The Ray Charles Singers – Summertime (1957)

FrontCover1In June 1954, the Ray Charles Singers, a name bestowed on them by Perry Como, began recording a series of albums. Due to advances in recording technology, they were able to create a softer sound than had been heard before and this was the birth of what has been called “easy listening”. Record producer Jack Hansen used some of the singers to provide backing vocals for Buddy Holly’s last songs, which Holly had composed and recorded shortly before his death in February 1959. The singers’ close harmonies behind Holly’s lead vocals simulated the sound of Holly’s hit records with the Crickets. Six songs resulted from the Hansen sessions, led by the 45-rpm single “Peggy Sue Got Married”/”Crying, Waiting, Hoping”.

On a cruise in 1964, Charles heard a Mexican song called “Cuando Calienta el Sol”. He liked it, recorded it, under the English title “Love Me with All Your Heart”, and his recording became a hit, riding to #3 on Billboard Magazine, #2 on Cashbox Magazine. This was followed by “Al Di La”, also a very popular recording. The Ray Charles Singers were not one group of vocalists. They were different combinations of singers on records, tours and TV shows. What made them the Ray Charles Singers was the conducting and arranging of Ray Charles. He generally recorded with 20 singers (12 men and 8 women) and these vocalists appeared on Perry Como’s television show. The Ray Charles Singers also were the voices behind many commercial jingles.

The Ray Charles Singers01

Charles decided to produce a “live” performing group to send on the road with Perry Como. The group of 12 singers opened in Las Vegas at the International Hotel and also opened the show for Como at Harrah’s in South Lake Tahoe.

Charles wrote the music and lyrics for an album produced by the Continental Insurance Company for the New York World’s Fair in 1964, titled Cinema ’76. It was a companion piece to a 30-minute show about unsung heroes of the American Revolution.

On June 25, 2019, The New York Times Magazine listed the Ray Charles singers among hundreds of artists whose material was reportedly destroyed in the 2008 Universal fire. (by wikipedia)

The Ray Charles Singers02

And here is one of their nice Easy Listening album, it was their 7th album by The Ray Charles Singers and it´s of course a “summer” album … Ih weish all readers of this blog a very good summertime !

And don´t forget:

Although they were led by a man named Ray Charles, this group had no connection whatsoever to Ray Charles the famous soul singer, and certainly no connection whatsoever to soul music. The coincidence of two such different artists sharing the same name led the Ray Charles of the Ray Charles Singers, in fact, to bill himself as “The Other Ray Charles” when he was given a TV credit. (by allmusic)

BackCover

Personnel:
The Ray Charles Singers:
Audrey Marsh – Charles Magruder – Ray Charles – Rose Marie Jun
+
a bunch of unknown studio musicians

The Ray Charles Singers03

 

Tracklist:
01. Summertime (Gershwin/Heyward) 2.54
02. Mountain Greenery (Rodgers/Hart) 2.34
03. Summer Night (Warren/Dubin) 3.03
04. Breezin’ Along With The Breeze (Simons/Whiting/Gillespie) 2.34
05. Lazy Afternoon (Moross/Latouche) 2.56
06. In The Good Old Summertime (Evans/Shields) 2.45
07. Cruisin’ Down The River (Tollerton/Beadell) 3.11
08. Lullaby Of The Leaves (Petkere/Young) 3.02
09. Swingin’ In A Hammock (O`Flynn/Wendling/Seymour) 2.57
10. Picnic (Allen/Dunning) 2.44
11. Me And Marie (Porter) 2.20
12. Lazy River (Carmichael/Arodin) 2.50

LabelB1

*
**

Jimmy Bryant – The Fastest Guitar In The Country (1967)

FrontCover1Ivy J. Bryant, Jr. (March 5, 1925 – September 22, 1980), known as Jimmy Bryant, was an American country music guitarist.

Bryant was born in Moultrie, Georgia, the oldest of 12 children. During the Great Depression he played the fiddle on street corners to help the family buy food, pushed to do so by his father.

After being wounded in World War II, he began working seriously on his guitar playing, influenced heavily by Django Reinhardt. After the war, he returned to Moultrie, then moved to Los Angeles county where he worked in Western films and played music in bars around L.A.’s Skid Row, where he met pioneering pedal steel guitarist Speedy West. West, who joined Cliffie Stone’s popular Hometown Jamboree local radio and TV show, suggested Bryant be hired when the show’s original guitarist departed. That gave Bryant access to Capitol Records since Stone was a Capitol artist and talent scout.

In 1950 Tex Williams heard Bryant’s style and used him on his recording of “Wild Card”. In addition, Bryant and West played on the Tennessee Ernie Ford-Kay Starr hit “I’ll Never Be Free”, leading to both men being signed to Capitol as instrumentalists. Bryant and West became a team, working extensively with each other.

Jimmy Bryant01

Bryant was a difficult musician to work with. By 1955 he left Hometown Jamboree (retaining his friendship with West) and after various clashes with his Capitol producer Ken Nelson, the label dropped him in 1956. In 1957 Jimmy Bryant was a part of one of the first integrated television shows featuring popular radio and television star Jimmie Jackson who hosted the show along with black Jazz violinist and recording star, Stuff Smith and black jazz percussionist and recording star, George Jenkins. He continued working in Los Angeles and in the early 1960s he and his trio made an appearance in the Coleman Francis film The Skydivers.

During the 1960s he shifted into music production. Waylon Jennings made a hit of his song “Only Daddy That’ll Walk the Line”. He can also be heard playing fiddle on the Monkees’ “Sweet Young Thing”.[1] In the early 1970s Bryant ran a recording studio in Las Vegas, but finally relocated to Georgia before settling in Nashville in 1975, the same year he reunited with Speedy West for a reunion album produced by Nashville steel guitarist Pete Drake. Bryant played in Nashville bars and did some recording work but his personality did not mesh well with Nashville’s highly political music and recording industry. In 1978, in declining health, Bryant learned that he had lung cancer; he was a heavy smoker.

He died in Moultrie in September 1980 at the age of 55. (by wikipedia)

Jimmy Bryant03

And here´s a real great album:

Fretboard fanatics…fret no more! Here at last is the album that christened Jimmy Bryant with the distinct moniker of “Fastest Guitar in the Country.” After a run of success with steel guitarist Speedy West on Capitol Records, Jimmy Bryant signed a solo contract with Imperial Records in the mid ’60s. While Bryant’s recordings with West established him as a fretboard genius, it was the 1967 release of The Fastest Guitar in the Country that left the disc jockey world wondering if his lighting speed was legitimate. Naysayers were left in awe as they witnessed Bryant’s dizzying technique at a DJ convention in Nashville. Bryant’s frenzied fretboard flair is in full effect on his rendition of the classic “Sugar Foot Rag” and “Little Rock Getaway” bearing evidence as to why this is one of the most electrifying instrumental recordings of all time. This collection of jazz-fueled country pickin’ is the ultimate testament of Jimmy Bryant’s gift to the guitar world. (Promo text)

I’m a professional musician and music educator of many years. Although it’s not my chosen style of guitar playing, Jimmy’s a heck of a picker! (Zoko)

Believe me: Country music with lots of jazz influences (listen to Duke Ellingtons “Caravan”) … enjoy this very special album !

BackCover1

Personnel:
Jimmy Bryant (guitar, fiddle)
+
a bunch of unknown studio musicians

Jimmy Bryant04

Tracklist:
01. Twelfth Street Rag (Bowman) 1.41
02. Little Rock Getaway (Sullivan/Sigman) 1.52
03. Caravan (Ellington/Tizol) 2.30
04. Down Yonder (Gilbert) 1.42
05. Georgia Boogie (Harris/Turner) 1.51
06. Orange Blossom Special (Rouse) 2,24
07. Tico-Tico (Abreu) 1.59
08. Indiana (Back Home Again In Indiana) (MacDonald/Hanley) 2.04
09. Ten Wheels (Harris/Turner) 1.49
10. Stumbling (Confrey) 1.58
11. Voxwagon (Harris/Turner) 1.52
12. Sugarfoot Rag (Garland/Vaughn) 1.29

LabelB1

*
**

Jimmy Bryant with the voxmobile:
Jimmy Bryant02

LinerNotes2

Françoise Hardy – Clair Obscur (2000)

FrontCover1Françoise Madeleine Hardy (French: [fʁɑ̃swaz aʁdi]; born 17 January 1944) is a French singer-songwriter. She made her musical debut in the early 1960s on Disques Vogue and found immediate success with her song “Tous les garçons et les filles”. As a leading figure of the yé-yé movement, Hardy “found herself at the very forefront of the French music scene”, and became “France’s most exportable female singing star”, recording in various languages, appearing in movies, touring throughout Europe, and gaining plaudits from musicians such as Bob Dylan, Miles Davis and Mick Jagger. With the aid of photographer Jean-Marie Périer, Hardy also began modeling, and soon became a popular fashion icon as well.

As the yé-yé era drew to a close in the late 1960s, Hardy sought to reinvent herself, casting off the fashionable girl next door image that Périer had created for her and abandoning the “cute” and catchy compositions that had characterized her repertoire up to that point. She began working with more accomplished songwriters such as Serge Gainsbourg and Patrick Modiano. Her 1971 album La question represented an important turning point in her career, moving towards a more mature style; it remains her most acclaimed work and has generated a dedicated cult following over the years. The early 1970s also marked the beginning of Hardy’s renowned involvement with astrology, becoming an expert and writer on the subject over the years.

Hardy remains a popular figure in music and fashion, and is considered an icon of French pop and of the 1960s. The singer is also considered a gay icon and has “repeatedly declared that her most devoted friends and fans are gay.” Several of her songs and albums have appeared in critics’ lists.

In May 2000, she made a comeback with the album Clair-obscur on which her son played guitar and her husband sang the duet “Puisque vous partez en voyage”. Iggy Pop and Étienne Daho also took part. (by wikipedia)

And this album is a true treasure … chansons with a fine jazz direction (featuring a rare Eric Clapton composition) … enjoy it !

BackCover1

Personnel:
Pierre-Alain Dahan (drums)
Françoise Hardy (vocals)
Marc Perier (bass)
Jean-Pierre Sabar (piano)
+
Étienne Daho (vocals on 10.)
Jacques Dutronc (vocals on 01.)
Ol (vocals on 03.)
Iggy Pop (vocals on 07.)
+
Jean-Claude Dubois (orchestra director)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Puisque vous partez en voyage (Mireille/Nohain) 3.47
02. Tous mes souvenirs me tuent (Tears) (Grappelli/Reinhardt/Hardy) 3.52
03. Celui que tu veux (Balmayer/Ngog) 3.40
04. Clair-obscur (Chahine/Hardy) 4.18
05. Un Homme est mort (Cano/Hardy) 3.16
06. Duck’s Blues (Lubrano/Hardy) 4.25
07. I’ll Be Seeing You (Fain/Kahal)
08. Tu ressembles à tous ceux qui ont eu du chagrin (Hardy) 2.03
09. La Pleine lune (Lubrano/Hardy) 3.30
10. So Sad (To Watch Good Love Go Bad)” (Don Everly) 3.35
11. La Saison des pluies (Rose/Hardy) 3.57
12. Contre vents et marées (Clapton/Hardy) 3.24
13. La Vérité des choses (Lubrano/Hardy) 4.20

CD1

*
**

Hardy1

Tramline – Moves Of Vegetable Centuries (1969)

CDFrontCover1Michael Joseph Moody (born 30 August 1950) is an English guitarist, and a former member of the rock bands Juicy Lucy and Whitesnake. He was also a founder-member of Snafu. Together with his former Whitesnake colleague Bernie Marsden he founded the Moody Marsden Band, and later, The Snakes, having previously collaborated with unofficial 5th Status Quo member Bob Young in Young & Moody. Along with Marsden and ex-Whitesnake bassist, Neil Murray, he formed The Company of Snakes and M3 Classic Whitesnake with which they mainly performed early Whitesnake songs. From 2011 to 2015, Moody toured and recorded with Snakecharmer, a band he co-formed.

Besides this, Moody has also toured with Roger Chapman, Frankie Miller and Chris Farlowe. He has also performed live alongside the likes of Eric Clapton, Alvin Lee, Mick Taylor, Bruce Dickinson, Sam Brown, Gary Brooker, Suggs, Dennis Locorriere, Paul Jones, P. P. Arnold, James Hunter, Rick Wakeman, Jon Lord, Newton Faulkner, Uriah Heep, Alice Cooper, Mark King, Alfie Boe, Sandi Thom, Brian Auger, Paul Weller, Eric Bibb, Meat Loaf, Boy George, Elkie Brooks, Nona Hendryx, Mud Morganfield and one of his early guitar heroes, Duane Eddy.[citation needed] Since 2000 he has released several solo albums: I Eat Them For Breakfast (2000), Don’t Blame Me (2006), Acoustic Journeyman (2007) and Electric Journeyman (2009). A versatile guitarist, Moody has been an active session musician and his own website lists over 100 albums to which he has contributed musically. 2006 saw the release of the autobiographical Playing With Trumpets – A Rock ‘n’ Roll Apprenticeship, a memoir about his early days on the music scene. Another book of memoirs, Snakes and Ladders, was released in 2016. His library music has been featured on such TV programmes as Waking the Dead, Bo’ Selecta!, America’s Next Top Model, How to Look Good Naked, Top Gear, Horizon, Jersey Shore, Mad Men, Wife Swap and Paul Hollywood’s Bread.

Roadrunners1967

While at school in Middlesbrough and attending private guitar lessons, Moody formed The Roadrunners with others from the area including Paul Rodgers (later of Free and Bad Company). They were subsequently joined by bass player Bruce Thomas, later to play with Elvis Costello and the Attractions. The band performed covers in local halls and clubs. By 1967 they had developed and outgrown the local music scene and turned professional, changing their name to The Wildflowers and subsequently moving to London. They had some success and undertook some touring, but relationships within the band frayed and they eventually split without making any recordings. Moody returned home to Middlesbrough where for a while he widened his musical horizons by taking classical guitar lessons. He also became increasingly interested in slide guitar techniques (a style he would later be closely associated with).

Roadrunners1967_02

While living in Middlesbrough he was asked by local singer and entrepreneur John McCoy, to form a group which became Tramline. A deal for two albums was signed with Island Records, but by the time the second album was released the band had broken up. Moody joined Lucas and the professional Soul band Mike Cotton Sound who became Gene Pitney’s backing band for UK tours as well as others such as Paul Jones (by wikipedia)

The second and final set by the hot young blues band signed to Chris Blackwell’s Island Records back in 1969.

This album was produced by the late Guy Stevens and he suggested the unusual name, for which guitarist Micky Moody confesses he has no explanation. (Stevens had also suggested such names as Procol Harum and Mott The Hoople, and so ‘Moves Of Vegetable Centuries’ was just another flight of Stevens’ fancy!).

Muro do Classic Rock

The band was getting into its stride with the addition of sax player Ron Aspery and bass guitar virtuoso Colin Hodgkinson from progressive group Back Door.

They add a boost to such performances as the Tramline version of Traffic’s ‘Pearly Queen’ and the old Yardbirds’ favourite ‘I Wish You Would’. Here is R’n’B Sixties’ style with high energy and strong musicianship.

Micky Moody describes the evolution and ultimate fate of the band in his interview , making a splendid souvenir of a bye gone musical era. (by Green Brain)

35 minutes in length approximately. The sound is clean yet retains the warmth of the original release. The folded info sheet lists track info and personnel. There’s a synopsis of the group and the era when this album was recorded. The title of the album has mystified listeners since it’s original release-but the person responsible (producer Guy Stevens) has passed on-so we’ll probably never know.

This is the second (and last) album by TRAMLINE.The personnel has changed slightly since the first album. The band on this set is John McCoy-vocals and harmonica (uncredited),Terry Popple-drums,Mick Moody-guitar,and a new bass player,Colin Hodgkinson. On tracks 3,4,5,and 6 there are two sax players,who help fill in the sound. Someone named “Norman” plays piano occasionally,but his last name remains a mystery.

This album contains the song “Pearly Queen”,about as close to a hit as the group had. It rightfully received airplay,due in large part to Moody’s guitar playing. The track has a lot of energy,and its easy to see why it was popular during that time. If guitar playing is important to you,the track titled “Grunt” (actually “You Need Love”),is another fine number,with the piano and saxes lending good support to Moody’s guitar. Like the first album,there are some well known blues songs-“I Wish You Would” by Billy Boy Arnold,which is played and sung as a straight shuffle-style blues,and “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl” by Sonny Boy Williamson,which has McCoy’s imitation of Williamson’s vocal style. The track “Sweet Mary” (recorded by CYRIL DAVIES & THE ALL STARS) is a low down dirty blues,played with great feeling by one of the sax players,and also has some lovely piano fills,with Moody’s guitar playing some straight blues licks,along with a bit of slide guitar.

Micky Moody01

An interesting song is “You Better Run”, by two members of THE (YOUNG) RASCALS. The final tune,”Harriet’s Underground Railway”,an original refers to an underground railway for slaves during the Civil War. As is often the case,the music was laid down first,with the vocals put on later-after McCoy thought up some lyrics,which have nothing to do with the title.

Like the first album,this set is for people who like (relatively unknown) English blues bands from the late 60’s/early 70’s. This album is a bit more “together” than the first,but both sets have something to offer the listener (like me) who likes this era and style of music. Like the first album,this too has the feeling of it’s time and place. As I said about the first album,if you can remember record stores,this album gives the feeling of having been bought at your favorite store of the time,and then brought home and slipped onto the turntable. That’s not a bad thing because it shows this under-appreciated group made some good music,and was very much of it’s time and place-and if you like that era-you might like this band (by Stuart Jefferson)

And yes … Mick< Moody is one of my favourite guitr player and of course is Colin Hodgkinson one of the finest bass player ever.

BackCover

Personnel:
Colin Hodgkinson (bass)
John McCoy (vocals)
Mick Moody (guitar)
Terry Popple (drums)
+
Ron Aspery (saxophone)
Iss Mate (saxophone)

Booklet_2ATracklist:
01. Pearly Queen (Capaldi/Winwood) 3.39
02. Sweet Satisfaction (McCoy/Moody) 3.32
03. You Better Run (Brigati/Cavaliere) 2.17
04. Grunt (Moody) 7.11
05. Sweet Mary (Traditional) 6.24
06. I Wish You Would (Arnold) 5.20
07. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl (Williamson) 2.30
08. Harriet’s Underground Railway (McCoy/Moody) 3.55

LabelB1

*
**

Jack Green – Humanesque (1980)

FrontCover1Jack Green (born 12 March 1951 in Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish musician and songwriter.

Green played with T. Rex between 1973 and 1974, then with Pretty Things between 1974 and 1976, recording Silk Torpedo and Savage Eye. After Phil May walked out on the Pretty Things he carried on with Peter Tolson, Gordon Edwards and Skip Alan in Metropolis. He also was a member of Rainbow for three weeks in late 1978.

He launched a solo career with the album Humanesque in 1980, followed by Reverse Logic in 1981, Mystique in 1983 and Latest Game in 1986.

He joined with former T-Rex members Mickey Finn and Paul Fenton in Mickey_Finn’s_T-Rex (1997-1999).

Green is now living in Ryde, Isle of Wight, where he teaches guitar, and owns a budget film production company.

A new album The Party At The End Of The World is scheduled for release on 3rd February 2020. (by wikipedia)

JackGreen1974_01

Known to UK rock and pop fans through his involvement with the Pretty Things, Green relocated to Canada to build his solo career. Though now regularly consigned to the ‘where are they now?’ columns in the country of his birth, a sequence of albums for RCA Records in Canada have produced a cult following in that territory. Humanesque, which featured Ritchie Blackmore of Rainbow on one track, and Essential Logic are two collections that married melodious pop hooks with Green’s own rock guitar licks. Latest Game saw him move to FM/Revolver, but distribution of the record in the UK failed to excite much critical interest despite Green’s reputation and stature in Canada. (by allmusic.com)

And Humanesque is Jack Green’s debut album. The track “I Call, No Answer” features Ritchie Blackmore of Deep Purple as a guest artist on lead guitar. (by wikipedia)

JackGreen1978_01

I’ve never heard of Jack Green before, but the albums looked like fun, and the date is 80, so these are most definitely going to be guitar driven singer/songwriter tunes, but how good will they be? I don’t know if they will lean toward new wave or Americana folk guitar. But I’m game to hope for the first. Just from the design from Humanesque, it looks angular and fun. I like his style on the back too.

“Murder” starts as a bass-heavy70’s rock song, like foreigner or something a bit smoky with a touch of danger. It is a good album starter, because the whole song feels like it is building to something, but it never quite gets there. So, in effect, it’s building up the rest of the album.
“So Much” is introduced with a new wave sounding organ and drums. The vocals make PromoPosterthe song feel like a Tom Petty track. But in the chorus, the vocals take on more of an Elvis Costello or Graham Parker feel. And the energetic vocal outburst of ‘alright’ reminds me of Mike Viola, but the comparison really ends there.
“Valentina” is a slower, smooth guitar ballad. The style of the slide guitar in short bursts; a technique not used as much anymore, dates the song, and gives it a bit of a confident and dangerous mood.
“Babe” simplistically bounces and rocks out from the get go with its use of complex but light guitar hook and simple drum beat. It is an immediately fun, catchy song, and then first small taste you get of the chorus solidifies the song as a rollicking pop song, very similar to Elvis Costello’s style. It is repetitive, but a fun melody is still a fun melody. The verse is just a build up to get to the exceptional chorus, which then becomes all you want to hear in a loop.
“Can’t Stand It” has an angry Bryan Adams-like presentation in the chorus. Again, the drums and instrumental usage is sparse, but efficient. The songs feel like they have a lot of empty space, which is actually a positive nod to the production, as the songs still feel complete.

“I Call, No Answer” continues with the smoky, mysterious and confident guitar play, and the vocals are no different in their urgency or Bryan Adams, “Run To You” tone.
“Life on the Line” slows the record down a bit with its reggae rhythm. It still has a solid JackGreen02electric guitar presence in the verse, but the tempo is relaxed, despite the high anxiety title. “’Bout the Girl” takes the stripped down guitar rock song to the extreme. It has a catchy upward tempo for the verse, and the chorus takes the opportunity to rock out a bit more, Big Star harmonic style.“Though It Was Easy” is a slower reflective song. It still feeds a bit of a punch with the parallel and layered bass and guitar, but the vocals give it that reminiscent feel. “Factory Girl” has a start stop guitar that makes me think of “867-5309/Jenny.” But there is not that much energy in the song. In fact, the tempo is much slower and the song struts along at its own, hurry-free pace.
“This Is Japan” ends the album as sparse and relaxed as the opening track offered an insurmountable build. After the title is spoke/sung, a tacky oriental keyboard plays in repeat a couple of times, and here and there throughout the slow struggling song. The song does finish off the album nicely though. (thriftstoremusic.blogspot.com)

In other words: Pretty good Power-Pop-Rock from this period.

And in 2020 he released another solo-album called “The Party At The End Of The World”.

BackCover

Personnel:
Brian Chatton (keyboards)
Mel Collins (saxophone)
Andy Dalby (guitar)
Ian Ellis (bass)
Jack Green (guitar, vocals, bass)
Mac Poole (drums)
Pete Tolson (guitar)
+
Ritchie Blackmore (guitar on 06.)

Inlets
Tracklist:
01. Murder (Green/Adey) 3.19
02. So Much (Green/Adey) 4.50
03. Valentina (Green/Adey) 4.22
04. Babe (Green) 3.30
05. Can’t Stand It (Green/Adey) 3.36
06. I Call, No Answer (Green) 3.27
07. Life On The Line (Green/Adey) 4.03
08. ‘Bout That Girl (Green) 2.59
09. Thought It Was Easy (Jack Green/Jackie Green) 2.45
10. Factory Girl (Green/Adey) 2.54
11. This Is Japan (Green/Adey) 3.13

LabelB1

*
**

JackGreen2010_01

Jack Green in 2020

 

Big Brother and The Holding Company- The Lost Tapes (2008)

FrontCover1The Lost Tapes is a two disc compilation album by the San Francisco psychedelic-acid rock band, Big Brother and the Holding Company with Janis Joplin as their lead singer. The material featured here contains twelve previously unreleased Big Brother tracks from 1966 when Joplin first joined Big Brother up until before she left.

The second disc was originally released as a live album in 1966 entitled Live In San Francisco. (by wikipedia)

The Lost Tapes combines previously unreleased material with performances that have been floating around on bootlegs for years. Listening to these early live recordings from late 1966 and early 1967, it’s hard to imagine that this is the same band that would level the audience at the Monterey Pop Festival — alongside Jimi Hendrix and Otis Redding — and propel Janis Joplin into superstardom.

Booklet02

The 26 songs are a loose mix of originals from their self-titled Mainstream album, along with cover versions of “Amazing Grace,” “Hi Heel Sneakers,” “Let the Good Times Roll,” “I Know You Rider,” and “Moanin’ at Midnight.” By far, the oddest cover is “Faster Pussycat, Kill! Kill!,” which musically has absolutely nothing in common with the version performed in the Russ Meyer film by the Bostweeds. The rambling spoken intro is longer than the actual song itself! Very weird! This material is unquestionably sloppy and miles away from the slick soul-rock Joplin would perform with Full Tilt Boogie and the Kozmic Blues Band after leaving Big Brother in late 1968.

BigBrother

It’s also what makes this relic so charming; hearing a young Janis Joplin not burdened with being the star, but just another member of the band, relaxed and playful. Airline’s 2008 version of The Lost Tapes was licensed from Big Brother & the Holding Company, with 24-bit remastering and notes by drummer David Getz and guitarist Sam Andrew. (by Al Campbell)

BackCover

Personnel:
Peter Albin (bass, vocals)
Sam Andrew (guitar)
David Getz (drums)
James Gurley (guitar)
Janis Joplin (vocals)

Booklet01+04
Tracklist:

Recorded Live At The Matrix, San Francisco, 1967:
01. Bye, Bye Baby (St. John) 4.11
02. Great White Guru (unknown) 5.47
03. Women Is Losers (Joplin) 5.09
04. Oh My Soul (Penniman) 2.35
05. Amazing Grace (Traditional) 11.31
06. Caterpillar (Albin) 4.11
07- It’s A Deal (Andrew/Albin) 2.14
08. Hi Heel Sneakers (Higginbottam) 3.37
09. Faster Pussycat Kill Kill (unknown) 2.23
10. Turtle Blues (Joplin) 6.47
11. All Is Loneliness (Moondog) 9.05
12. Light Is Faster Than Sound (Albin) 6.27

Recorded Live At California Hall, San Francisco, 1966:
01. (Come On Baby) Let the Good Times Roll) (Goodman/Lee) 2.38
02. I Know You Rider (Traditional) 3.14
03. Moanin’ At Midnight (Burnett) 4.58
04. Hey Baby (Albin/Andrew/Getz/Gurley/Joplin) 2.51
05. Down On Me (Traditional) 2.46
06. Whisperman (Albin/Andrew/Getz/Gurley/Joplin) 1.46
07. Women Is Losers (Joplin) 3.48
08. Blow My Mind (McCracklin) 2.35
09. Oh My Soul (Penniman) 2.34
10. Ball And Chain (Thornton) 6.43
11. Coo-Coo (Traditional) 2.30
12. Gutra’s Garden Albin/Andrew/Getz/Gurley/Joplin) 4.37
13. Harry (Getz) 0.38
14. Hall Of The Mountain King (Grieg) 6.51

CD2

 

*
**

BigBrother2