Gordon Chin – Cello Concerto + Symphony No.3 (“Taiwan”) (2015)

FrontCover1Gordon Chin is one of Taiwan’s leading composers, and increasingly honoured by commissions and performances from major ensembles in North America, Asia and Europe. Featuring an array of exotic Chinese percussion instruments, Symphony No. 3 ‘Taiwan’ is a dramatically powerful work cast in three movements which explore his native country’s turbulent history. Specific literary quotations from Shakespeare, Blaise Pascal and Samuel Johnson elucidate the expressive moods of the three-movement Cello Concerto No. 1. — naxos.com

Gordon Chin is one of Taiwan’s leading composers, music director of the Yin-Qi Symphony Orchestra and Chorus in Taipei, and a faculty member at the National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU). As a composer he has received commissions and performances from North America (where he studied), Asia and Europe. Now in his late fifties, he has produced a number of substantial compositions including an opera, four symphonies, numerous concertos and choral works. These two impressive examples of his music were written ten years apart and are here given their world premiere recordings.

Shao-Chia Lu

The three-movement Cello Concerto No.1 is placed first. Some literary quotations from Shakespeare, Pascal and Dr. Johnson, quoted by Chin in his own booklet note, aim to elucidate the expressive moods of each movement. I am not sure they are especially helpful in that respect, but the music hardly needs any literary support, so direct is its strength and immediate appeal. It is on a large scale and full of arresting orchestral incident. Its modernist idiom will present few problems to admirers of the cello concertos of Martinu or Shostakovich, for it is in an acerbically tonal style with many exotic effects, and punchy assertive gestures dominate. Yet this is clearly the statement of an individual voice. The orchestral colours are alluring and the cello solo is wide-ranging, idiomatic.

It has quite a few challenges for the player – all of which cellist Wen-Sinn Yang has mastered. His dazzling virtuosity serves the work rather than the other way around. One hopes this disc will encourage other cellists to look at the music.

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Symphony No.3 (subtitled Taiwan) is a dramatic work also cast in three movements, each of which explores the turbulent history of Chin’s native country. The first movement is subtitled Plunder, the second Dark Night and the third Upsurge. There are even motifs with such titles identified in the composer’s note, complete with musical illustrations. That first movement is almost a percussion extravaganza, becoming a timpani concerto at some points. The lyrical second movement draws upon a Taiwanese folk song, is punctuated by angry episodes and grows to a passionate climax. The finale pulls everything together in a satisfying way and leads to a heroic conclusion. The symphony is enjoyable and often striking, if at first slightly less compelling perhaps than the cello concerto. The performance of the excellent Taiwan Philharmonic under Shao-Chia Lü is certainly persuasive and sounds committed throughout.
The recording is very good, full and well-balanced with plenty of impact. This disc will appeal to anyone curious to know what can be made of the western classical tradition when its techniques and colours are expertly refracted through an East Asian lens. It is to be hoped that Naxos, whose second disc of Chin’s music this is will continue the series. The first disc is Naxos 8.570221: Double Concerto and Formosa Seasons. (Roy Westbrook)

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Gordon Shi-Wen Chin,(born 1957), a Taiwanese composer and conductor, is a member of the faculty of National Taiwan Normal University. He earned his doctoral degree at the Eastman School of Music under Christopher Rouse and Samuel Adler.[2] As one of Taiwan’s most prolific composers, his works have been performed by the Seattle Symphony Orchestra, San Diego Symphony Orchestra, and Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, as well as by ensembles in Tokyo (Euodia Orchestra), France (Ensemble 2e2m), the International Sejong Soloists (United States), and many others.[3] The Los Angeles Times has called him a “confident master of the Western modernistic large orchestral idiom used for dramatic rather than abstract purposes.” Chin is now the music director of the Yinqi Chorus & Orchestra (by wikipedia)

Gordon Chin

Personnel:
Wen-Sinn Yang (cello)
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Taiwan Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Shao-Chia Lu

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Tracklist:

Cello Concerto No. 1:
01. Allegro 13.29
02. Dreams Trapped Inside The Mirror 10.37
03. After Great Pain 11.38

Symphony No. 3, “Taiwan”;
04. Plunder 9.32
05. Dark Night 8.40
06. Upsurge 8.16

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Ensemble Villa Musica – Sextet & Grand Quintuor (Joachim Raff) (2003)

FrontCover1Joseph Joachim Raff (27 May 1822 – 24 or 25 June 1882) was a German-Swiss composer, teacher and pianist.

Raff was born in Lachen in Switzerland. His father, a teacher, had fled there from Württemberg in 1810 to escape forced recruitment into the military of that southwestern German state that had to fight for Napoleon in Russia. Joachim was largely self-taught in music, studying the subject while working as a schoolmaster in Schmerikon, Schwyz and Rapperswil. He sent some of his piano compositions to Felix Mendelssohn who recommended them to Breitkopf & Härtel for publication. They were published in 1844 and received a favourable review in Robert Schumann’s journal, the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik, which prompted Raff to go to Zürich and take up composition full-time.

In 1845, Raff walked to Basel to hear Franz Liszt play the piano. After a period in Stuttgart where he became friends with the conductor Hans von Bülow, he worked as Liszt’s assistant at Weimar from 1850 to 1853. During this time he helped Liszt in the orchestration of several of his works, claiming to have had a major part in orchestrating the symphonic poem Tasso.

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In 1851, Raff’s opera König Alfred was staged in Weimar, and five years later he moved to Wiesbaden where he largely devoted himself to composition. From 1878 he was the first Director of, and a teacher at, the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt. There he employed Clara Schumann and a number of other eminent musicians as teachers, and established a class specifically for female composers. (This was at a time when women composers were not taken very seriously.) His pupils there included Edward MacDowell and Alexander Ritter. See: List of music students by teacher: R to S#Joachim Raff.

He died in Frankfurt on the night of June 24/25, 1882. (by wikipedia)

Raff’s Piano Quintet was considered by Hans von Bülow to be one of the very greatest works in its medium, and he wasn’t wrong. Generously proportioned (37 minutes), expertly written, full of good tunes, and not a bit diffuse in its argument, it’s surely one of Raff01the great Romantic chamber works, and yet it’s barely known. The reason undoubtedly stems from the fact that Raff’s compositional fecundity has counted against him; but he was a gifted composer, and at his best, as here, he rivals anyone. The basic, A minor key and passionate contrasts of mood and tempo tell the whole story. Unlike so many “moderato” openings, this piece starts “Allegro mosso assai” and maintains its intensity right up to the final bar of the last movement, marked “Allegro bioso, patetico”. The Sextet in G minor is more pithy, but just as keenly felt, and beautifully textured. Raff’s expert orchestral writing has often been cited, usually in connection with his assisting Liszt in orchestrating his tone poems, but his talent in this area is no less evident in these chamber works. The Ensemble Villa Musica plays both pieces with all of the necessary enthusiasm and energy, and the players are gorgeously recorded. This is one of those discs that no true chamber music connoisseur can afford to miss. (by David Hurwitz)

Raff is one composer whose posthumous reputation has suffered enormously with his vast oeuvre almost completely forgotten. A recent revival of his symphonies on a variety of labels has shown that he has flair and charm if not always a top rank composer.

Dabringhaus & Grimm continually churns out precious chamber music gems that are fast becoming unique to the catalogue. This latest release is no exception and I would advise listeners who have found Raff’s symphonies enjoyable to sample some of his most exquisite chamber works.

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The Sextet, Op. 178 is probably the best work of the two recorded here with a highly enjoyable Allegro and a beautiful Larghetto, rather reminiscent of Beethoven’s 2nd Symphony. Raff uses colour and has a fine palette that makes the music all the more attractive especially in the final Allegro.

The Grand Quintet is an earlier work and at times, I do feel that the piano part is a mite boorish but other listeners may digress from that view! It would be safe to say that the Ensemble Villa Musica are ideal interpreters and that the disc will appeal to chamber music lovers who enjoy seeking out such rarities. (by Gerald Fenech)

Founded in 1990 in connection with the master classes of the state foundation Villa Musica in Mainz the Ensemble Villa Musica has earned an international reputation as one of the leading chamber music groups of our day. With always increasing enthusiasm the international music press has noticed the growth of an ensemble which is almost incomparable in its variety of instruments and repertoire.

Founded in 1990 in connection with the master classes of the state foundation Villa Musica in Mainz the Ensemble Villa Musica has earned an international reputation as one of the leading chamber music groups of our day. With always increasing enthusiasm the international music press has noticed the growth of an ensemble which is almost incomparable in its variety of instruments and repertoire.

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About 20 of Germany’s most renowned instrumentalists joined the group under the leadership of clarinetist Ulf Rodenhäuser. All of them were or still are first soloists in the great German orchestras and have taught for years as professors at German music academies Musicians such as the bassoonist Klaus Thunemann the cellist Martin Ostertag the violinist Thomas Brandis and the oboist Ingo Goritzki represent an unmistakably high standard of musical craftsmanship.

Aiming at the education of highly gifted young chamber musicians on the one hand, and at the performance and recording of forgotten masterworks of chamber music on the other hand, the ensemble has been able to contribute on many levels of German chamber music.

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In connection with the CD producers Dabringhaus und Grimm, they published an exemplary series of CDs containing French chamber music by Fauré‚ Saint-Saëns, and Milhaud, Chech Music by Janácek, Klein and Schulhoff, late Romantic German Music by Spohr and Reinecke, and especially the Chamber Music of Paul Hindemith. All of the CDs have been given highest rates by the critics, some of them have received international awards.

Of course, the Ensemble Villa Musica is also regularly performing in concert halls and at music festivals all over the world. In Rhineland-Palatinate, Stuttgart, and Munich it has established its own concert cycles

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Personnel:
Ensemble Villa Musica:

Sextet:
Nicolas Chumachenco (violin)
Michel Dispa (cello)
Chiara Morandi (violin)
Martin Ostertag (cello)
Enrique Santiago (alto)
Hariolf Schlichtig (alto)

Quintet:
Nicolas Chumachenco (violin)
Erika Geldsetzer (violin)
Martin Ostertag (cello)
Kalle Randalu (piano)
Enrique Santiago (alto)

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Tracklist:

String Sextet in G Minor, Op. 178;
01. Allegro 9:10
02. Allegro molto 4:07
03. Larghetto 10:22
04. Allegro 4:54

Grand Quintuor in A Minor, Op. 1075:
05. Allegro mosso assai 11:28
06. Allegro vivace, quasi presto 6:04
07. Andante, quasi larghetto mosso 11:54
08. Allegro brioso, patetico 7:42

Music written by Joachim Raff

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Gerald Garcia – Romantic Guitar Favourites (1992)

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Gerald Garcia (born 1949 in Hong Kong) is a classical guitarist and composer.

After studying chemistry at Oxford University, he became a professional musician, making his debut at the Wigmore Hall in London. His more than fifteen CDs have sold more than 30,000 copies worldwide. In addition, he has performed with other musicians including John Williams, Paco Peña and John Renbourn.

Garcia is also known as a composer, particularly for his Etudes Esquisses for guitar, GeraldGarciarecorded for Naxos Records by John Holmquist. He is musical director of the National Youth Guitar Ensemble.

Gerald Garcia lives in Oxford, where, according to his website, he enjoys “cooking, computer music, Taoist Yoga and conducting the odd chamber orchestra.”

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This beautifully studio-recorded disc from 1989 was, if I am correctly infomed, Gerald Garcia’s fifth CD for Naxos (following on from “Concierto de Aranjuez”, “Brazilian Portrait”, “Latin American Guitar Festival” and “Baroque Guitar Favourites”). It contains some of the “prettiest” music for classical guitar that I have ever heard, although I should add in the same breath that there is, in fact, no music for classical guitar at all on the disc – all the pieces here recorded are transcriptions of music for violin solo (Paganini’s Caprices), for violin and guitar (Paganini’s Grand Sonata), for piano (Mendelssohn’s Songs Without Words) and for voice and piano (Schubert’s Lieder). The Paganini and Mendelssohn appear to have been transcribed by Garcia himself, whereas the Schubert was congenially adapted for the instrument by Johann Kaspar Mertz, a 19th century Bohemian guitarist. The title of the CD, “Romantic Guitar Favourites”, is therefore a complete misnomer, but that in no way affects the enjoyment to be had from listening to what, to my non-expert ears at any rate, is some excellent guitar-playing in first-rate audio quality. The notes, written by Gerald Garcia himself, are brief but informative. (Leslie Richfordon)

Gerald Garcia has made an estimable series of CDs for Naxos, and this one is no exception. He has a beautiful sound for Romantic guitar music. His tone is large, his passage work never becomes coarse or astringent, and his overall conceptions are lush sounding and warm. The Mendelssohn and Schubert transcriptions are preformed with a great deal of delicacy, almost dreamy. The two Paganini Caprices are brilliant display pieces that Garcia dispatches with style and ease. As for the Paganini Sonata, it is an engrossing work that Garcia never lets sound heavy. Add a full spectrumed sound engineering picture, and you have a very appealing album. (David Saemannon)

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Personnel:
Gerald Garcia (guitar)

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Tracklist:

Niccolò Paganini:
01 Caprice Nº91 + Caprice Nº9

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy:
02. Venetian Boat Song I (Song Without Words Op. 19 Nº 6)
03. Song Without Words, Op.19 Nº4
04. Song Without Words, Op.53 Nº4
05. Song Without Words, Op.85 Nº2
06. Song Without Words, Op.62 Nº4
07. Venetian Boat Song II (Song Without Words Op. 30 Nº 6)
08. Allegro Risoluto

Niccolò Paganini:
09. Romanza

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy:
10. Andantino Variato
11. Caprice Nº24

Franz Schubert:
12. Praise Of Tears
13. Love’s Messenger
14. Serenade
15. Delay
16. Fisher Maiden
17. The Post

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More Gerald Garcia:

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Sergei Prokofiev – Peter And The Wolf (Herbert von Karajan – narrated by Peter Ustinov) (1959)

FrontCover1Peter and the Wolf, Op. 67, a ‘symphonic fairy tale for children’, is a musical composition written by Sergei Prokofiev in 1936. The narrator tells a children’s story, while the orchestra illustrates it. It is Prokofiev’s most frequently performed work, and one of the most frequently performed works in the entire classical repertoire. It has been recorded many times.

In 1936, Sergei Prokofiev was commissioned by Natalya Sats, the director of the Central Children’s Theatre in Moscow, to write a musical symphony for children. Sats and Prokofiev had become acquainted after he visited her theatre with his sons several times. The intent was to introduce children to the individual instruments of the orchestra. The first draft of the libretto was about a Young Pioneer (the Soviet version of a Boy Scout) called Peter who rights a wrong by challenging an adult. (This was a common theme in propaganda aimed at children in the USSR at the time.) However, Prokofiev was dissatisfied with the rhyming text produced by Antonina Sakonskaya, a then popular children’s author. Prokofiev wrote a new version where Peter captures a wolf. As well as promoting desired Pioneer virtues such as vigilance, bravery and resourcefulness, the plot illustrates Soviet themes such as the stubbornness of the un-Bolshevik older generation (the grandfather) and the triumph of Man (Peter) taming Nature (the wolf).

Sergej Prokofjew
Prokofiev produced a version for the piano in under a week, finishing it on April 15. The orchestration was finished on April 24. The work debuted at a children’s concert in the main hall of the Moscow Conservatory with the Moscow Philharmonic on 2 May 1936. However, Sats was ill and the substitute narrator inexperienced, and the performance failed to attract much attention.[1][3][4][5] Later that month a much more successful performance with Sats narrating was given at the Moscow Pioneers Palace. The American premiere took place in March 1938, with Prokofiev himself conducting the Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall, Boston with Richard Hale narrating. By that time Sats was serving a sentence in the gulag, where she was sent after her lover Marshal Mikhail Tukhachevsky was shot in June 1937.

Peter, a Young Pioneer, lives at his grandfather’s home in a forest clearing. One day, Peter goes out into the clearing, leaving the garden gate open, and the duck that lives in the yard takes the opportunity to go swimming in a pond nearby. The duck starts arguing with a little bird (“What kind of bird are you if you can’t fly?” – “What kind of bird are you if you can’t swim?”). Peter’s pet cat stalks them quietly, and the bird—warned by Peter—flies to safety in a tall tree while the duck swims to safety in the middle of the pond.

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Peter’s grandfather scolds him for being outside in the meadow alone (“Suppose a wolf came out of the forest?”), and, when he defies him, saying: “Boys like me are not afraid of wolves”, his grandfather takes him back into the house and locks the gate. Soon afterwards “a big, grey wolf” does indeed come out of the forest. The cat quickly climbs into a tree, but the duck, who has jumped out of the pond, is chased, overtaken, and swallowed by the wolf.

IllustrationPeter fetches a rope and climbs over the garden wall into the tree. He asks the bird to fly around the wolf’s head to distract it, while he lowers a noose and catches the wolf by its tail. The wolf struggles to get free, but Peter ties the rope to the tree and the noose only gets tighter.

Some hunters, who have been tracking the wolf, come out of the forest ready to shoot, but Peter gets them to help him take the wolf to a zoo in a victory parade (the piece was first performed for an audience of Young Pioneers during May Day celebrations) that includes himself, the bird, the hunters leading the wolf, the cat, and grumpy grumbling Grandfather (“What if Peter hadn’t caught the wolf? What then?”)

In the story’s ending, the listener is told: “If you listen very carefully, you’ll hear the duck quacking inside the wolf’s belly, because the wolf in his hurry had swallowed her alive.”
Performance directions

Prokofiev produced detailed performance notes in both English and Russian for Peter and the Wolf. According to the English version:

Each character of this tale is represented by a corresponding instrument in the orchestra: the bird by a flute, the duck by an oboe, the cat by a clarinet playing staccato in a low register, the grandfather by a bassoon, the wolf by three horns, Peter by the string quartet, the shooting of the hunters by the kettle drums and bass drum. Before an orchestral performance it is desirable to show these instruments to the children and to play on them the corresponding leitmotivs. Thereby, the children learn to distinguish the sonorities of the instruments during the performance of this tale. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a nive version with the great Peter Ustinov as narrator and Herbert von Karajan as the conductor of The Philharmonia Orchestra.

What a nicy musical fairy tale !

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Personnel:
Peter Ustinov (narrator)
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The Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by Herbert von Karajan

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Tracklist:
01. Peter And The Wolf (Prokofiev) (Part 1) 14.23
02. Peter And The Wolf (Prokofiev) (Part 2) 14.34
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03. Toy Symphony (Haydn) 11.01

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Al Ayre Español – A Century Of Spanish Baroque Music (1992)

FrontCover1In many works, Spanish Baroque music is a mixture of both school and popular music. Rhythms, color, instrumentation, melody and even the harmonic support have a little arabian touch. It developed mostly through popular music, not court music. Then, it was assimilated into the Spanish tradition. The 18th century Spanish were still impressed by the polyphony of the 16th century and continued to compose in that style.
Spanish composers such as Sebastián Durón (1660-1716), Antonio Literes (1673-1747) and José de Torres (c.1670-1738) used combined rhythms. Literes have a quartet of four voices, each singing a different rhythm with accents falling in different places. Many Spanish composers at that time were not satisfied with the rhythm of the bass and the voice, and added a lot of rhythms with the continuo and the percussion.
Complex rhythms which include a flamenco drum player, for example, recreate this atmosphere. The rythmic changes in Spanish baroque music are constant. The pizzicato string continuo played like guitars, the castanets, the descending tetrachords typical of the malagueña mixed with classic galant always excite the listener. (by geocities.ws)

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Al Ayre Español was founded in 1988 by Eduardo López Banzo with the objective of avoiding the mistaken clichés that often surrounded the performance of Spanish baroque music. The spirit of the ensemble made this possible thanks to musicological rigor, performance excellence and with the main purpose of giving new breath to music from the past, making them appear as recent compositions, and then offering them to the contemporary audience.

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Personnel:
Al Ayre Español conducted by Eduardo López Banzo

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Tracklist:

Antonio de Literes – Ha Del Rústico PastorAntonio de Literes:
01. Introducción 1.42
02. Recitado – Aria 3.56
03. Recitado – Aria 4.06
04. Recitado – Minuete – Grave 3.46

Anonymous:
05 Pascalles I-II 3.41

Joaquín Martínez de la Roca: Los Desagravios De Troya;
06 Despacio – Solo Con Violines – Recitado – Seguidillas 3.09
07 Recitado – Solo Con Violines – Seguidillas 2.20
08. Aria – Recitado – Solo Con Violines – Recitado – Seguidillas – Minue 5.29
09. Primera Jornada: Recitado – Aria 6.04
10. Segunda Jornado: Recitado – Coplas 4.28

Francisco José de Castro – Sonata Prima:
11. Preludio 2.10
12 Allemanda 1.46
13. Corrente 1.28
14 Giga 1.09
15. Minue 0.47

José de Torres Martínez Bravo – !O, Quién Pudiera Alcanzar!:
16. Aria 3.45
17. Recitado – Aria 3.13
18. Despacio 2.38
19. Fuga 1:17
20. Recitado – Aria 3.20
21. Grave 1.53

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Gerald Garcia – Camerata Cassovia – Peter Breiner ‎– Baroque Guitar Favourites (1993)

FrontCover1“Baroque Guitar Favourites”: Arrangements for Guitar of Music by Antonio Vivaldi (Trio Sonatas RV 82 and RV 85; Lute Concerto RV 93; Violin Concerto RV 277) and by Johann Sebastian Bach (Harpsichord Concerto BWV 1052). All arrangements by Gerald Garcia. Performed by Gerald Garcia, guitar, and members of the Camerata Cassovia, directed by Peter Breiner. Recorded at the House of Arts in Kosice, Slovakia, in June 1990. Music notes by Gerald Garcia (not, as stated on the cover, by Keith Anderson). Released in 1992 as Naxos 8.550274. Total playing time: 75’23”.

Over the last 20 years, the Naxos label has done a great deal to obtain its reputation as one of the leading classical guitar labels. Its very first guitarist was Gerald Garcia, who was not slow to show the way forward by extending the rather limited guitar repertoire by making arrangements of pieces originally written for other instruments. This is what he has done here, too: None of the music on this disc was written for guitar, it is all arranged by Garcia himself, who plays a modern guitar and definitely not a baroque instrument. This rather makes the title of the disc a misnomer: no baroque guitar, no guitar music at all in the original, and certainly no guitar favourites as these arrangements were only made shortly before the disc was recorded! It would have been more to the point to entitle the whole: “Baroque Favourites arranged for Modern Guitar”, but I suppose the marketing strategists wouldn’t have liked that very much!

Gerald Garcia

What we do get to hear here is some very pleasant, tuneful, harmonic baroque melodies in which the part of the main soloist (lute, violin, harpsichord) is replaced by Garcia’s skilful and tasteful guitar-playing which is, in its turn, put very much in the forefront by the engineer. For the concertos, the necessary accompaniment is by the Camerata Cassovia, a chamber ensemble taken from members of the Slovak State Philharmonic of Kosice in Eastern Slovakia; the higher string parts sound quite acceptable, while I found the lower strings (the “basso continuo”) to be rather dull and uninspired. For the Bach, this continuo includes a harpsichord, providing a sonic background that does not let the listener forget that it is an arrangement of a harpsichord concerto that he is listening to. The Vivaldi trio sonatas were originally for violin, lute and continuo, and they are here played with the guitar as a suitable replacement for the lute, but with a viola d’amore in place of the violin, a decision which not only subordinates the string playing to the guitar, but which also sounds quite pleasing. Unfortunately, the strictures on the basso continuo apply here, too: Pavol Gimcik, cello, and Maria Lickova, modern harpsichord, provide nothing more than the absolutely necessary accompanying chords, so that it is definitely better to concentrate on Gerald Garcia’s delightful guitar playing.

Peter Breiner

This is definitely music that you can listen to for hours on end in the background. If you are not worried about historical authenticity and love the sound of the classical guitar, and if you are prepared to accept the rather lame continuo accompaniment, you will find this disc most enjoyable. Vivaldi’s and Bach’s music is so optimistic and so harmonically rich that it can bear any number of such arrangements. (by Leslie Richford)

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Personnel:
Gerald Garcia (guitar)
Pavol Gimcik (cello)
Maria Licková (harpsichord)
Karol Petroczi (viola d’amore)
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Camerata Cassovia conducted by Peter Breiner

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Tracklist:

Antonio Vivaldi: Violin Concerto in E Minor, RV 277, “Il Favorito”:
01. I. Allegro 5.22
02. II. Andante 5.56
03. III. Allegro 5.22

Antonio Vivaldi: Trio Sonata in C Major, RV 82:
04. I. Allegro non molto 4.05
05. II. Larghetto – Lento 4.13
06. III. Allegro 2.33

Antonio Vivaldi: Trio Sonata in G Minor, RV 85:
07. I. Andante molto 4.14
08. II. Larghetto 2.40
09. III. Allegro 2.19

Antonio Vivaldi: Lute Concerto in D Major, RV 93:
10. I. Allegro giusto 3.45
11. II. Largo 4.38
12. III. Allegro 2.31

Johann Sebastian Bach: Harpsichord Concerto in D Minor, BWV 1052:
13. I. Allegro 9.14
14. II. Adagio 8.21
15. III. Allegro 10.10

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The English Concert + Trevor Pinnock – A Grad Concert Of Music – English Baroque Concerti (1979)

LPFrontCover1Archiv Produktion released A Grand Concert of Musick in 1985, and the performances by Trevor Pinnock and the English Concert are a high point in the label’s catalog. This album of concertos by John Stanley, Thomas Arne, Francesco Geminiani, Pieter Hellendaal, and Charles Avison, along with a symphony by William Boyce, provides a quick survey of some of the music that was popular in England in the late Baroque era.

Performing on original instruments and led from the harpsichord by Pinnock, the ensemble plays with crisp articulation, vigorous bowing, and bright tone colors, and the strings are surrounded by a wonderful aural halo produced by resonant acoustics. Pinnock and the English Baroque Concert took pride not only in playing in authentic period style, but also in providing the historical context behind the music, so this program represents musical activity centered in London circa 1730, when the English national style was developing in the wake of Purcell and contemporaneously with Handel. (by Blair Sanderson)

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Personnel:
The English Concert conducted by Simon Standage
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Trevor Pinnock (harpsichord)

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Tracklist:

John Stanley: Concerto in G major, Op. 2 No. 3:
01. Adagio – Allegro
02. Andante 1.43
03. Allegro

Thomas Arne: Concerto in G minor, for keyboard and orchestra:
04. Largo – Allegro con spirito 5.39
05. Adagio 1.20
06. Vivace 4.34

William Boyce: Symphony in B flat Major:
07. Allegro 2.37
08. Moderato e dolce 2.21
09. Allegro 2.02

Francesco Geminiani:
10. Concerto grosso in D minor (after Corelli: La Follia Variations, Op. 5 No. 12) 12.23

Pieter Hellendaal: Concerto in E flat major, Op. 3 No. 4
11. Grave sostenuto 3.57
12. Alla breve 1.40
13. Affettuoso 1.33
14. Presto 1.23
15. Pastorale 3.01

Charles Avison: Concerto grosso No. 9 in C major/A minor (after Domenico Scarlatti: Lessons for the Harpsichord)

16. Largo 2.10
17.Con spirito – Andante – Con spirito
18. Siciliana 3.17
19. Allegro 3.43Label1

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