Linda Hoyle – Pieces Of Me (1971)

FrontCover1A more than important jazz/blues singer from UK:

Linda Nicholas (born Linda Hoile, 13 April 1946), known by her stage name Linda Hoyle, is a singer, songwriter and art therapist. She is best known for her work with the band Affinity (1968–1971), as well as for her collaboration with Karl Jenkins on her album Pieces of Me, produced in 1971. Hoyle’s latest album, The Fetch, produced by Mo Foster, was released by Angel Air on 7 August 2015.

Linda was born and grew up in Hammersmith, London. Her mother, Marjorie (“Madge”, née Penfold), was a shorthand typist, working with the Kensington and Chelsea Police Force and CID. Her father, Gordon (“Dick”) was an accountant with Sun Life Insurance.

For the first decade of Linda’s life, the family lived in a small ground-floor flat with few amenities. Nevertheless, on a Saturday, Dick would buy a new 78 rpm jazz record which was played for the family to dance to. This music consisted mostly of Fats Waller, Louis Armstrong, Mezz Mezzrow and others, with an historic backlog of Bessie Smith, Bix Beiderbeck, Mugsy Spanier and Fletcher Henderson. Oddities from 1920s and 30s jazz were the backbone of Linda’s musical experience, stirred into Madge’s attempts to introduce classical music – Vaughan Williams, Tchaikovsky, Elgar.

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Wendy + Linda Hoyle ca. 1961

Her early education was at St Peter’s, a Church school, then Chiswick County School for Girls. She was told in no uncertain terms by her music teacher, Miss Cooper, that she showed no ability. However, she happily sang Everly Brothers songs, in harmony with friends, in the echoing school toilets.

Wendy Hoile, Linda’s younger sister, was able to sing in harmony from a very young age. She played guitar and sang in a band, Blanch Carter and the Lounge Lizards, in the late 1960s and early 70s.[2] Both Linda and her sister learnt first to play the ukulele and then the guitar. They performed together often at family gatherings and parties, sometimes using the family convector heater, a Valor, as a primitive piece of echo and reverb equipment, singing into it even when it was lit.

Linda’s main vocal influence, Billie Holiday, was introduced to her at 16 by a family friend who played her “Strange Fruit”. She went immediately and spent her savings on Volume One of the CBS compilation The Billie Holiday Story, learning all the vocals note for note. After hearing Ella Fitzgerald’s recording of “I Can’t Face the Music” she began to include more modern improvisation influences: Sara Vaughan, Anita O’Day, Frank Sinatra and later Betty Carter, Cleo Laine, Karen Dalton, Laura Nyro and others.

After finishing at Chiswick County, Linda worked for a year at Hammersmith Hospital as a trainee Laboratory Technician, followed by a three-year teacher training course at Wall Hall College of Education, Hertfordshire.

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Linda Hoyle + Lynton Naiff

Through a boyfriend who was a student at Sussex University, Hoyle met the University of Sussex’s US Jazz Trio – Lynton Naiff (keyboards), Foster (drums) and Nick Nicholas (double bass) – who asked her to sing with them at a nightclub on the Sussex coast. It was during this time that a flurry of interchangeable jazz-rock bands were playing at Sussex, culminating in a decision by Naiff, Foster and Grant Serpell to pursue playing professionally. Naiff, at the time enrolled to do a MSc in Mathematics, dropped out of his course after a few months, renting a bungalow on the South Downs to organise the band. Mike Jopp was recruited as lead guitarist, and after considering male singers it was decided to take the risk of having a female front the band. Although in a previous incarnation the band had been known as “Ice”, the name Affinity was chosen. Naiff, particularly, was a huge fan of Oscar Peterson, after whose 1961 album the name was chosen.

The shift of Linda’s name from Hoile to Hoyle occurred early in her singing career. Journalists and interviewers invariably spelt it incorrectly as Hoyle, a much more common spelling.

The band quickly found work and their first live performance was in London at the Revolution on Bruton Street in 1968, which was managed by an insomniac businessman, Jim Carter-Fea, who also owned the Speakeasy and the Pheasantry in Chelsea. The Revolution was, in the late 1960s, a hot spot for celebrities. Affinity, over its many engagements there, had in their audience at various times Judy Garland, John Lennon and Stevie Wonder, the latter taking to the stage to play harmonica with the band.

LindaHoyle03Foster, in many ways the most enterprising member, introduced the band to Ronnie Scott’s management, who at the time were looking for new bands to play Upstairs at their renovated club. Almost immediately signed, they spent three years under contract, starting early in 1969. By the middle of that year, Scott’s decided that Affinity should also play Downstairs, opposite such jazz musicians as Les McCann and Stan Getz. This encouraged them to become more demanding of their own musical creativity. At the time of Affinity’s appearance opposite McCann in July 1969, Hoyle was interviewed by Melody Maker and spoke about her musical influences and her time with the band.

During this time Affinity were managed by Chips Chipperfield, who later produced The Beatles Anthology, a documentary series for television.

Naiff’s father, himself a musician, owned a music shop and business in Soho. The band initially used his own brand of amplifiers and speakers, called ‘Impact’. However, the quality was poor and Hoyle, pressing hard for vocal volume during live performances, damaged her vocal cords. Surgery became necessary to remove nodes, and she was unable to sing for some months. She decided to seek vocal training from a professional singing teacher.

The album Affinity was released in 1970. Affinity’s contract with Vertigo, a branch of Philips Records, included an advance payment, which allowed them to buy new equipment and a more comfortable six-wheel vehicle, and to employ a roadie. The band were busy with TV appearances, and touring in the UK and Europe; even so they were finding it hard to live on their earnings. In her interview with Jackie magazine in December 1970, Hoyle talked about the upsides and downsides of life on the road.

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Linda Hoyle in Germany with Affinity, ca. 1970

The same year Hoyle recorded the jingle for a Shredded Wheat television commercial “There are two men in my life” with Foster and Mike Jopp, both playing acoustic guitars. The commercial achieved much attention in the UK and Hoyle performed the song on the Michael Parkinson Show.

Annie Nightingale, a pioneering BBC presenter, travelled with the band in January 1971, making a film about their life on the road for TV. However, at this time Hoyle’s three-year relationship with Naiff was coming to an end and she was ready to quit the band.

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Affinity reunion at a private party in 2006 (L to R: Linda Hoyle, Mike Jopp, Mo Foster, Grant Serpell and Geoff Castle, replacing Lynton Naiff)

In 1971 Ronnie Scott suggested that Hoyle work with Karl Jenkins on a solo album. They wrote many of the songs together and Jenkins invited Chris Spedding, John Marshall, and Jeff Clyne, all from Nucleus, among others to play on the album. Only 300 copies of the album, Pieces of Me, were pressed. It is one of Vertigo’s rarest albums.

Hoyle emigrated to Canada in 1972, where she continued to sing, mostly jazz, with various musicians. During a sabbatical year in England in 1980, Hoyle performed and sang with the People Show. People Show No 84 (The Bridge), was staged at the Royal Court Theatre, London and the Crucible, Sheffield. Since 1984, Hoyle has sung and worked with Oliver Whitehead. Hoyle’s return to writing and recording was sparked by an Affinity reunion at a private party in 2006. After performing again with Foster at Sussex University’s 50th anniversary celebration in 2011 (this performance released as The Baskervilles Reunion 2011), work on The Fetch began. The songs on this album are all original, composed by Foster or Whitehead, with lyrics by Hoyle. The musicians include Ray Russell, Gary Husband, B. J. Cole, Peter Van Hooke and Julian Littman.

Hoyle received an Honours BA in Psychology in 1975, and a Master’s degree in Biomedical Ethics in 1982, both from the University of Western Ontario. She worked as a therapist in various agencies, and trained in Art Therapy with Irene Dewdney (1914–1999). They remained colleagues and co-workers for the rest of Dewdney’s life. With Dewdney and others, she started The Ontario Art Therapy Association in 1979. In 1988 Hoyle was invited to establish the Post Graduate Diploma in Art Therapy at the University of Western Ontario, running the programme and teaching. She co-authored, with Dewdney an art therapy textbook, Drawing Out The Self: The Objective Approach in Art Therapy, which was published in 2011, together with an accompanying Web site.

In 1972 Hoyle married John “Nick” Nicholas, the original bass player with the University of Sussex Jazz Trio. Nicholas is a historian of philosophy and science. Their daughter, Emily, was born in 1982. (by wikipedia)

And this is her extremly rare first solo album:

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It probably isn’t surprising to learn that Hoyle’s solo debut, cut following the final dissolution of Affinity in 1971, does not deviate too far from that band’s jazz-rock modus operandi. However, in seeking to trim the instrumental fat from Affinity’s sometimes gruelling work-outs, and concentrate the attention on the songs (and lyrics) themselves, it rises far above its role model, to showcase Hoyle as a far more exciting figure than her footnotes in history would have you believe. Reminiscent in places of the best of Julie Driscoll’s late 1960s work — a role model that Hoyle was singularly well-placed to succeed — Pieces of Me likewise borrows from several of Driscoll’s own influences.

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Karl Jenkins

The Nina Simone and Laura Nyro songbooks both contribute to the proceedings, with the latter’s “Lonely Woman” standing among the best tracks on the entire album. But Hoyle’s own work, largely written in tandem with keyboard player Karl Jenkins, is equally powerful, with the eerie “Hymn to Valerie Solanis” (titled for, but never mentioning the woman who shot Andy Warhol), and the regretful “Journey’s End” ranking among the other highlights. The intriguing “Ballad of Marty Mole,” meanwhile, reads like a cross between Bob Dylan and Beatrix Potter, and could well give children nightmares for days. (by Dave Thompson)

This is one of the most fascinating albums I ever heard  … it starts with one of the best Blues songs ever recorded …

And then you´ll hear very intensive and intimate songs … this album is a must !

And it ends with another great blues song from 1936, written by Willard Robison  … :

Down in Alabama, in the Revenue Mountains,
Laughing water comes out of strange fountains!
And when the evenin’ sun goes down,
Come ye’s on down to Barrelhouse Town.

There’s a dim lighted tavern,
Known as Mammy’s Rest;
Folks down in ‘Bam will tell you
That it’s Mammy’s place that they love the best.

Theres a sweet tone piano,
Worn by many thumbs,
And there’s a fellow that plays it
That uses his pedal for drums.

If you come down to Birmingham
With nary a place to go,
Fond a man called Cactus Sam,
Tell him you wanna go barrelhouse,
That’s all he needs to know!

Be there for supper
Or a plate of barbecue,
And this, along with the music,
Will make a barrelhouse man of you;
What I mean is,
You will have that lowdown feelin’ too!

If you find yourself in Birmingham
without a place to go,
Come on down to my house,
Make a palette on the floor.

I’ll have you meet some southern gal,
A-gentle sweet and kind;
There, words for your music
And music for your mind!

Let’s go barrelhouse,
All night long!

I would like to dedicate this entry to a very special woman !

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Personnel:
Jeff Clyne (bass)
Linda Hoyle (vocals)
Karl Jenkins (piano, oboe)
John Marshall (drums, percussion)
Chris Spedding (guitar)
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Colin Purbrook (piano (on 11.)

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Tracklist:
01. Backlash Blues (Simone) 5.54
02. Paper Tulips (Hoyle/Jenkins) 3.32
03. Black Crow (Hoyle/Jenkins) 3.16
04. For My Darling (Hoyle/Jenkins) 3.57
05. Pieces Of Me (Hoyle/Jenkins) 4.07
06. Lonely Women (Nyro) 4.05
07. Hymn To Valerie Solanas (Hoyle/Jenkins) 4.02
08. The Ballad Of Morty Mole (Hoyle/Jenkins) 4.32
09. Journey’s End (Hoyle/Jenkins) 3.14
10. Morning For One (Hoyle/Jenkins) 4.22
11. Barrel House Music (Bailey) 2.44

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Linda Hoyle in 2015

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Laboratorium – Quasimodo (1979)

LPFrontCover1The end of the 60’s is an important period in jazz, as well as rock music. Both in Poland and the rest of the world, the year 1969 was a caesura for those who saw in records such us King Crimson’s debut the birth of progressive rock, and those for whom Krzysztof Komeda’s death marked the end of a certain stage in Polish jazz. The boundaries are of course a totally contractual and unspecified matter, but definitely the turn of the 60’s and 70’s was an extremely creative period, which set the foundations for various styles and trends. In this time – the year 1970 – in Krakow, Laboratorium was also born – although its roots must be searched for in a more distant past…

Janusz Grzywacz, Laboratorium’s leader, set his first musical steps in Krakow. Basically throughout the whole high school period he regularly formed bands: Smiacze, Lamparty, Tytani, in which also played Marek Stryszowski, his school companion, who happened to live on the same street. In that time Grzywacz had also connections with Krakow’s cabaret scene and with the emerging STU Theatre. During his collage years in Polish studies he formed another band. Eventually a five-person lineup was set, consisting of Janusz Grzywacz (piano), Mieczyslaw Górka (drums), Waclaw Lozinski (flute), Edmund Maciwoda (bass, soon to be replaced by Maciej Górski) and Marek Stryszowski, who did the vocals and played the bassoon, to finally replace it by a sax.

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Their live debut was on the Gitariada ’71 festival. They start to play fusion, jazz-rock music, as the predecessors of such sounds in Poland. The first years of their activity brought mainly acoustic music, cleverly escaping any definitions. The musicians searched and experimented. The situation in which Poland was at that time – the limited access to Western recordings and albums – was not an obstacle for the band. On the contrary, Laboratorium became an unique sound, which was often underlined in various reviews.

The band’s album debut was in January 1973. The record consisted of two tracks recorded in April ’72 in a studio that belonged to the PR III of the Polish Radio. That recording session was an award for taking second place on the Jazz Nad Odra ’72 festival. The tracks were noticed for a different approach both towards harmony and tension-building. The first song – ‘Choral’ – included also a vocal fragment by Marek Stryszowski. In the latter period his signing became an important and significant element building Labolatoriu’s style, although it limited only to vocalizations, often revealing the use of electronic voice-modulation effects – here, however, Stryszowski, as a ‘classical’ vocalist, sings the track’s lyrics.

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In 1973 the band was again awarded on the Jazz Nad Odra festival, this time taking first place and the award for best composition (Janusz Grzywacz’s ‘Prognoza na jutro’). This prize actually meant an advance from the amateur status to professionalism. In 1975 Czeslaw Niemen, who just left his band Aerolit, offered the group his cooperation. He performed with Laboratorium on several shows and festivals, presenting music from the album ‘Katharsis’ along with new songs, which became the basis for a double-album ‘Idee Fixe’, released a few years later. The cooperation had however only a ‘guest’ character – Niemen soon formed a new band, while Laboratorium kept following their own path. The band met at that time with another musician – Tomasz Stanko, with whom they performed at Zaduszki Jazzowe ‘ 75. The music undergone some changes (Janusz Grzywacz replaced his acoustic piano for a novelty at that time – Fender Rhodes), so did the lineup. The band parted with Waclaw Lozinski and Maciej Górski was soon replaced by Krzysztof Scieranski (known from playing with Marek Grechuta), followed by his brother Pawel Scieranski, who became the first guitarist in the history of Laboratorium. In this lineup the band recorded its first official album – ‘Modern Pentathlon’.

The record consisted of a long, five-part title track – „Pieciobój nowoczesny’ and four shorter songs, apart from one (‘Grzymaszka’), strongly settled in the funky style. In the title suite we can hear electronically modulated vocalizations by Marek Stryszowski (whose experiments could resemble the style of Urszula Dudziak), as well as a rich usage of sound potentiality of a single, monophonic Roland synthesizer (which was operated at that time by Janusz Grzywacz) and accelerated, fragments based on twitchy, pulsating drums, and recalling the achievements of Mahavishnu Orchestra. What is important, the band with all those various references kept their artistic identity, confirmed with musical sensitivity and the musicians’ skills.

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The album was released in the Polish jazz series (nr 49) in an unbelievable pace considering the Polish phonographic standards at that time. There often occurred such situations when the time from recording the album to releasing it took about a year or even longer, while Laboratorium’s debut – recorded in the beginning of summer ’76 – was launched in fall, during the next Jazz Jamboree festival. An innovatory (at that time) album premiere was organized in the Polish Recordings hall in Warsaw, along with record-signing (years after it was announced that the sales count for ‘Modern Pentathlon’ reached 115 thousand copies!). Following the success of their album the band begins to perform again, apart from playing in Poland it also visits Germany, as well as the exotic Jazz Yatra festival, which took place in 1978 in India and was another important step in the group’s career (apart from Laboratorium the Polish representation consisted also of Czeslaw Niemen’s and Zbigniew Namyslowski’s bands).

Laboratorium05Even before the trip to the festival, in 1997 the group recorded another two albums with a lineup extended by Pawel Valde-Nowak, playing the congas. During the September shows in Warsaw’s ‘Akwarium’, an album for the „Bialy Kruk Czarnego Krazka’ series was recorded – ‘Aquarium Live No. 1’, which tried to capture the atmosphere present on Laoratorium’s concerts. Meanwhile, in Krakow’s ‘Rotunda’ the band recorded the album ‘Nurek’, which was supposed to be released by Polskie Nagrania, at the time of the Jazz Yatra festival. Unfortunately that didn’t happen. Simultaneously the band was contacting Helicon (the International Jazz Federation’s record label), which eventually released ‘Nurek’ under the English title ‘Diver’. As for Polskie Nagrania, the group prepared in 1979 a one-record album ‘Quasimodo’ (Polish Jazz series, nr 58), while the material meant for Elacoli, ‘Nogero’, was released on the German market by View Records. The first of the albums contained a few longer compositions intertwining with various and fascinating miniatures.

The end of the 70’s brought another personal changes within the band – the group parted with Mieczyslaw Górka, who was in Laboratorium from the beginning. Andrzej Mrowiec, previously known from Maanam, became Laboratorium’s new drummer. Soon after that Krzysztof Scieranski left the band and started a cooperation with Zbigniew Namyslowski (he was replaced by Krzysztof Olesinski, also from Maanam) and so did his brother Pawel (Ryszard Styla took his place in Laboratorium).

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After a successful performance at the Zurich Jazz Festival, a Swiss agency Face Music took care of the band. In these years Laboratorium performed on less shows in Poland, more often visiting the West. In the turn of February and March ’82 the group recorded its performances in Krakow’s STU Theatre and released them on an album ‘The Blue Light Pilot’ (with the following lineup: Grzywacz – Stryszowski – Styla – Olesinski – Mrowiec). The band’s music slowly changed, so did the instrumentation – Janusz Grzywacz more often used various synthesizers, as well as one of the first in Poland, custom-made 16-step sequencer. On that album for the first (and only) time appeared a track which wasn’t written by the band – Thelonious Monk’s ‘Straight No Chaser’, arranged in an unique way, mostly thanks to the mentioned sequencer. In the title track, extremely mechanical and full of energy, there are interwoven various citations and references. The next album – ‘No. 8’ (1984) – continued the band’s search, giving more original ideas. Among them worth mentioning are the use of a vocoder, the enrichment of the rhythmic pattern by adding Jan Pilch’s various percussion instruments and the guest appearance by violin player Jan Bledowski, who later toured with the band. The last studio album with brand new material was prepared two years later. ‘Anatomy Lesson’ was another logical step in Laboratorium’s career. Sampled sounds appeared – yet another progress in the musical search. The album till this day intrigues with the variety of its sound, in the same time being compact and characteristic to the band’s overall creation.

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The group also functioned as a trio: Grzywacz – Stryszowski – Pilch, performing with this lineup on festivals such as ‘Electric Music Island’ in Wroclaw (1984). Meanwhile, Jan Pilch permanently joins the band. In the last years of their activity, Laboratorium was supported by Jaroslaw Smietana, among other places they visited Switzerland.

In various press articles from the 90’s one can see the year 1990 as the end of Laboratorium’s career. During the next decade the band appeared several times on stage, also during the celebration of their 25th anniversary (which was documented by TV production ’25 Years of Laborka’) – all the band’s guitarists appeared together on stage at that time. Janusz Grzywacz is an active illustrative musician, he writes for the theatre (more than 100 premieres) and for the film, he also released two solo albums – ‘Muzyka osobista’ and ‘Mlynek Kawowy’. Marek Stryszowski performs with his band Little Egoist, he’s also the boss of a PSJ branch in Krakow. It’s impossible not to write about all of Laboratorium’s musicians – some of them are still active on the scene, others ended their careers in music. Laboratorium, however, gained a solid and unquestionable status in Polish rock and jazz music. Janusz Grzywacz sums it up: I think we had our fantastic.. no, not five – eleven minutes, which I sincerely wish to all musicians. We played more than a thousand concerts, were invited by major festivals and recorded 9 albums. I know that such thing is impossible to achieve in the jazz market nowadays. I also know that Laboratorium never really fell apart, to be honest. It’s because that our music is still inside us. In each of us there’s still the same way of thinking and playing, the same sensitivity and perspective towards music, which characterized Laborka. And it always will. (Michal Wilczynski)

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This is the 2nd album by Polish Jazz-Rock Fusion ensemble Laboratorium, which was one of several great Polish bands (like Extra Ball for example) playing in that vein during the 1970s. Founded by keyboardist Janusz Grzywacz, the band’s founding members included also saxophonist / vocalist Marek Stryszowski and drummer Mieczyslaw Gorka. After an initial period of trying to find a musical identity, the band was joined by brothers Pawel Scieranski on guitar and Krzysztof Scieranski on bass (one of the greatest Polish bass players) and settled into the Fusion genre, with a musical approach and sound not far away from Weather Report. This, their second recording, presents them in their full power and the recording is quite stunning in its sophistication and instrumental aptitude. The music includes pieces composed by all members of the group. As opposed to most American Fusion at the time, which was mostly based on simplistic melodies and endless instrumental doodling, this music is atmospheric, intelligent, sophisticated, well developed and coherent, clearly well rooted in the European musical tradition. Fusion fans are well advised to try this out and explore this wonderful music, which is expanding the genre’s limitations to the max. This music will also interest fans Prog fans, as it is close in spirit to the Canterbury genre. Superb stuff (Adam Baruch)

In other words: High class Jazz-Rock !!!

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Personnel:
Mieczysław Górka (drums, percussion)
Janusz Grzywacz (piano, synthesizer)
Krzysztof Ścierański (bass)
Paweł Ścierański (guitar)
Marek Stryszowski (saxophone, vocals, effects)

LPBackCover1Tracklist:
01. Przejazd (The Journey) (K. Ścierański) 1.35
02. I’m Sorry, I’m Not Driver (K. Ścierański) 7.07
03. Etiudka / Little Etude (Grzywacz) 1.26
04. Śniegowa Panienka (The Snow Girl) (M. Stryszowski) 8.16
05. Lady Rolland (M. Stryszowski) 1.44
06. Quasimodo (Grzywacz) 10.51
07. Kyokushinkai (Górka/P. Ścierański) 2.54
08- Ikona / An Icon (In Memory Of Zbigniew Seifert) (Grzywacz) 6.15
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09.  Etiudka (Grzywacz) 2.34
10. Sniegowa Panienka (M. Stryszowski) 11.08
11. Odjazd (Górka/Grzywacz/K. Ścierański/P.Ścierański/Stryszowski) 5.36
12. Zdrowie Na Budowie (Grzywacz) 6.46

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Source: jazz.umk.pl

Pete York´s New York – What´s The Racket (1981)

FrontCover1After four years with the jazz-focused Chris Barber Band, drummer Pete York departed to form his own group, recruiting bassist Steve Richardson, Mel Thorpe on horns and woodwinds, and synth/keyboardist Roger Munns. Signing to the German Teldec label, the band released four Germany-only albums, kicking off with its 1980 debut, Into the Furnace, produced by Thomas Martin.

York’s time with Barber was well spent; it gave the drummer his first opportunity to play in a jazz ensemble, an experience he wasn’t ready to leave behind just yet. Thus, much of Into the Furnace is jazz-inspired, although with ribbons of rock and R&B streaming through, the band creates a hybrid sound far removed from the fusion most groups parleyed when crossing these genres.

Here´s the scond album by Pete York´s New York … and it´s another highlight in the long career of Mr. Superdumming Pete York:

You can hear one of the few Pete York compositions “What´s The Racket” … a hell of of jazz-rock tune …

And his “Chicken Chasing Charlie” is indeed a remake of his “Extension 345” from the third Hardin & York album “For The World” (1972)

“Pamplona” is a very fine acoustic guitar track, somposed and playd by Steve Richardson.

And Mel Thorpe was a monster on his instruments … listen to his saxophone and flute (“Segura Samba”)

Pete York´s New York was one of the best periods in Pete York´s career … a criminally underrated jazz group …

I gues this album was never released on CD … so … listen to one af the rarest Pete York recordings.

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Pete York – Steve Richardson – Roger Munns

 

Personnel:
Roger Munns (keyboards, synthesizer)
Steve Richardson (bass, guitar)
Mel Thorpe (saxophone, flute, clarinet)
Pete York (drums, percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. What’s The Racket (York) 3.52
02. Segura Samba (Thorpe/Munns) + Pamplona (Richardson) 7.43
03. Seguidillas Gitanas (Thorpe/Munns) 3.38
04. Hobgoblin (Thorpe/Munns) 2.51
05. Happy (Richardson) 3.21
06. Lucky For Some (Thorpe/Munns) 4.20
07. Chicken Chasing Charlie (York) 10.21

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Kornet – Same (1975)

FrontCover1KORNET was a jazz-rock group formed at Framnäs college in Öjebyn by guitarist Stefan BJORKLUND, drummer Ake SUNDQVIST, and keyboardist Stefan NILSSON in 1974. They were joined by Anders JONSSON on Vibes, bassist Sten FORSMAN and a large ensemble including brass, woodwinds and strings. Their sought-after debut LP ‘Kornet’ was released in 1975 on Manifest. The collective went on to release two more albums during their heyday, ‘Fritt Fall’ in 1977 [also on Manifest] and ‘Kornet III’ in ’79 on PickUp Records. (by progarchives.com)

Very good Jazz Rock band from Ojebyn,Sweden,formed in 1974,which released 3 LP’s between 1975 and 1979.All members had a good background mostly in pop music,until they got tired and decided to choose a more demanding music path.This decision led them to the release of their self-titled debut in 1975,which is their strongest effort for many Prog/Jazz Rock collectors.The band consisted of Stefan Nillson on piano/synths, Stefan Björklund on guitars, Sten Forsman on bass/cello, Allan Lundström on saxes, Åke Sundqvist on drums/percussions/vibraphone and Johan Engström on flutes/acoustic guitars.

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The tracks can be split in three categories: These into fast and furious grooves with great guitar solos and powerful interplays,these into flute-driven calm jazzy prog with a slight Canterbury feeling,while the third category includes compositions in a Free Jazz from,dominated by improvisational saxes and nice work on bass/contrabass by Forsman.All of them are of very high quality without exception,which shows the band great talent and perfect collaboration.I can also make an honourable reference to the awesome electric piano work of Stefan Nillson,who also had an underground personal career in the 80’s,releasing 3 personal LP’S.Very decent work,highly recommended to Jazz Rock lovers. (by apps79)

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Personnel:
Stefan Björklund (guitar)
Johan Engström (flute)
Sten Forsman (bass, cello on 04.)
Allan Lundström (saxophone)
Stefan Nilsson (piano, synthesizer)
Åke Sundqvist (drums, percussion, french horn on 03., vibraphone 0n 04.)
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Johan Engström (guitar on 04.)
Anders Jonsson (xycolophone, percussion 0n 04.)
Jan Skoglund (bassoon on 04.)

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Tracklist:
01. Skriket Från Vildmarken (Björklund) 3.08
02. Sju Hungriga År (Nilsson) 4.45
03.  Jojk (Traditional) 0.45
04. Friska Fläktar (Nilsson) 5.06
05. Frunk (Sundqvist) 3.35
06. Intrude, Tretaktar’n (Nilsson) 7.06
07. Pygges Blues (Björklund) 3.43
08. Musik Ur Filmen ‘Adams Födelse’ (Jonsson) 3.32

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Tony Williams Lifetime – (Turn It Over) (1970)

LPFrontCover1The Tony Williams Lifetime was a jazz fusion group led by jazz drummer Tony Williams.

The Tony Williams Lifetime was founded in 1969 as a power trio with John McLaughlin on electric guitar, and Larry Young (a.k.a. Khalid Yasin) on organ. The band was possibly named for Williams’ debut album as a bandleader, Life Time, released on Blue Note in 1964. Its debut album was Emergency!, a double album released on Polydor/PolyGram Records in 1969. It was largely rejected by jazz listeners at the time of its release because of its heavy rock influences, but it is now looked upon as a fusion classic. Jack Bruce joined the group to provide bass and vocals on its second album, Turn it Over, released in 1970 (by wikipedia)

The better of the two albums the Tony Williams Lifetime recorded in 1970, Turn It Over, is a far more focused and powerful album than the loose, experimental Ego, and one of the more intense pieces of early jazz-rock fusion around. In parts, it’s like Jimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys with much better chops. It’s more rock-oriented and darker-hued than their debut, 1969’s Emergency!, and the temporary addition of ex-Cream member Jack Bruce on bass and vocals alongside stalwart guitarist John McLaughlin makes this something of a milestone of British progressive jazz.

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The album’s primary flaw is that unlike the expansive double album Emergency!, these ten songs are tightly constricted into pop-song forms — only a swinging cover of Antonio Carlos Jobim’s “Once I Loved” breaks the five-minute mark, and then only barely — which reins in these marvelous soloists too much. This is particularly frustrating since pieces like the two-part “To Whom It May Concern” feature some outstanding solos (especially from McLaughlin and organist Larry Young, the group’s secret weapon) that are frustratingly, tantalizingly short. Expanded to a double album, Turn It Over would probably surpass Emergency! as a pioneering jazz-rock fusion release; as it is, it’s an exciting but mildly maddening session. (by Stewart Mason)

What a line-up ! Including a very fine bass solo by Jack Bruce on “Right On”. The solo was called “Powerhouse Sod” and you can hear on the West, Bruce Laing live album, too.

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Personnel:
Jack Bruce (bass, vocals)
John McLaughlin (guitar, vocals)
Tony Williams (drums, vocals)
Larry Young (organ)

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Tracklist:
01. Vuelta Abajo (Williams) 6.34
02. To Whom It May Concern: Us/Them (Corea) 7.16
03. This Night This Song (Williams) 3.52
04. Do That (Williams) 2.56
05. Big Nick (Coltrane) 3.17
06. Once I Loved (Jobim/Demoraes/Gilbert) 5-10
07. To Whom (Williams) 2.20
08. Allah Be Praised (Young) 6.13
09. Right On (Williams) 8.05
10. A Famous Blues (McLaughlin) 4.16
11. New Piece (Williams) 6.16

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Colosseum – Daughter Of Time (1971)

FrontCover1.Daughter of Time is the fourth album by Colosseum, released in 1970. The album remained for five weeks in the UK Albums Chart peaking number 23. Recorded in the midst of an upheaval in the band’s lineup, only one of its eight tracks, “Three Score and Ten, Amen”, features all six of the official band members. (by wikipedia)

A concept album loosely based on man’s fascination and allure for war throughout the ages, Daughter of Time contains all the elements required to create a pure progressive rock album. Joining David Greenslade and Chris Farlowe is Louis Cennamo from Renaissance, who plucks away at the bass guitar with a heavy hand. A multitude of instruments combine to create a brilliant melange of music on every one of the eight songs. Vibrant spurts of trombone, trumpet, and flute are driven to the height of each song, which gives way to some implements of jazz fusion. Rich organ and vibraphone can be heard in behind “Three Score and Ten Amen” and “Take Me Back to Doomsday” adding to the melancholy theme.

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Colossum (with Dave Clempson + Tony Reeves)

Countering this are beautiful string arrangements made up of violin, viola, and cello used effectively to conjure up mood, and doing an excellent job. Even a flügelhorn is blared from time to time on top of the accentuated drums. A spoken word passage from Dick Heckstall-Smith creates an eerie aura, as his voice echoes on about the coming of the apocalypse. Colosseum’s music works extremely well in that it builds suspense and reels the listener into the songs. As far as the lyrics go, they’re stark and foreboding and have a mediaeval taste to them, coinciding with the music perfectly. Each song, all around six minutes in length, should have been longer to let the instruments play out with their illustriousness. Except for the fact that it is a short album, Daughter of Time is a sturdy example of progressive rock. (by Mike DeGagne)

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In other words: this is a classic and timeless album, a must for every serious record collection …

Listen to the great cover version of Jack Bruce´s “Theme For An Imaginary Western” … totally different from the version of Mountain … but what a version … hear Chris Farlowe, hear the drums of Jon Hiseman … and listen to the lyrics of Pete Brown:

When the wagons leave the city
For the forest, and further on
Painted wagons of the morning
Dusty roads where they have gone
Sometimes traveling through the darkness
Met the summer coming home
Fallen faces by the wayside
Looked as if they might have known
Oh the sun was in their eyes
And the desert that dries
In the country towns
Where the laughter sounds

Oh the dancing and the singing
Oh the music when they played
Oh the fires that they started
Oh the girls with no regret
Sometimes they found it
Sometimes they kept it
Often lost it on the way
Fought each other to possess it
Sometimes died in sight of day

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And I got tears in my eyes, when I´m listing to he titel track of this album:

And I saw the…

Daughter to time through the lens of a dream
Reflecting the world as it seems to have been

Riding the night with a net full of stars
Her spirit is truth and her truth is ours

An unbelievable album … a monster album … each track is a classic … including the great drum solo on “The Time Machine”.

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Personnel:
Mark Clarke (bass guitar)
Dave “Clem” Clempson (guitar, vocal on 03.)
Chris Farlowe (vocals)
Dave Greenslade (keyboards, vibes, background vocals)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone, spoken word on 01.)
Jon Hiseman (drums, percussion)
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Louis Cennamo (bass on 02.,03., 04. + 06.)
Tony Reeves (bass on 08.)
Barbara Thompson (flute. saxophone; background vocals on 01. – 04.)

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Tracklist:
01. Three Score And Ten, Amen (Clempson/Greenslade/Hiseman) 5:38
02. Time Lament (Greenslade) 6:13
03. Take Me Back To Doomsday (Clempson/Greenslade/Hiseman/Heckstall-Smith 4:25
04. The Daughter Of Time (Dennen/Greenslade/Heckstall-Smith) 3:33
05. Theme For An Imaginary Western (Bruce/Brown) 4:07
06. Bring Out Your Dead (Clempson/Greenslade) 4:20
07. Downhill And Shadows (Clempson/Hiseman/Reeves) 6:13
08. The Time Machine (live) (Hiseman) 8.11

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Various Artists – Havana Jam 1 (1979)

FrontCover1Havana Jam was a three-day music festival that took place at the Karl Marx Theater, in Havana, Cuba, on 2–4 March 1979. It was sponsored by Bruce Lundvall, the president of Columbia Records, Jerry Masucci, the president of Fania Records, and the Cuban Ministry of Culture.

The festival included, on the American side, Weather Report, the CBS Jazz All-Stars, the Trio of Doom, Fania All-Stars, Stephen Stills, Billy Swan, Bonnie Bramlett, Mike Finnigan, Kris Kristofferson, Rita Coolidge and Billy Joel. The Cuban acts included Irakere, Pacho Alonso, Zaida Arrate, Elena Burke, Orquesta de Santiago de Cuba, Conjunto Yaguarimú, Frank Emilio, Juan Pablo Torres, Los Papines, Tata Güines, Cuban Percussion Ensemble, Sara González, Pablo Milanés, Manguaré, and Orquesta Aragón.

In 1977, US President Jimmy Carter and Cuban President Fidel Castro started to loosen the political tension between the two countries and opened Interest Sections both in Havana and Washington. It was the first time in almost two decades after Castro’s rise to power that there was a real interest in establishing a normalization of diplomatic relations and the lifting of the United States embargo against Cuba.

With a real crisis in the music industry in the United States and the start of the salsa boom, in April 1978, CBS Records director, Bruce Lundvall, saw an open door to probe Cuban music and together with a group of the company’s music enthusiasts made a four-day trip to Havana, where they were overwhelmed by the sound of Cuban music, but especially by Afro-Cuban jazz band Irakere, one of Cuba’s most highly regarded and virtuoso musical acts.

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After months of talks, Lundvall managed to sign Irakere and in July the group traveled to New York to perform an unannounced guest set at the famed Newport Jazz Festival-New York. Rave reviews led to an invitation from the prestigious Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland.

A few months later, Irakere won their first Grammy with the album Irakere, recorded at their Montreux Jazz Festival and Newport Jazz Festival performances, and Lundvall wanted to try his luck with other Cuban bands too. So, in the Fall of 1978, he joined forces with Fania Records director Jerry Masucci and convinced the Cuban cultural authorities to organize a three-day festival in Havana with the participation of Cuban and American musicians. The event would be recorded and televised for the enjoyment of both the Cuban and American people.

So they all agreed to set a date for the festival, spontaneously entitled Havana Jam. March 2 through 4, 1979, were the days earmarked for this historical step toward establishing a cultural exchange between the two enemy nations. In order to carry out the Herculean task of planning, Lundvall brought aboard Jock McLean and Phil Sandhaus, of Columbia’s artists development department. Both veterans of major concert promotion, they knew the festival needed professional production of the highest caliber, and enlisted Showco (a Dallas-based concert production company) and Studio Instrument Rentals for the task.

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At this point in time, Lundvall was diligently “feeling out” select members of the Columbia artist roster, all of whom were honored to accept the invitation to perform in Cuba. By early February the talent was confirmed. Representing the U.S. would be Billy Joel, Stephen Stills, Weather Report, Kris Kristofferson with Rita Coolidge, the Fania All-Stars and the CBS Jazz All-Stars. The latter group was conceptualized by Lundvall and scheduled to feature more than 20 top jazz artists on the label.

With the festival within grasp, other CBS Records personnel were summoned into the picture-rehearsals were set up for the CBS Jazz All-Stars, travel accommodations were made, equipment was rented, a wide cross-section of media was invited, and both recording and videotaping plans were confirmed.

Record producers Bert deCoteaux and Mike Berniker flew down with a crew from the CBS Recording Studios along with a support team and mobile 24-track Recording Studio from Record Plant NY.

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Engineered by David Hewitt with Phil Gitomer and Michael Guthrie. McLean, Sandhaus, Freston and various other people were already busy working in Havana’s Karl Marx Auditorium when the musicians landed at the José Martí airport on March 1.

Havana Jam was an invitation-only event, with mostly cultural personalities and members of the Communist Party and their children in attendance, though some students from different art and music schools were also invited.

The festival was hardly mentioned on the Cuban press, and thirty years later not many Cubans know it ever existed. (by wikipedia)

In 1979 many of Columbia’s top recording artists made a rare visit to Cuba where they performed (and recorded) at a series of concerts with some of the top Cuban groups. This double LP (unlike the strictly jazz Havana Jam 2) covers a wide range of music from Weather Report, the CBS Jazz All-Stars (an allstar group with Dexter Gordon, Stan Getz and Woody Shaw) and The Trio of Doom (John McLaughlin, Jaco Pastorius and Tony Williams) to Irakere, Stephen Stills, Kris Kristofferson and Rita Coolidge. There is enough worthwhile jazz on the two-fer to make this set worth picking up (by Scott Yanow).

What a great jam recording !

Recorded live at the Karl-Marx Theatre, Havana, Cuba, March 2-4, 1979

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Personnel:

CBS Jazz All-Stars:
Willie Bobo (percussion)
Arthur Blythe (saxophone)
Stan Getz (saxophone)
Dexter Gordon (saxophone)
Jimmy Heath (saxophone)
Percy Heath (bass)
Bobby Hutcherson (marimba)
Hubert Laws (flute)
Woody Shaw (trumpet)
Cedar Walton (piano)
Tony Williams (drums)

Cuban Percussion Ensemble:
Frank Emilio Guillermo Barreto, Changuito, Tata Guines, Los Papines (percussion)

Irakere:
Jorge “El Nono” Alfonso (percussion)
Carlos Averhoff (saxophone)
Armando Cuervo (percussion)
Paquito D’Rivera (saxophone)
Carlos Emilio Morales (guitar)
Enrique Pla (drums)
Carlos del Puerto (bass)
Arturo Sandoval (trumpet)
Jesus “Chucho” Valdes (piano)
Oscar Valdez (percussion)
Jorge Varona (trumpet)

Stephen Stills Band:
Bonnie Bramlett (vocals)
Mike Finnigan (keyboards)
Joe Lala (percussion)
George “Chocolate” Perry (bass)
Stephen Stills (guitar, vocals)
Gerry Tolman (guitar)
Joe Vitale (drums)

Trio Of Doom:
John McLaughlin (guitar)
Jaco Pastorius (bass)
Tony Williams (drums)

Weather Report:
Peter Erskine (drums)
Jaco Pastorius (bass)
Wayne Shorter (saxophone)
Joe Zawinul (electric piano, synthesizer)

And now, I´m too lazy to search all other musicians … sorry …

 

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Tracklist:
01. Weather Report: Black Market (Zawinul) 8.59
02. Irakere: Concerto Para Flaut y Adagio de Mozart(Rivera/Mozart) 9.48
03. Stephen Stills: Cuba al Fin(Stills) 7.48
04. Sara González: Su Nombre Es Pueblo (Gonzalez) 3.54
05. CBS Jazz All-Stars:  Project “S” (Heath) 8.36
06. Orquesta Aragón: Que Barla Mionda (Valdés) 7.37
07. Kris Kristofferson: Living Legend (Kristofferson) 4.29
08. Rita Coolidge: (Your Love Has Lifted Me) Higher and Higher (Smith/Miner/Jackson) 3:33
09. CBS Jazz All-Stars: Black Stockings (Laws) 6.24
10. Mike Finnigan + Bonnie Bramlett: How Wrong Can You Be (Gronenthal/Grace) 4.46
11. Fania All-Stars: Juan Pachanga (Blades/Ramirez/Masucci) 4.41
12. Trio Of Doom: Dark Prince (McLaughlin) 3.54
13. Cuban Percussion Ensemble: Scherezada/Sun Sun (Rimsky-Korsakov/Traditional) 7.41

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