Sergei Prokofiev – Peter And The Wolf (Herbert von Karajan – narrated by Peter Ustinov) (1959)

FrontCover1Peter and the Wolf, Op. 67, a ‘symphonic fairy tale for children’, is a musical composition written by Sergei Prokofiev in 1936. The narrator tells a children’s story, while the orchestra illustrates it. It is Prokofiev’s most frequently performed work, and one of the most frequently performed works in the entire classical repertoire. It has been recorded many times.

In 1936, Sergei Prokofiev was commissioned by Natalya Sats, the director of the Central Children’s Theatre in Moscow, to write a musical symphony for children. Sats and Prokofiev had become acquainted after he visited her theatre with his sons several times. The intent was to introduce children to the individual instruments of the orchestra. The first draft of the libretto was about a Young Pioneer (the Soviet version of a Boy Scout) called Peter who rights a wrong by challenging an adult. (This was a common theme in propaganda aimed at children in the USSR at the time.) However, Prokofiev was dissatisfied with the rhyming text produced by Antonina Sakonskaya, a then popular children’s author. Prokofiev wrote a new version where Peter captures a wolf. As well as promoting desired Pioneer virtues such as vigilance, bravery and resourcefulness, the plot illustrates Soviet themes such as the stubbornness of the un-Bolshevik older generation (the grandfather) and the triumph of Man (Peter) taming Nature (the wolf).

Sergej Prokofjew
Prokofiev produced a version for the piano in under a week, finishing it on April 15. The orchestration was finished on April 24. The work debuted at a children’s concert in the main hall of the Moscow Conservatory with the Moscow Philharmonic on 2 May 1936. However, Sats was ill and the substitute narrator inexperienced, and the performance failed to attract much attention.[1][3][4][5] Later that month a much more successful performance with Sats narrating was given at the Moscow Pioneers Palace. The American premiere took place in March 1938, with Prokofiev himself conducting the Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall, Boston with Richard Hale narrating. By that time Sats was serving a sentence in the gulag, where she was sent after her lover Marshal Mikhail Tukhachevsky was shot in June 1937.

Peter, a Young Pioneer, lives at his grandfather’s home in a forest clearing. One day, Peter goes out into the clearing, leaving the garden gate open, and the duck that lives in the yard takes the opportunity to go swimming in a pond nearby. The duck starts arguing with a little bird (“What kind of bird are you if you can’t fly?” – “What kind of bird are you if you can’t swim?”). Peter’s pet cat stalks them quietly, and the bird—warned by Peter—flies to safety in a tall tree while the duck swims to safety in the middle of the pond.

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Peter’s grandfather scolds him for being outside in the meadow alone (“Suppose a wolf came out of the forest?”), and, when he defies him, saying: “Boys like me are not afraid of wolves”, his grandfather takes him back into the house and locks the gate. Soon afterwards “a big, grey wolf” does indeed come out of the forest. The cat quickly climbs into a tree, but the duck, who has jumped out of the pond, is chased, overtaken, and swallowed by the wolf.

IllustrationPeter fetches a rope and climbs over the garden wall into the tree. He asks the bird to fly around the wolf’s head to distract it, while he lowers a noose and catches the wolf by its tail. The wolf struggles to get free, but Peter ties the rope to the tree and the noose only gets tighter.

Some hunters, who have been tracking the wolf, come out of the forest ready to shoot, but Peter gets them to help him take the wolf to a zoo in a victory parade (the piece was first performed for an audience of Young Pioneers during May Day celebrations) that includes himself, the bird, the hunters leading the wolf, the cat, and grumpy grumbling Grandfather (“What if Peter hadn’t caught the wolf? What then?”)

In the story’s ending, the listener is told: “If you listen very carefully, you’ll hear the duck quacking inside the wolf’s belly, because the wolf in his hurry had swallowed her alive.”
Performance directions

Prokofiev produced detailed performance notes in both English and Russian for Peter and the Wolf. According to the English version:

Each character of this tale is represented by a corresponding instrument in the orchestra: the bird by a flute, the duck by an oboe, the cat by a clarinet playing staccato in a low register, the grandfather by a bassoon, the wolf by three horns, Peter by the string quartet, the shooting of the hunters by the kettle drums and bass drum. Before an orchestral performance it is desirable to show these instruments to the children and to play on them the corresponding leitmotivs. Thereby, the children learn to distinguish the sonorities of the instruments during the performance of this tale. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a nive version with the great Peter Ustinov as narrator and Herbert von Karajan as the conductor of The Philharmonia Orchestra.

What a nicy musical fairy tale !

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Personnel:
Peter Ustinov (narrator)
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The Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by Herbert von Karajan

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Tracklist:
01. Peter And The Wolf (Prokofiev) (Part 1) 14.23
02. Peter And The Wolf (Prokofiev) (Part 2) 14.34
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03. Toy Symphony (Haydn) 11.01

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Al Ayre Español – A Century Of Spanish Baroque Music (1992)

FrontCover1In many works, Spanish Baroque music is a mixture of both school and popular music. Rhythms, color, instrumentation, melody and even the harmonic support have a little arabian touch. It developed mostly through popular music, not court music. Then, it was assimilated into the Spanish tradition. The 18th century Spanish were still impressed by the polyphony of the 16th century and continued to compose in that style.
Spanish composers such as Sebastián Durón (1660-1716), Antonio Literes (1673-1747) and José de Torres (c.1670-1738) used combined rhythms. Literes have a quartet of four voices, each singing a different rhythm with accents falling in different places. Many Spanish composers at that time were not satisfied with the rhythm of the bass and the voice, and added a lot of rhythms with the continuo and the percussion.
Complex rhythms which include a flamenco drum player, for example, recreate this atmosphere. The rythmic changes in Spanish baroque music are constant. The pizzicato string continuo played like guitars, the castanets, the descending tetrachords typical of the malagueña mixed with classic galant always excite the listener. (by geocities.ws)

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Al Ayre Español was founded in 1988 by Eduardo López Banzo with the objective of avoiding the mistaken clichés that often surrounded the performance of Spanish baroque music. The spirit of the ensemble made this possible thanks to musicological rigor, performance excellence and with the main purpose of giving new breath to music from the past, making them appear as recent compositions, and then offering them to the contemporary audience.

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Personnel:
Al Ayre Español conducted by Eduardo López Banzo

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Tracklist:

Antonio de Literes – Ha Del Rústico PastorAntonio de Literes:
01. Introducción 1.42
02. Recitado – Aria 3.56
03. Recitado – Aria 4.06
04. Recitado – Minuete – Grave 3.46

Anonymous:
05 Pascalles I-II 3.41

Joaquín Martínez de la Roca: Los Desagravios De Troya;
06 Despacio – Solo Con Violines – Recitado – Seguidillas 3.09
07 Recitado – Solo Con Violines – Seguidillas 2.20
08. Aria – Recitado – Solo Con Violines – Recitado – Seguidillas – Minue 5.29
09. Primera Jornada: Recitado – Aria 6.04
10. Segunda Jornado: Recitado – Coplas 4.28

Francisco José de Castro – Sonata Prima:
11. Preludio 2.10
12 Allemanda 1.46
13. Corrente 1.28
14 Giga 1.09
15. Minue 0.47

José de Torres Martínez Bravo – !O, Quién Pudiera Alcanzar!:
16. Aria 3.45
17. Recitado – Aria 3.13
18. Despacio 2.38
19. Fuga 1:17
20. Recitado – Aria 3.20
21. Grave 1.53

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Gerald Garcia – Camerata Cassovia – Peter Breiner ‎– Baroque Guitar Favourites (1993)

FrontCover1“Baroque Guitar Favourites”: Arrangements for Guitar of Music by Antonio Vivaldi (Trio Sonatas RV 82 and RV 85; Lute Concerto RV 93; Violin Concerto RV 277) and by Johann Sebastian Bach (Harpsichord Concerto BWV 1052). All arrangements by Gerald Garcia. Performed by Gerald Garcia, guitar, and members of the Camerata Cassovia, directed by Peter Breiner. Recorded at the House of Arts in Kosice, Slovakia, in June 1990. Music notes by Gerald Garcia (not, as stated on the cover, by Keith Anderson). Released in 1992 as Naxos 8.550274. Total playing time: 75’23”.

Over the last 20 years, the Naxos label has done a great deal to obtain its reputation as one of the leading classical guitar labels. Its very first guitarist was Gerald Garcia, who was not slow to show the way forward by extending the rather limited guitar repertoire by making arrangements of pieces originally written for other instruments. This is what he has done here, too: None of the music on this disc was written for guitar, it is all arranged by Garcia himself, who plays a modern guitar and definitely not a baroque instrument. This rather makes the title of the disc a misnomer: no baroque guitar, no guitar music at all in the original, and certainly no guitar favourites as these arrangements were only made shortly before the disc was recorded! It would have been more to the point to entitle the whole: “Baroque Favourites arranged for Modern Guitar”, but I suppose the marketing strategists wouldn’t have liked that very much!

Gerald Garcia

What we do get to hear here is some very pleasant, tuneful, harmonic baroque melodies in which the part of the main soloist (lute, violin, harpsichord) is replaced by Garcia’s skilful and tasteful guitar-playing which is, in its turn, put very much in the forefront by the engineer. For the concertos, the necessary accompaniment is by the Camerata Cassovia, a chamber ensemble taken from members of the Slovak State Philharmonic of Kosice in Eastern Slovakia; the higher string parts sound quite acceptable, while I found the lower strings (the “basso continuo”) to be rather dull and uninspired. For the Bach, this continuo includes a harpsichord, providing a sonic background that does not let the listener forget that it is an arrangement of a harpsichord concerto that he is listening to. The Vivaldi trio sonatas were originally for violin, lute and continuo, and they are here played with the guitar as a suitable replacement for the lute, but with a viola d’amore in place of the violin, a decision which not only subordinates the string playing to the guitar, but which also sounds quite pleasing. Unfortunately, the strictures on the basso continuo apply here, too: Pavol Gimcik, cello, and Maria Lickova, modern harpsichord, provide nothing more than the absolutely necessary accompanying chords, so that it is definitely better to concentrate on Gerald Garcia’s delightful guitar playing.

Peter Breiner

This is definitely music that you can listen to for hours on end in the background. If you are not worried about historical authenticity and love the sound of the classical guitar, and if you are prepared to accept the rather lame continuo accompaniment, you will find this disc most enjoyable. Vivaldi’s and Bach’s music is so optimistic and so harmonically rich that it can bear any number of such arrangements. (by Leslie Richford)

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Personnel:
Gerald Garcia (guitar)
Pavol Gimcik (cello)
Maria Licková (harpsichord)
Karol Petroczi (viola d’amore)
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Camerata Cassovia conducted by Peter Breiner

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Tracklist:

Antonio Vivaldi: Violin Concerto in E Minor, RV 277, “Il Favorito”:
01. I. Allegro 5.22
02. II. Andante 5.56
03. III. Allegro 5.22

Antonio Vivaldi: Trio Sonata in C Major, RV 82:
04. I. Allegro non molto 4.05
05. II. Larghetto – Lento 4.13
06. III. Allegro 2.33

Antonio Vivaldi: Trio Sonata in G Minor, RV 85:
07. I. Andante molto 4.14
08. II. Larghetto 2.40
09. III. Allegro 2.19

Antonio Vivaldi: Lute Concerto in D Major, RV 93:
10. I. Allegro giusto 3.45
11. II. Largo 4.38
12. III. Allegro 2.31

Johann Sebastian Bach: Harpsichord Concerto in D Minor, BWV 1052:
13. I. Allegro 9.14
14. II. Adagio 8.21
15. III. Allegro 10.10

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The English Concert + Trevor Pinnock – A Grad Concert Of Music – English Baroque Concerti (1979)

LPFrontCover1Archiv Produktion released A Grand Concert of Musick in 1985, and the performances by Trevor Pinnock and the English Concert are a high point in the label’s catalog. This album of concertos by John Stanley, Thomas Arne, Francesco Geminiani, Pieter Hellendaal, and Charles Avison, along with a symphony by William Boyce, provides a quick survey of some of the music that was popular in England in the late Baroque era.

Performing on original instruments and led from the harpsichord by Pinnock, the ensemble plays with crisp articulation, vigorous bowing, and bright tone colors, and the strings are surrounded by a wonderful aural halo produced by resonant acoustics. Pinnock and the English Baroque Concert took pride not only in playing in authentic period style, but also in providing the historical context behind the music, so this program represents musical activity centered in London circa 1730, when the English national style was developing in the wake of Purcell and contemporaneously with Handel. (by Blair Sanderson)

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Personnel:
The English Concert conducted by Simon Standage
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Trevor Pinnock (harpsichord)

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Tracklist:

John Stanley: Concerto in G major, Op. 2 No. 3:
01. Adagio – Allegro
02. Andante 1.43
03. Allegro

Thomas Arne: Concerto in G minor, for keyboard and orchestra:
04. Largo – Allegro con spirito 5.39
05. Adagio 1.20
06. Vivace 4.34

William Boyce: Symphony in B flat Major:
07. Allegro 2.37
08. Moderato e dolce 2.21
09. Allegro 2.02

Francesco Geminiani:
10. Concerto grosso in D minor (after Corelli: La Follia Variations, Op. 5 No. 12) 12.23

Pieter Hellendaal: Concerto in E flat major, Op. 3 No. 4
11. Grave sostenuto 3.57
12. Alla breve 1.40
13. Affettuoso 1.33
14. Presto 1.23
15. Pastorale 3.01

Charles Avison: Concerto grosso No. 9 in C major/A minor (after Domenico Scarlatti: Lessons for the Harpsichord)

16. Largo 2.10
17.Con spirito – Andante – Con spirito
18. Siciliana 3.17
19. Allegro 3.43Label1

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Peter Maxwell Davies – Piano Concerto; Worldes Blis (2013)

FrontCover1As with most releases in the Naxos series on Maxwell Davies, these recordings were previously issued on Collins Classics, Worldes Blis in 1993 and the Piano Concerto in 1998. On the back cover CD insert, there Read more The Sunday Telegraph to proclaim the concerto as “one of the most attractive and immediately likeable piano concertos to appear for some time.” Although I liked it, I would never make such a claim. This piece, though not as astringent or cerebral as some of Maxwell Davies’s music, is far from “immediately likeable.” It sounds, rather, like Prokofiev swathed in the harmonies of Berio or, at times, Ligeti, which makes it interesting but certainly not immediately appealing to the average listener. Crushed brass chords underscore the piano’s often atonal tinkling, and even attempts at producing melodic themes challenge the listener with their atonal or bitonal harmonic clashes.

Again, the liner notes belie what one actually hears, describing “the tense ‘Scots-snap’ rhythms” and “A vivacious dance.” If you can dance to this stuff, you must have three legs and be hardwired in your brain for shifting cross-rhythms. Again, this is not a criticism of the music, which I found to be extremely interesting and among Maxwell Davies’s best works, but it is a very challenging piece with almost foreboding harmonies, and to pretend otherwise is to deceive the potential listener.

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Since the concerto was dedicated to pianist Kathryn Stott, who plays it here, it is almost a foregone conclusion that her playing would be quite fine, and it is. I found her to be more of a cerebral rather than an emotional player, at least from this recording, and thus I’d have to say that the music suits her perfectly. Maxwell Davies appears to have assigned the most emotional passages to the orchestra, which keeps up an almost unbroken undercurrent of unease and menace, while the piano soloist merely overlays her commentary on this canvas. As a result I found this piece to be much more in line with Bartók’s Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta despite the very different melodic and harmonic style. The middle-movement Adagio , which is ironically the briefest of the three movements, presents the listener with a moment of relative inertia—the music barely, almost imperceptibly, nudges forward—but not of any calm or comfort. (Oddly enough, the use of pizzicato bass lines under the piano here almost, but not quite, put it in the realm of Third Stream music.) The third movement returns us to the unease of the first.

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Worldes Blis, written in 1966-69, is based on a 13th-century plainchant yet is entirely instrumental. Here, Maxwell Davies’s flirtation with the kind of sound world being created by Ligeti is all the more obvious; even the use of a harp keeps the textures in the low range for much of the piece, and it seems to me to be more concerned with texture than anything else, though the slowly rising melody that begins in a solo cello is in some ways more melodic than anything in the concerto. Much of Worldes Blis has the same kind of rhythmic stasis and aura of unease that one hears in the middle movement of the piano concerto. It is, however, an interesting experiment in sound textures and suspension of time, so to speak, and it works very well. Slowly, almost imperceptibly at first, the music becomes busier, yet these “ Allegro s” will never be confused with a Mahler scherzo or a Prokofiev symphonic finale.

As the music becomes busier, it also becomes denser both harmonically and rhythmically, pulling the listener along but not quite engaging one except to admire the cleverness of his construction. In brief, an interesting contribution to the growing Maxwell Davies collection. If only Naxos would do the same for the music of Nancy Van de Vate! —FANFARE: Lynn René Bayley,

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Personnel:
Kathryn Scott (piano)
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The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Peter Maxwell Davies

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Tracklist:

Piano Concerto (1997) (36:02)
01. I – Moderato – Più Mosso – Andante – Più Mosso – Andante 17.22
02. II – Adagio 8.35
03. III – Allegro 10.04

Worldes Blis (1966-69) (42:23)
04. Lento Recitando – Lentissimo 18.50
05. L’ Istesso Tempo 4.31
06. Allegro 3.30
07. Poco Più Mosso 6.19
08. Allegro 1.46
09. Lento 7.27

Music composed by Peter Maxwell Davies

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Balázs Szokolay – Lyric Pieces (Edvard Grieg) (1990)

FrontCover1Lyric Pieces (Norwegian: Lyriske stykker) is a collection of 66 short pieces for solo piano written by Edvard Grieg. They were published in 10 volumes, from 1867 (Op. 12) to 1901 (Op. 71). The collection includes several of his best known pieces, such as Wedding Day at Troldhaugen (Bryllupsdag på Troldhaugen), To Spring (Til våren), March of the Trolls (Trolltog), and Butterfly (Sommerfugl).

The theme of the first piece in the set, Arietta, was one of the composer’s favorite melodies. He used it to complete the cycle in his very last lyric piece, Remembrances (Efterklang) — this time as a waltz. (by wikipedia)

This is a very pleasing assortment from among Grieg’s 66 short Lyric Pieces, written between 1866-1891. There were 6-8 pieces in each of the 10 “books”, and this collection of 30 pieces contains selections from 9 of the books (there is no selection from Book 62 for TitlePagesome reason).

Each and every one presented here is a pure delight, and represent Grieg’s life-long desire to create a true Norwegian music genre derived from the folk music, dances, stories and natural environment of Norway. Every piece is evocative and the entire disc is delightful, thanks to the colorful and imaginative piano of Balazs Szokolay.

These pieces were recorded in 1989 at the Italian Institute in Budapest, and first released in Germany in 1990  The DDD recording quality was excellent and stands the test of time.
Since his first international appearance in 1979 with Peter Nagy at the Salzburg Interforum, pianist Szokolay has been a successful contender who has won many important awards and who maintains a steady following. His piano is energetic and expressive, and he is featured in over 90 albums on the Naxos label. As he is not yet 60 years old, we can hope for more from this productive and interesting artist. (by Philly Galon)

Balázs Szokolay

Balázs Szokolay
Personnel:
Balázs Szokolay (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Arietta, Op. 12, No. 1  1.09
02. Halling (Norwegian Dance), Op. 38, No. 4  0.46
03. Melodie, Op. 38, No. 3  1,40
04. Melodie, Op. 47, No. 3  2.39
05. Halling (Norwegian Dance), Op. 47, No. 4  1.12
06. Fra Ungdomsdagene (From Years Of Youth). Op. 65, No. 1  4.27
07. Canon, Op. 38, No. 8  4,31
08. Småtrold (Puck), Op. 71, No. 3  1.42
09. Walzer, Op. 38, No. 7  1.01
10. Matrosernes Opsang (Sailor’s Song), Op. 68, No. 1  1.04
11. Springtanz, Op. 38, No. 5  1.20
12. Halling (Norwegian Dance), Op. 71, No. 5  2.43
13. Volksweise (Folk-Song), Op. 38, No. 2  1.33
14. Elegie, Op. 38, No. 6  2.10
15. Gangar (Norwegian March), Op. 54, No. 2  2.42
16. De Var Engang (Once Upon A Time), Op. 71, No. 1  3.28
17. Einsamer Wanderer (Solitary Wanderer), Op. 43, No. 2  1.36
18. Elverdans (Elves’ Dance), Op. 12, No. 4  0.42
19. Vals, Op. 12, No. 2  1.40
20. Folkewise (Folk-Song), Op. 12, No. 5  1.11
21. Skovstilhed (Peace Of The Wood), Op. 71, No. 4  4.58
22. Stambogsblad (Album-Leaf), Op.12, No. 7  1.11
23. Valse-Impromptu, Op. 47, No. 1  2.59
24. Forbi (Gone), Op. 71, No. 6  2.10
25. Sie Tanzt (She Dances), Op. 57, No. 5  2.43
26. Albumsblatt (Album-Leaf), Op. 47, No. 2  2.58
27. Sommeraften (Summer Evening), Op. 71, No. 2  2.24
28. For Dine Födder (At Your Feet), Op. 68, No. 3  2.22
29. Valse Mélancolique, Op. 68, No. 6  3.24
30. Efterklang (Remembrance) , Op. 71, No. 7 1.45

Music written by Edvard Grieg
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Christopher Wilson – Early Venetian Lute Music (1995)

FrontCover1This is a wonderful CD! Beautifully recorded in St. Andrews Church in Toddington, England! The quiet melodies of each piece are different enough that you will never get bored playing it over and over again! The next time you have a bad day, or come home from work some night with frayed nerves, try this!

Turn out all of the lights, light a candle in a jar, preferably a scented one (sounds awfully 60’s doesn’t it!) put this CD on the stereo, get comfortable, let your mind drift back to the 16th century, watch the candle light flicker on the walls and ceiling and feel yourself relax!!!

This CD is a lot cheaper than a bottle of tranquilizers or a visit to the shrink! BEWARE: Don’t substitute Lute music played on an acoustic guitar! A Lute has different dynamics, nuances and colours! Good Listening To You!!! (by John F. Coughlin)

ChristopherWilson01I discovered this CD quite by accident. I had been listening to two solo albums by Jan Akkerman, at one time the guitarist in Focus. Amid all the rock and jazz-rock tunes, it was clear that his solo lute recordings were much the best aspects of the two CDs. I resolved to buy a John Dowland CD, and this album also came up in the search.
This has quickly become the favourite of my lute CDs. The others feature singing — usually by a counter-tenor — and while that is pleasant enough, it places the music firmly in another time.
Without the singing, we can place this album almost anywhere we want: ambient, rock, classical, music to work to. There’s a nostalgic quality to several of the pieces here: they are so close to musical scales that they distantly remind me, as a child of the 1960s, of the themes to ‘Camberwick Green’ and ‘Trumpton’. This is music that it is impossible to dislike. (by Gavin Wilsonon)

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Personnel:
Christopher Wilson (lute)
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Shirley Rumsey (lute duetist)

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Tracklist:

Joan Ambrosio Dalza:
01. Calata ala spagnola 2.06
02. Tastar de corde, Recercar dietro 2.13
03. Pavana alla venetiana 3.26
Francesco Spinacino:
04. Rececar 1.37
05. Jay pris amours 3.33
Franciscus Bossinensis;
06. Recercar 0.28
Francesco Spinacino:
07. La Bernardina de Josquin 2.59
Vincenzo Capirola:
08. Recercar quinto 3.45
09. Canto bello 1.36
10. La villanella 1.29
11. O mia cieca e dura sorte 3.47
12. Che farala che dirala (after Don Michele Vicentino) 2.00
13. Non mi negar signora (After Serafino dall’ Aquila) 1.01
14. Recercar 0.50
15, Pavana 2.16
16. Calata 1.46
Franciscus Bossinensis;
17. Recercar 0.41
Francesco Spinacino:
18. Je ne fay 4.10
19. Recercar 2.54
20. De tous biens 3.52
Joan Ambrosio Dalza:
21. Tastar de corde, Recercar dietro 1.09
22. lata ala spagnola 2.33
23. Poi che volse la mia stella (after Bartolomeo Tromboncino) 2.43
24. Laudato dio 2.43
25. Saltarello and Piva 4.54

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