Didier Lockwood – Live In Montreux (1990)

FrontCover1Noted French jazz violinist Didier Lockwood, a disciple of the late Stephane Grappelli, has died of a heart attack in Paris, his agent said.

Lockwood, who turned 62 on February 11, died early on Sunday morning. The night before his death, he had performed at Paris jazz venue Bal Blomet.

“His wife, his three daughters, his family, his agent, his co-workers and his record label are sad to announce the sudden passing of Didier Lockwood,” his agent said in a statement.

Lockwood was playing at a jazz festival when he met Grappelli, another French jazz great who founded a string quintet called the Hot Club of France in 1934 with gypsy guitar legend Django Reinhardt.

The violinist invited the then 20-year-old Lockwood to join him on a European tour, kicking off an international career in which he gave around 4,500 concerts and released more than 35 records.

“That was the start of my career, the launchpad that got me into the world of popular jazz,” Lockwood told Radio France in 2008.

DidierLockwood03Lockwood was committed to music education, in 2001 setting up the Didier Lockwood Music Centre in a town south of Paris teaching improvisation according to a jazz violin method he developed.

French culture minister Francoise Nyssen described Lockwood as “deeply generous and outgoing” and said he would be missed by “his friends, music and all the children he wished to enlighten with his passion”.

“He wanted to make music without borders or prejudices,” she added.
(L) Didier Lockwood performs with colleagues

Born in 1956 in Calais to a French-Scottish family, Lockwood, whose father was a music teacher, gained an early taste for improvisation thanks to his elder brother Francis, a jazz pianist.

Aged 17, Lockwood joined a popular French prog rock band called Magma. He later threw himself into a multitude of musical projects and collaborations, experimenting with varied jazz styles, both electric and acoustic, from classical fusion to gypsy swing.

During his career, he wrote two operas, violin and piano concertos, lyrical works and music for films and cartoons.

“France has lost an exceptional musician, a man with rare qualities,” wrote violinist Renaud Capucon on Twitter.

Lockwood’s widow is the coloratura soprano Patricia Petibon, acclaimed for her interpretations of French Baroque music.

The couple had just recorded an album together, said Lockwood’s agent Christophe Deghelt, who called him “Mr. 100,000 volts” and said the musician had a “huge” number of projects under way when he died.

Lockwood was previously married to the singer Caroline Casadesus, with whom he had created a musical called “Jazz and the diva”.(by The Independent)

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“After Stephane Grappelli and Jean-Luc Ponty, France now has a third great violin player, His name is Didier Lockwood.” (Liberation, Paris). Besides Grapelli and Ponty, Lockwood’s influences include Polish violinist Zbigniew Seifert, John Coltrane, and Frank Zappa. Born in 1956, Lockwood was classically trained, but moved on to rock-inspired jazz at an early age. He followed in Ponty’s fusion footsteps with the use of the electric violin, taking it one step further by experimenting in extending the sounds of the violin.

The 1980 Live in Montreux presents Didier Lockwood at his fusion best. He has multi-Grammy winner Jan Hammer (Mahavishnu Orchestra, music for Miami Vice) along for the ride, as well as the intense, soulful American saxophonist Bob Malach. On Fast Travel, the group performs up-tempo musical legerdemain as first Malach, then Hammer, and finally Lockwood pull out their bag of tricks.

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Flyin’ Kitten radiates a bouncy melodic rock-inflected ambiance, while Ballade des Fees portrays a haunting, wispy fairytale. With its infectiously gamboling 2-beat feel, there’s a folkish quality to Zebulon Dance; Lockwood’s plucked violin and Hammer’s guitar-like synth explorations are highlights. Four Strings Bitch shows off the violin’s willful eccentricities in a virtuoso one-man performance that ventures from classic and bluesy acoustic play on through to electronic experimentation.” (unknown source)

Listen to “Four Strings Bitch”: A masteroiece for the elctric violin !

All in all: a sensational album !

Recorded in the Casino Montreux July 16, 1980 and Mountain Recording Studio Montreux.
Mixed in the MPS Studio Villingen July 28, 29, 30, 1980. 

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Personnel:
Gerry Brown (drums)
Jan Hammer (synthesizer)
Didier Lockwood (violin)
Bob Malach (saxophone)
Marc Perru (guitar)
Bo Stief (bass)

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Tracklist:
01 Fast Travel (Lockwood) 7.15
02. Flyin’ Kitten (Lockwood) 7.43
03 Ballade des Fees (Lockwood) 5.01
04. Zebulon Dance (Lockwood) 3.58
05. ADGC (Lockwood) 5:46
06. Four Strings Bitch (Lockwood)3:45
07. Turtle Shuffle (Kajdan) 8.37

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Didier Lockwood (11 February 1956 – 18 February 2018)

Rest In Peace !

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John McLaughlin & Carlos Santana – Live In Chicago (1973)

FrontCover1Recorded after their collaboration, this recording has appeared under different facets (as have many of Santana’s records) sometimes as a single disc, some others as a double, covering the entire concert. The major difference in the line-up is that Billy Cobham holds the drum stool instead of Shrieve on the studio album.

As you’d expect, such an improvisational studio album could only give out an even more improvised and extended version of those songs. Indeed extended wailing soaring & searing guitar solos, extended drums and percussion duos, and many more indulgent musical traits are all part of this album. Particularly enjoyable is the Coltrane track Naima that gets a brilliant interpretation, but does indeed stray a little away from the original. All four tracks are very interesting but not fundamentally different that on the studio album.

In general the sound quality is acceptable, although I’ve heard some different quality in different versions, you can bet that some non-legit ones are most likely least likely to be proper-sounding. The opening minutes of Live Divine are not always well recorded because of the extreme dynamics of the band on stage. The Jazz-Door label (German) version (JD 1250) has a satisfactory sound and should please many fans. (by Sean Trane)

This is the edition from the legendary “Oh Boy” Label (Luxembourg/Europe)

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Personnel:
Billy Cobham (drums)
John McLaughlin (guitar)
Armando Peraza (percussion)
Doug Rauch (bass)
Carlos Santana (guitar)
Larry Young (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Flame Sky (McLaughlin/Rauch/Santana) 16.02
02. Let’s Us Go Into The House Of The Lord (Smith/Sanders/Traditional) 26.02
03. The Life Divine (McLaughlin) 17.16
04. A Love Supreme (Coltrane) 19.02
05. Follow Your Heart (McLauglin) 26.50
06. Naima (Coltrane) 5.41

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Al Kooper – You Never Know Who Your Friends Are (1969)

FrontCover1You Never Know Who Your Friends Are is the second solo album by American multi-instrumentalist Al Kooper, issued in 1969 on Columbia Records.

Kooper wasted no time recording this album, coming just seven months after his debut release. It is a continuation of sorts of his debut; the album contains another eclectic mix of rock, rhythm and blues, jazz, pop, and blues, though without the psychedelics that had somewhat permeated through I Stand Alone. Utilizing a large group of musicians under the direction of Charlie Calello, known collectively as “The Al Kooper Big Band”, Kooper also strayed away from the heavy string orchestrations of his debut.

Relying on more original compositions, with nine of twelve tracks by Kooper, and the remaining three by Harry Nilsson and Motown Records staff songwriters, the album further helped to cement Kooper’s reputation. The album reached #125 on the Billboard 200 on October 25, 1969, and was on the charts for six weeks. (by wikipedia)

AlKooper02Al Kooper’s second solo album is a bit more uneven than its predecessor, I Stand Alone, for understandable reasons — it would have been nothing less than a miracle for Kooper to have matched the consistency and daring of that album, and he doesn’t have quite the same array of memorable tunes here. He’s still ranging freely, however, through pop, jazz, R&B, and soul, with some songs that are among the most glorious of his output. “Magic in My Sock” is a good enough opener, making up in its virtuoso horn parts and guitar for what it lacks in melodic invention; “Lucille” is hardly the best ballad that Kooper has ever written, but it forms a good bridge to “Too Busy Thinkin’ About My Baby,” a Motown cover that’s one of the highlights of Kooper’s entire output — from a black singer this track would be a priceless gem, but coming from Kooper it’s extraordinary in its every nuance. You get some blues instrumental (principally piano-based) and an abortive but entertaining effort at pop/rock with the title tune, and then Kooper plunges into arty balladry with the hauntingly beautiful “The Great American Marriage/Nothing.” He goes back into Motown territory, just as successful as before, on “I Don’t Know Why I Love You,” and back to moody art-song with Harry Nilsson’s “Mourning Glory Story.” Kooper returns to the soulful side of rock on “Anna Lee (What Can I Do for You)” and finishes with “I’m Never Gonna Let You Down” — the latter would be worth the price of the album by itself, a soaring, more lyrical and moody original classic that manages to be unpretentious yet epic in its treatment. by Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Ralph Casale (guitar)
Eric Gale (guitar)
Paul Griffin (keyboards)
Ernie Hayes (keyboards)
Jerry Jemmott (bass)
Al Kooper (keyboards, guitar, ondioline, vocals)
John Miller (bass)
Frank Owens (keyboards)
“Pretty” Purdie (drums)
Chuck Rainey (bass)
Al Rodgers (drums)
Stu Scharf (guitar)
Walter Sears (synthesizer)
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trumpet:
Bernie Glow – Ernie Royal – Marvin Stamm

trombone:
Ray Desio – Jimmy Knepper – Bill Watrous – Tony Studd

saxophone:
George Young – Sol Schlinger – Seldon Powell – Joe Farrell

background vocals:
Hilda Harris – Connie Zimet – Albertine Harris – Lois Winter – Mike Gately – Lou Christie – Robert John – Charlie Calello

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Tracklist:
01. Magic In My Socks (Kooper) 3,57
02. Lucille )Kooper) 3.29
03. Too Busy Thinkin’ ’bout My Baby (Whitfield/Bradford) 3.24
04. First Time Around (Kooper) 2.52
05. Loretta (Union Turnpike Eulogy) (Kooper) 3.51
06. Blues, Part IV (Blues) 5.08
07. You Never Know Who Your Friends Are (Kooper) 2.56
08. The Great American Marriage / Nothing (Kooper) 4.51
09. I Don’t Know Why I Love You (Hardaway/Hunter/Riser/Wonder) 3.25
10. Mourning Glory Story (Nilsson) 2.19
11. Anna Lee (What Can I Do for You) (Kooper) 3.20
12. I’m Never Gonna Let You Down (Kooper) 4.38

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Ginger Baker & Jonas Hellborg – Neuried (1988)

FrontCover1In the 80´s & 90´s I was a real serious audience tape collector and I had contact with many other maniac collectors of rare audience tapes.

So here´s one of these tapes, recorded live with two very fine musicians:

Ginger Baker & Jonas Hellborg:

Peter Edward “Ginger” Baker (born 19 August 1939) is an English drummer, best known as the founder of the rock band Cream. His work in the 1960s earned him praise as “rock’s first superstar drummer,” although his individual style melded a jazz background with his interest in African rhythms. Baker is credited as a pioneer of drumming in genres like jazz fusion, heavy metal and world music.

Baker began playing drums at age 15 around 1954, and later took lessons from Phil Seamen. In the 1960s, he joined Blues Incorporated, where he met bassist Jack Bruce. The two clashed often, but would be rhythm section partners again in the Graham Bond Organisation and Cream, the latter of which Baker co-founded with Eric Clapton in 1966. Cream achieved worldwide success but only lasted until 1968, in part due to Baker’s and Bruce’s volatile relationship. After briefly working with Clapton in Blind Faith and leading Ginger Baker’s Air Force, Baker spent several years in the 1970s living and recording in Africa, often with Fela Kuti, in pursuit of his long-time interest in African music.[3] Among Baker’s other collaborations are his work with Gary Moore, Masters of Reality, Public Image Ltd, Atomic Rooster, Bill Laswell, jazz bassist Charlie Haden, jazz guitarist Bill Frisell, and another personally led effort, Ginger Baker’s Energy.

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Baker’s drumming attracted attention for his style, showmanship, and use of two bass drums instead of the conventional one. In his early days, he performed lengthy drum solos, most notably in the Cream song “Toad”, one of the earliest recorded examples in rock music. Baker is an inductee of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Cream, of the Modern Drummer Hall of Fame in 2008, and of the Classic Drummer Hall of Fame in 2016 (by wikipedia)

Jonas Hellborg (born 7 June 1958) is a Swedish bass guitarist. He has collaborated with John McLaughlin, Ustad Sultan Khan, Fazal Qureshi, Bill Laswell, Shawn Lane, Jens Johansson, Anders Johansson, Ginger Baker, Michael Shrieve, V. Selvaganesh, Jeff Sipe, Mattias IA Eklundh, Public Image Ltd, and Buckethead. (by wikipedia)

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And here´s not only a very rare audience tape from a concert in 1988, but a real superb audience recording from this concert.

Let´s talk about the freedom of music … and you´ll hear the magic of jamming … including two Hendrix compositions …

Enjoy the music

Recorded live at Neuried, June 27, 1988

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Personnel:
Ginger Baker (drums)
Jonas Hellborg (bass)
André Louis (keyboards, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Intro Jam (Baker/Hellborg/Louis) 13.46
02. Who Knows (Hendrix) 9.47
03. Instrumental (1) (Baker/Hellborg/Louis)
04. Little Wing (Hendrix) 21.58
05. Sunshine Of Your Love (Bruce/Clapton) +  Instrumental (2) (Baker/Hellborg/Louis) 13.28
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06. Ginger Baker & Jonas Hellborg – Neuried (1988) (uncut version – part 1) 38.42
07. Ginger Baker & Jonas Hellborg – Neuried (1988) (uncut version – part 2)

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Pete York Percussion Band – Same (1972)

FrontCover1After the split of “Hardin & York” Pete York formed his first own Group, The Pete York Percussion Band …

“By 1972 Pete York’s Percussion Band had hit the road. It featured a brass section and three drummers as well as guitarist/singer Miller Anderson. Occasional guest drummers in this adventure were Ian Paice, Keef Hartley, Roy Dyke and Keith Moon.” (as told by Pete York).

But for this studio recordings he jammed with old friends from the Birminham jazz-scene … and the album was co-produced by Ian Paice from Deep Purple, an old friend of Pete York.

Bill Coleman played a few years earlier with Kenny Ball,

And they Play during these days of Prog-Rock an great old fashioned jazz Album with lot´s of drums and percussion (of Course) and a real string brass section.

One hightlight is a ten Minute jam “Sombrero Sam ” (written by Charles Lloyd).

Another highlight is a classical jazz Version of “The Arrival Of The Queen Of Sheba” (written by the German baroque composer George Frideric (or Frederick) Handel) … Great !

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A few months later Pete Yorks Percussion band recorded a great concert for the “BBC In Concert” series featuring Ian Paice and Jon Lord … you will hear this Show very soon in this blog.

10 yearts later, Pete York formed another jazz Group, called “Pete York´s New York” (see here) and he played again with Mel Thorpe and Roger Munns ,,,

I guess, this is one of the rarest Pete York recordings and it´s real good one!

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Personnel:
Bill Coleman (bass, e-piano)
Steve Fearn (guitar, vocals)
Roger Munns (piano, trombone, clarinet)
Barry Sutton (trumpet)
Mel Thorpe (saxophone, flute, clarinet)
Gordon Williamson (drums, percussion)
Pete York (drums, percussion)
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Ian Paice (Percussion on 04.)

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Tracklist:
01. Keep On Running (Edwards) 2.39
02. Nothing Yet (Munns) 3.28
A3 Cold Night In The City (Fearn) 2.06
04. Sombrero Sam (Lloyd) 10.11
05. Mel’s Blues (Thorpe) 2.54
06. Moleshawk (Coleman) 3.55
07. Stroke (Coleman) 3.49
08. The Arrival Of The Queen Of Sheba (Händel) 2.43
09. Points (Munns) 4.00
10. Over (Fearn) 2.37LabelB1.jpg*
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Harvey Mandel – Baby Batter (1971)

OriginalFrontCover1Along with Christo Redentor, his best album full of great instrumental guit man prowess. He really is an unheralded great guitar player, up there with the best. Harvey’s records may give us a good jumping off point, but his best work is probably captured in a live setting, where you can hear his amazing searing sound. A true instrumental guitarist, maybe he hasn’t found a voice like Bob Hite’s, from his days with Canned Heat , and the great work on albums like Future Blues . (by Oswego)

” Baby Batter ” is a very unheralded platter by a great lead guitarist. Harvey Mandel can pick it with most of the great guitar slingers of that era. This vinyl is full of real smooth cool jazz rock. The B side is the better side but the whole recording is top notch blues guitar. (by rod45)

Legendary unsung guitar hero, owner of a extremely personal technique, an instantly recognisable sound and highly influential on ANY guitar player in 70’s/80’s. Even if all his albums are patchy I’ve choose this one, for some reason my favourite Harvey Mandel LP. All three tracks in side B are simply unbeliable, full of crawling snakey Leslie-guitar solos. (by metaxa)

In other words: another milestone in the history of the great Harvey Mandel !

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Personnel:
Colin Bailey (drums)
Big Black (percussion)
Paul Lagos (drums)
Harvey Mandel (guitar)
Mike Melvoin (keyboards)
Larry Taylor (bass)
Howard Wales (keyboards)
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Sandra Crouch (tambourine on 01. + 02.)
Joe Picaro (percussion on 06.)
Emil Richards (percussion on 03. + 07.)

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Tracklist:
01. Baby Batter 3.45
02. Midnight Sun 6.15
03. One Way Street 4.20
04. Morton Grove MaMa 4.53
05. Freedom Ball 6.15
06. El Stinger 7.15
07. Hank The Ripper 5.11

All songs written by Harvey Mandel

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Blood, Sweat & Tears – Child Is Father To The Man (1968)

FrontCover1Child Is Father to the Man is the debut album by Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in February 1968. It reached number 47 on Billboard’s Pop Albums chart in the United States.

 

A teenaged Al Kooper went to a concert for jazz trumpeter Maynard Ferguson in 1960. Ferguson’s performance served as the catalyst to start a rock band with a horn section. Originally in a band called The Blues Project, Kooper left after the band leader rejected his idea of bringing in a horn section. He then left for the West Coast and found bassist Jim Fielder who believed in the songs that Kooper wrote. Though Kooper had big ideas for his next project, he didn’t have the money to bring his ideas to fruition. He then threw a benefit for himself and invited several musicians he previously worked with, such as Judy Collins, Simon & Garfunkel, David Blue, Eric Andersen and Richie Havens. All of the performances were sold out, which led Kooper to believe that the gigs helped him. Unfortunately, the owner of the Au Go Go added numerous expenses to the gross receipts that the net receipts after the performance wasn’t enough to get a plane ticket or a taxi to the airport.

He later called Fielder and convinced him to come to New York. He also asked Bobby Colomby, Anderson and Steve Katz, who was his bandmate in his former band The Blues Project. Colomby called Fred Lipsius and the band placed an ad in The Village Voice for more horn players. Within a month, the band assembled an eight piece which also contained Randy Brecker, Jerry Weiss and Dick Halligan. Kooper then asked John Simon to produce them, after being fresh off from producing Simon & Garfunkel’s album Bookends. The album was recorded in two weeks in December 1967. Simon asked all of the members to record their material in one take so he could study songs and make useful suggestions to the arrangements.

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After a brief promotional tour, Colomby and Katz ousted Kooper from the band, which led to Child is Father to the Man being the only BS&T album on which Kooper ever appeared. The band would later have a number one album and several Grammys, although Kooper felt they were playing music that he didn’t agree with. Despite being asked to leave Blood, Sweat & Tears, Kooper felt everything worked out well for him and the band.

In the United States Child Is Father to the Man peaked at #47 on Billboard’s Pop Albums chart. It failed to generate any Top 40 singles, although “I Love You More Than You’ll Ever Know” and “I Can’t Quit Her” found some play on progressive rock radio.

In 2003, the album was ranked number 264 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

The title is a quotation from a similarly titled poem by Gerard Manley Hopkins, slightly misquoting a poem by William Wordsworth called “My Heart Leaps Up”. (by wikipedia)

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Child Is Father to the Man is keyboard player/singer/arranger Al Kooper’s finest work, an album on which he moves the folk-blues-rock amalgamation of the Blues Project into even wider pastures, taking in classical and jazz elements (including strings and horns), all without losing the pop essence that makes the hybrid work. This is one of the great albums of the eclectic post-Sgt. Pepper era of the late ’60s, a time when you could borrow styles from Greenwich Village contemporary folk to San Francisco acid rock and mix them into what seemed to have the potential to become a new American musical form. It’s Kooper’s bluesy songs, such as “I Love You More Than You’ll Ever Know” and “I Can’t Quit Her,” and his singing that are the primary focus, but the album is an aural delight; listen to the way the bass guitar interacts with the horns on “My Days Are Numbered” or the charming arrangement and Steve Katz’s vocal on Tim Buckley’s “Morning Glory.” Then Kooper sings Harry Nilsson’s “Without Her” over a delicate, jazzy backing with flügelhorn/alto saxophone interplay by Randy Brecker and Fred Lipsius. This is the sound of a group of virtuosos enjoying itself in the newly open possibilities of pop music. Maybe it couldn’t have lasted; anyway, it didn’t. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Randy Brecker (trumpet, flugelhorn)
Bobby Colomby (drums, percussion, vocals)
Jim Fielder (bass)
Dick Halligan (trombone)
Steve Katz (guitar, lute, vocals)
Al Kooper (keyboards, ondioline, vocals)
Fred Lipsius (piano, saxophone)
Jerry Weiss (trumpet, flugelhorn, vocals)
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Anahid Ajemian (violin)
Fred Catero (sound effects)
Harold Coletta (viola)
Paul Gershman (violin)
Al Gorgoni (organ, guitar, vocals)
Manny Green (violin)
Julie Held (violin)
Doug James (shaker)
Harry Katzman (violin)
Leo Kruczek (violin)
Harry Lookofsky (violin)
Charles McCracken (cello)
Melba Moorman (background vocals)
Gene Orloff (violin)
Valerie Simpson (background vocals)
Alan Schulman (cello)
John Simon (keyboards, cowbell)
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The Manny Vardi Strings

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Tracklist:
01. Overture (Kooper) 1.32
02. I Love You More Than You’ll Ever Know (Kooper) 5.57
03. Morning Glory (Beckett/Buckley) 4.16
04. My Days Are Numbered (Kooper) 3.19
05. Without Her (Nilsson) 2.41
06. Just One Smile (Newman) 4.38
07. I Can’t Quit Her (Kooper/Levine) 3.38
08. Meagan’s Gypsy Eyes (Katz) 3.24
09. Somethin’ Goin’ On (Kooper) 8.00
10. House In The Country (Kooper) 3.04
11. The Modern Adventures Of Plato, Diogenes And Freud (Kooper) 4.12
12. So Much Love/Underture (Goffin/King/Kooper) 4.47

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