piano, synths and treated electric guitars, all conspiring to alter the limits of jazz by providing a solid rock backbone.

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There is nothing more pleasing than the e-piano, the celebrated Fender Rhodes in particular and this debut has endless cascades of the glorious keyboard within its grooves, here played by Fritz Pauer . Belgian guitarist Phillip Catherine sizzles fiercely when called upon which is often and the delectable flute also has a predominant role. This is groove music par excellence, an all-instrumental blitz that powers forward with reptilian efficiency, urbane at some moments and galactically spacey at others. On “Sunshine”, Catherine palpitates brilliantly within the confines of a sweltering mass of trippy notes, while on the scintillating “Kwaeli” the flute and bass enjoy a slow dance of loving embrace, as American jazz stalwart Jimmy Woode lays down a fierce bass furrow that burrows deeply into the psyche, the guitar hovering over the entity with bold confidence, sounding like much very early Santana.

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When the e-piano enters the fray, well?.wow! You have to marvel at the deft musicianship. That perceivable Latin flavor is proven by the “Spanish Sun” track, perhaps even the highlight piece here, sounding like some soundtrack to a 70s American movie filmed in San Francisco, breezy, trippy, groovy and all the cool words used back then apply. The riffling rhythm guitar is simply superb, whilst the flute dances above the fray with manic delicacy, propelled by Klaus Weiss’ spontaneous drumming. “Blues for D.S.” just keeps glowing cheerfully, the bass and drums setting down a crawling groove on which the soloists can evoke sensational sequences of sounds that seeks out the most far-flung expanses without becoming cheesy. The rumbling organ does well in inspiring the simmering pot effect. “Sunrise” like the title suggests is vivacious, funky, playful and gently intense. The mood is super-cool and Catherine’s playing style explains why he replaced Jan Akkerman in latter day Focus, loads of “flick o the wrist” riffs abound , rekindling images of the jam tracks off Focus “3” album. The finale is called “Fire Dance” and once again, the onus is on heat and shimmer, with the axe blasting forth with relish (and mustard!) , the groove shining bright and you can imagine the smile on the musicians faces as this simmers to an end. Incredible music.

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Some may slimily claim that this is very dated and has no context by today’s standards but we are dealing with an ancient musical artifact that is essentially timeless. Hey, Miles Davis, Mozart, Bach and countless others still thrill to the gills, so why not the Sunbirds? This is a tremendous recording that has a distinctive place in the prog heritage. Thanks, John via Greg Walker (networking works!). In terms of prog academia, if you ever wanted to get into an electric piano orgy, look no further! (by tszirmay)

Listen and you´ll hear timeless music !!! This is a hyptnotic album, believe me !

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Personnel:
Philip Catherine (guitar)
Fritz Pauer (piano)
Ferdinand Povel (saxophone, flute)
Juan Romero (percussion)
Klaus Weiss (drums)
Jimmy Woode (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Kwaeli (Catherine) 3.44
02. Sunrise (Pauer) 5.35
03. Spanish Sun (Povel/Pauer/Woode/Weiss/Catherine) 12.17
04. Sunshine (Pauer) 6.54
05. Sunbirds (Pauer) 9.41
06. Blues For D.S. (Woode) 8.01
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07. Dreams (Weiss/Woode/Pauer/Povel/Catherine) 9.42
07. Fire Dance (Pauer) 6.51
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Pat Metheny Group – Spealing Of Now (2002)

FrontCover1.jpgSpeaking of Now is an album by the Pat Metheny Group, released in 2002 by Warner Bros. It marks the first appearances of Group members Antonio Sánchez, who replaced Paul Wertico on drums, and multi-instrumentalist Cuong Vu. A veteran of the avant-garde jazz scene and an admirer of both Pat Metheny and the Group, Vu was approached by the bandleader to join; Metheny had been very impressed with recordings of Vu’s trumpet playing and vocal abilities.

Cameroonian musician Richard Bona also participated in the album’s recording and tour, the latter of which particularly showcased his abilities on vocals and bass guitar.

In 2003, as part of the album’s promotion, a concert was recorded in Japan and released on DVD and the Group performed on the PBS series Austin City Limits. (by wikipedia)

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Speaking of Now finds guitarist Metheny leading a retooled Pat Metheny Group; in addition to longtime core members, keyboardist Lyle Mays and bassist Steve Rodby, the Group now includes drummer Antonio Sanchez, trumpeter/vocalist Cuong Vu, and Richard Bona, who’s best known as a bassist, but who functions primarily as the Group’s percussionist/vocalist. The result is an exquisite album that features fresh new musical perspectives while losing none of the Group’s familiar wide-ranging, melodic, always accessible sound. Most of the tracks on Speaking of Now were composed by Metheny and his longtime collaborator Mays, although three tracks were composed solely by Metheny.

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There’s a buoyant feel to this album that is not to be confused with lightness. This is complex, intricately detailed music that reveals additional layers with each listening. Metheny seems to delight in discovering the myriad means by which his prodigiously accomplished bandmembers can provide coloration to the compositions, both within the larger group and in solo spotlights. Sanchez’s rhythmic agility and sensitivity is featured throughout, particularly on “The Gathering Sky,” which begins as a sparkling, piano-led number and then transforms into a grooving band jam. One of the album’s many solo highlights comes during “Proof,” where Vu turns in a poignantly lyrical trumpet solo that is followed by an electrifying, steadily intensifying solo by Mays. Vocals have long been part of the Metheny Group sound, but now he is utilizing them in new ways; “Another Life” opens with Bona and Vu harmonizing on a chorale that leads into the artist’s delicate acoustic guitar work, while Bona provides sweet vocalizing over Metheny’s guitar on the beautiful, soaring “You.” Every track on Speaking of Now possesses a distinct beauty and eloquence. This is a superb offering that is not to be missed. (by Lucy Tauss)

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Personnel:
Richard Bona (vocals, percussion, guitar, bass)
Lyle Mays (keyboards)
Pat Metheny (guitar, guitar synthesizer)
Steve Rodby (bass, cello)
Antonio Sánchez (drums)
Cuong Vu (trumpet, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. As It Is (Metheny/Mays) 7.40
02. Proof (Metheny/Mays) 10.13
03. Another Life (Metheny) 7.08
04. The Gathering Sky (Metheny/Mays) 9.22
05. You (Metheny) 8.24
06. On Her Way (Metheny/Mays) 6.04
07. A Place In The World (Metheny/Mays) 9.52
08. Afternoon (Metheny) 4.43
09. Wherever You Go (Metheny/Mays) 8.04

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The Mahavishnu Orchestra – The Inner Mounting Flame (1971)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Inner Mounting Flame is the debut studio album by multinational jazz-rock fusion band Mahavishnu Orchestra, released in August 1971 by Columbia Records. After their formation, the group performed several debut gigs before they entered the studio to record their first album featuring all original material written by guitarist John McLaughlin.

This is the album that made John McLaughlin a semi-household name, a furious, high-energy, yet rigorously conceived meeting of virtuosos that, for all intents and purposes, defined the fusion of jazz and rock a year after Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew breakthrough. It also inadvertently led to the derogatory connotation of the word fusion, for it paved the way for an army of imitators, many of whose excesses and commercial panderings devalued the entire movement. Though much was made of the influence of jazz-influenced improvisation in the Mahavishnu band, it is the rock element that predominates, stemming directly from the electronic innovations of Jimi Hendrix. The improvisations, particularly McLaughlin’s post-Hendrix machine-gun assaults on double-necked electric guitar and Jerry Goodman’s flights on electric violin, owe more to the freakouts that had been circulating in progressive rock circles than to jazz, based as they often are on ostinatos on one chord.

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These still sound genuinely thrilling today, as McLaughlin and Goodman battle Jan Hammer’s keyboards, Rick Laird’s bass, and especially Billy Cobham’s hard-charging drums, whose jazz-trained technique pushed the envelope for all rock drummers. What doesn’t date so well are the composed medium- and high-velocity unison passages that are played in such tight lockstep that they can’t breathe. There is also time out for quieter, reflective numbers that are drenched in studied spirituality (“A Lotus on Irish Streams”) or irony (“You Know You Know”); McLaughlin was to do better in that department with less-driven colleagues elsewhere in his career. Aimed with absolute precision at young rock fans, this record was wildly popular in its day, and it may have been the cause of more blown-out home amplifiers than any other record this side of Deep Purple. (by Richard S. Ginell)

What a line-up !

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Personnel:
Billy Cobham (drums, percussion)
Jerry Goodman (violin)
Jan Hammer (keyboards)
Rick Laird (bass)
John McLaughlin (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Meeting Of The Spirits 6:52
02. Dawn 5.15
03. The Noonward Race 6.29
04. A Lotus On Irish Streams 5.41
05. Vital Transformation 6.16
06. The Dance Of Maya 7.17
07. You Know You Know 5.07
08. Awakening 3.28

Music composed by John McLaughlin

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Brian Auger´s Oblivion Express – Same (1971)

FrontCover1.jpgAfter the last throes of Trinity, Brian decided to form a new band from scratch and allow for more instrumental space in his music. And what a departure this was from the Trinity days. Here the music took a more severe turn away from his previous sound while remaining accessible, but being much more energetic as well and combined jazz and rock even further. With Dean and McIntosh as a solid rhythm section, Brian had to look for a guitarist that wouldn’t be tempted to overdo his own antics on the keyboards and eventually he chose Jim Mullen. With the artwork depicting our favourite Ogre unleashing his Oblivion Express out of his chest and straight into your face and ears, it’s easy to see that Brian is the boss with the majority of the compositions to his name. It wouldn’t be the case every time as the following Better Land (but much poorer album) is mostly penned by Mullen.

Opening on the fantastic McLaughlin’s Dragon Song, Brian’s crew is out for your throat and eardrums tight from the starting blocks, with Brian unleashing all hell from his Hammond, while Mullen backs him up quite complementarily. On the 11-mins+ Total Eclipse, however, I find that they over-stretched a bit too much the track duration: the rhythm section finds the groove almost instantly and go on to maintain for the full duration, allowing lengthy solos from Mullen and Auger. At the start of the track, Auger changes from piano to organ to electric piano, but later seem unfortunately to get his finger stuck on his Hammond. The hard-driving jazz-rock The Light gives us a chance to hear Brian’s voice, which is apt, but he’s strongly helped out by Dean and Mullen in the chorus. The track strolls on 100 MPH on the Hammond Express before fading out electronically a bit too early only to come back and add further electronics death throes.

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On the flipside, Brian shows his vocal limits (and lyrical ideas all the same) with the up-tempoed On The Road, Mullen’s guitar sizzling in its middle section with our Ogre’s organ covering him from all sides. Another up-tempoed Sword has some Purple accents, especially coming from Lord’s many chord changes rather than Blackmore’s metallic riffs, Mullen’s play remaining less chunky (thankfully) than Ritchie’s. This leaves us with the anthemic eponymous track, where Brian shows that, vocals excepted, he feared nothing from crunchier guitar-lead groups. Again very much in the line of what Jon Lord would do, Brian changes chords constantly, allowing Mullen boulevards to expand and exploding his organ into saturation and leaving you the fan to lift the needle back onto that slice of wax.

Certainly one of the better hard Hammond-driven rock albums coming out of the early 70’s from England, BA’s OE is a 100 MPH album that gives no rest, bar in the longer groove of Total Eclipse. Indeed Brian’s train is one jazzier than Jon Lord’s Purple tram, but than again the tram would show more regularity in the long run and gather much more success. Definitely very close to a five star, but not quite partly because of their main weakness, the vocals. (by Seane Trane)

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Personnel:
Brian Auger (keyboards, vocals)
Barry Dean (bass, background vocals)
Robbie McIntosh (drums)
Jim Mullen (guitar, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Dragon Song (McLaughlin) 4.30
02. Total Eclipse (Ball) 11.38
03. The Light (Auger) 4.24
04. On The Road (Auger/Mullen) 5.25
05. The Sword (Auger) 6.36
06. Oblivion Express (Auger) 7.45

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Brian Auger and The Trinity and Julie Driscoll – Streetnoise (1969)

FrontCover1Streetnoise is a 1969 album by Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger and the Trinity, originally released as a double LP.

It includes cover versions of The Doors’ “Light My Fire”, Nina Simone’s “Take Me To The Water”, Laura Nyro’s “Save the Country”, Miles Davis’ “All Blues”, Richie Havens’ “Indian Rope Man”, and “Let The Sunshine In” and “I Got Life” from the musical Hair. Driscoll covers this wide range of musical influences easily and with her highly emotive and distinctive vocals, and with Auger’s intense Hammond organ, the album is instrumentally interesting, too. (by wikipedia)

The final collaboration between singer Julie Driscoll (by that time dubbed as “The Face” by the British music weeklies) and Brian Auger’s Trinity was 1969’s Streetnoise — it was an association that had begun in 1966 with Steampacket, a band that also featured Rod Stewart and Long John Baldry. As a parting of the ways, however, it was Trinity’s finest moment. A double album featuring 16 tracks, more than half with vocals by Driscoll, the rest absolutely burning instrumentals by Trinity. (Auger on keyboards and vocals, Driscoll on acoustic guitar, Clive Thacker on drums, and Dave Ambrose on bass and guitars.) “Tropic of Capricorn,” an instrumental Auger original, kicks off in high gear.

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It’s a knotty prog rock number that contains elements of Memphis R&B. it sounds better than it reads; it twists and turns around a minor key figure that explodes into solid, funky grit with Thacker double timing the band. Driscoll enters next with “Czechoslovakia,” a wide-open modal tune that hints at the kinds of music she would explore in the very near future on her debut 1969 and later, with future husband Keith Tippett. Broken melody lines and drones are the framework for Driscoll to climb over and soar above, and she does without faltering before she slides into the traditional gospel tune, “Take Me to the Water.” And this is how this record moves, from roiling progressive rock instrumentals and art songs, done rock style, to inspired readings of the hits of the day such as “Light My Fire,” “Flesh Failures (Let the Sunshine In)” from Hair, and one of most stirring readings ever of Laura Nyro’s “Save the Country” that closes the album. “Indian Rope Man,” is a burning, organ-driven churner that fuses Stax/Volt R&B funkiness with psychedelic rock and jazz syncopation.

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Driscoll’s vocal is over the top; she’s deep into the body of the tune and wrings from it every ounce of emotion from it. Auger’s organ solo is a barnburner; reeling in the high register, he finds the turnarounds and offers his own counterpoint in the middle and lower one with fat chords. The rhythm section keeps the groove, funking it up one side and moving it out to the ledge until the coda. Another steaming rocker is “Ellis Island,” with it’s dueling Fender Rhodes and organ lines. it may be the finest instrumental on the album. “Looking in the Eye of the World” features Driscoll in rare form, singing in her voice’s lower register accompanied only by Auger’s piano on a blues moan worthy of Nina Simone. Streetnoise was a record that may have been informed by its era, but it certainly isn’t stuck there, especially in the 21st century. The music sounds as fresh and exciting as the day it was recorded. This is a must-have package for anyone interested in the development of Auger’s music that was to change immediately with the invention of the Oblivion Express, and also for those interested in Driscoll’s brave, innovative, and fascinating career as an improviser, who discovered entirely new ways of using the human voice. Streetnoise is brilliant. (by by Thom Jurek)

In other words: One of most important albums from the Sixties !

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Personnel:
David “Lobs” Ambrose (bass, guitar, vocals)
Brian “Auge” Auger (keyboards, vocals)
Julie “Jools” Driscoll (vocals, guitar)
Clive “Toli” Thacker (drums, percussion)

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Tracklist:

HOW GOOD WOULD IT BE TO FEEL FREE:
01. Tropic Of Capricorn (Auger) 5.30
02. Czechoslovakia (Driscoll) 6.45
03. Take Me To The Water (Simone) 4.00
04. A Word About Colour (Driscoll) 1.35

KISS HIM QUICK, HE HAS TO PART:
05. Light My Fire (Densmore/Krieger/Manzarek/Morrison) 4.30
06. Indian Rope Man (Havens/Price/Roth) 3.00
07. When I Was Young (Traditional/Driscoll) 7.00
08. The Flesh Failures (Let the Sunshine In) (Rado/Ragni/MacDermot) 3.05

LOOKING IN THE EYE OF THE WORLD:
09. Ellis Island (Auger) 4.10
10. In Search Of The Sun (Ambrose) 4.25
11. Finally Found You Out (Auger) 4.15
12. Looking In The Eye Of The World (Auger) 5.05

SAVE THE COUNTRY:
13. Vauxhall To Lambeth Bridge (Driscoll) 6.30
14. All Blues (Davis/Brown) 5.40
15. I’ve Got Life (Rado/Ragni/MacDermot) 4.30
16. Save The Country (Nyro) 3,56

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Jan Akkerman – Fromage a trois (2006)

FrontCover1Jan Akkerman (born 24 December 1946) is a Dutch guitarist. He first found international commercial success with the band Focus, which he co-founded with Thijs van Leer. After leaving Focus, he continued as a solo artist, adding jazz fusion influences.

And here is a very rare Jan Akkerman CD with a limited edition of 500. It was recorded on Jan’s 2005/6 ‘Fromage a Trois’ theatre tour in Holland and subsequently sold on his UK tour in February 2006.

This is a genuine Jan Akkerman CD …
… it is one of a LIMITED EDITION factory pressing of 500 recorded and mixed by Jan’s sound engineer, Neil Denholm, on the 2005/2006 Dutch ‘Fromage a Trois’ theatre tour and later pressed and released by Jan to sell as merchandise on his early 2006 UK tour. Reference to the CD can be found on Jan’s official website.

There are also various references to the item if you go back through Jan’s guestbook to around Feb 2006. Jan’s previous ‘limited edition’ release (LMM-8) was entitled ‘I’m in the Mood’ and was sold on his 2005 UK tour. ‘Fromage a Trois’ has the catalogue number LMM-9 and continues the tradition of excellent limited edition releases such as ‘Live at the Priory’ and ‘Live at Alexanders’. When promoting the CD on stage in Wolverhampton, Jan quipped that all should buy it as it will be worth a fortune on eBay! (focuscollection.com)

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Personnel:
Jan Akkerman (guitar)
Marijn van den Berg (drums)
Wilbrand Meischke (bass)
Coen Molenaar (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Hymne A L’amour (Akkerman) 4.25
02 Time After Time (Akkerman) 5.05
03. That Dream (Akkerman) 11.35
04. The Zebrah (Muleta/Rosenberg) 7.40
05. Sweet Sue (Akkerman) 5.14
06. Between The Sheets (E.Isley/M.Isley/Jasper/R.Isley/O.Isley/R.Isley) 9.25
07. Cottonbay (Muleta) 8.45
08. Hocus Pocus (US version) (v.Leer/Akkerman) 5.37

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