Teaze – One Night Stand (1979)

FrontCover1.jpgThe story of Teaze is one of unbridled success in foreign lands, yet often a constant struggle at times for mere recognition on their native soil. They were formed in Windsor, Ontario in 1975 by Brian Danter on bass guitar and vocals, guitarists Mark Bradac and Chuck Price, and Mike Kozak on drums.

“In the beginning, Teaze played hardly any bars – but highschools – which were still the rage then. We really didn’t play clubs period,” Bradac said.

Powered by a heavy but no-nonsense approach, they honed their sound while playing mostly at highschools, and were signed to Stan Whitcher Management, along with Mel Shaw from Stampeders fame. “Mel was the first to put us on out on exclusively on a label called Force One Records, distributed by London Records,” he added.

Their self-titled debut album was in the stores in ’77, but failed to make a dent in the top 40 charts. Still, driven by straight-forward production, the record was as raw a sound as one could capture in a studio, as evidenced by the tracks “Rockin With The Music”, co-written by George Young – older brother and producer of Ac/Dc’s Angus & Malcolm, “Hot To Trot,” and “Boys’ Night Out”. They caught the attention of Bob Rags at Terry Flood Management, and the group was signed to Aquarius records in 1977, who re-released the album.

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Their follow-up, ON THE LOOSE, was released early the next year and although still holding true to the band’s simple approach, the record showed a maturity in the writing and featured the rockers “Nobody’s Fool” and a re-make of “Gonna Have A Good Time Tonight.” Also noteable were the title track, “Ready To Move,” and “Sweet Misery.” It was the band’s only ever hit single, and the tender piano and acoustic guitar driven ballad also showcased their versatility.

The group moved operations from Windsor to Montreal the next year and continued touring eastern & central Canada and in the US, but still couldn’t seem to get their ‘big break’. This all changed for Teaze in the fall of 1978 when they travelled to Japan and were met with sold out stadiums and mobs at the airports. But the jury was still out as to whether or not Teaze simply cashed in on rock and roll starved Japanese kids after the likes of KISS, BTO and Cheap Trick had already paved the way. Whatever the reason, the reception of Teaze in Japan was almost comparable to the reception the Beatles or Rolling Stones enjoyed in the United States. Their ten day tour of the Orient led to 1979’s live album, TOUR OF JAPAN.

Teaze02.jpgLater that year the band released their third studio album, ONE NIGHT STANDS. With Myles Goodwyn of April Wine (also on the Aquarius label) behind the helm, it showed a definite progression from its predecessors. Ranging from the typical ballad “Loose Change”, the record’s only single, to the straight forward – grab you by the balls “Back in Action” and “Young & Reckless”, ONE NIGHT STANDS was typical Teaze, but with a maturity. However the tour that followed was a disappointing failure, considering management’s expectations following the band’s success overseas.

The group cut BODY SHOTS in the summer of 1980, their final album. Though two singles were released, “Roses and Chrome” and “Living On The Edge”, the record still failed to garner enough radio interest to support another full-fledged attempt at cracking the North American market. Management at Aquarius by this time had decided that “Teazemania” was never going to catch on here and chose not to commit to any more records.

Now without a deal, Teaze continued to do arena and theatre dates in and around the Toronto area, but disbanded in 1981. Everyone went on to do individual projects and life outside of music. Bradac opened up a pawnshop, and eventually became so established in the business he landed a role on “Pawnathon Canada,” a TV show where experts buy people’s relics and memorabilia.

A ‘best of’ package titled A TASTE OF TEAZE was released in ’84 and the compilation OVER SIXTY MINUTES WITH TEAZE, the definitive collection with 17 tracks, followed in 1990. (by canadianbands.com)

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One Night Stands was the third album released by Teaze on the Aquarius Records label, and their debut release in the U.S. on Capitol. With the success of the live album, Tour of Japan, the Montreal-based band became one of the hottest Canadian acts of the late ’70s. For this U.S. debut album, all the stops were pulled out by the band’s management. Myles Goodwyn, from April Wine, was brought in for production and eight new songs were written by the bandmembers for the album. The songs were powerful hard rock numbers with intelligent lyrics and good choruses. The album had all of the right ingredients to make it a hit, but, despite this, the timing was just not right. Disco was dominating the charts, new wave music was becoming the current rage, and punk rock was rearing its ugly head. The music world in general was in turmoil and commercial styled hard rock was just not where it was at in 1979, causing the album to become a commercial failure. There was no single released from the album, and because of that Teaze failed to attract the attention it deserved. The failure of One Night Stands in the U.S. prompted Capitol Records to drop the band from its contract midway through the recording of a follow-up album. Teaze’s shot at international stardom had been dashed. The band was still signed to Aquarius Records in Canada, so there still was an outlet for the album they were working on, which was to be called Body Shots. (by Keith Pettipas)

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Teaze was a terrific band from Ontario, Canada that produced four studio albums in the late ’70s/early ’80s and—sadly and shamefully—generated only little more than a cult following here in America.

One Night Stands, the band’s third release, contains both slamming rockers (“Back In Action,” “Boys Night Out,” “Young and Reckless,” etc.) along with AOR-tinged songs (“Heartless World,” “Stay Here,” “Touch The Wind,” etc.), all of which undoubtedly repeat in one’s head upon initial hearing, and all mega-classics that should have made Teaze ultra-famous and ultra-rich.

With high quality in everything from songwriting to musicianship to production, this band should have been HUGE. Yes, it’s a “heartless world” indeed. (by zap_niles)

What as great album … listen to “Heartless World” … one of the finest Heavy Metal ballads ever !

Oh yes, the boys were hot !

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Personnel:
Marc Bradac (guitar, slide guitar, background vocals)
Brian Danter (bass, synthesizer, vocals)
Mike Kozak (drums, percussion)
Chuck Price (guitar, background vocals)
+
unknown saxophone player on 03.

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Tracklist:
01. Back In Action (Bradac/Danter/Kozak) 3.25
02. Young And Reckless (Bradac/Danter/Kozak) 3.55
03. Heartless World (Bradac/Kozak) 5.40
04. Boys Night Out (Bradac/Kozak) 4.07
05. Through The Years (Bradac/Danter/Price/Kozak) 4.10
06. Reach Out (Danter) 3.44
07. Stay Here (Bradac/Kozak) 3.33
08. Red Hot Ready (Bradac/Kozak) 3.22
09. Touch The Wind (Danter) 5.02

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You’re a living sin
You’re the harlequin in a one-act play
And you’ve given up
Even though you can’t say why
So your hero died back in 69
Well that’s no excuse
To go lose yourself in a FM headphone high
It’s a heartless world
It’s a heartless world

Have you had enough?
Are you going back to that crazy place?
Are you listening?
Am I talking to myself?
Well it’s sad to say but it’s just that way and it’ll
never change, never change
Have you won or lost?
You know it’s hard to tell
It’s a heartless world
It’s a heartless world
And some room to breathe may be all you need
to get on your feet
And the time to step outside and see outside and see the sky
Oo, no, no, no, it’s a heartless world
It’s a heartless world
Will you control me
Would you please hold me
Don’t let me show my vicious side

If you disown me
If you’ve outgrown me
I’ll change my name, and say goodbye