Julie Felix – Hota Chocolata (1978)

frontcover1Julie Ann Felix (born 14 June 1938, Santa Barbara, California) is an American born, British-based folk recording artist who achieved success in the late 1960s and early 1970s. She continues to perform and releases albums on her own record label.

She graduated in 1956 from high school in Westchester, Los Angeles, California. The same year that she arrived in the United Kingdom, she became the first solo folk performer signed to a major British record label, when she gained a recording contract with Decca Records. Within a decade she had a well-established career. In 1965 she was reportedly the first folksinger to fill the Royal Albert Hall, and was described by The Times as “Britain’s First Lady of Folk”.

In 1966 Felix became the resident singer on the BBC television programme The Frost Report, presented by David Frost. She hosted her own shows for the BBC from 1968 to 1970, including the series Once More With Felix (the first episode was transmitted on 9 December 1967). Among those featured on her show were The Kinks, Leonard Cohen and Led Zeppelin’s lead guitarist, Jimmy Page, who played the “White Summer” and “Black Mountain Side” guitar solo pieces. On 1 May 1967 she appeared on the German TV show Beat-Club; in September 1968 at the International Essen Song Days. She performed at the Isle of Wight Festival in 1969.
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She had two UK Singles Chart hits in 1970. The first was with the song entitled “If I Could (El Cóndor Pasa)”, while the second, marginally less successful, was called “Heaven is Here”. 1990 saw the release of a new album, Bright Shadows.
On 24 March 2008 she appeared on a BBC Four programme in which stars of The Frost Report gathered for a night celebrating 40 years since Frost Over England; Felix sang “Blowin’ in the Wind”. She has appeared at the Wynd Theatre, Melrose, Scottish Borders, on an annual basis over the past few years.

She now lives in Chorleywood, Hertfordshire, England, and is still recording and performing, appearing on stage on her 70th birthday in 2008 (by Wikipedia)
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Alternate front + back cover
“I feel we need to welcome the divine feminine into our lives and into our hearts … Patriarchy has led to wars, killing, and the rape of mother earth. Both men and women need to feel the love of the feminine side of God.” (Julie Felix)
Listen to another beautiful album by Julie Felix … wonderful songs, fantastic lyrics … what a great artist !
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Single from Norway
Personnel:
Julie Felix (guitar, vocals, Percussion)
Steve Hayton (guitar, Percussion, background vocals)
Danny Thompson (bass, percussion)
+
Ted Lazer (accordion on 06.)
Kesh Sathie (tabla, tambura on 12.)
Billy Stevens (harmonica on 03. + 09.)
+
Background vocals:
Mick + Donna (on 01.)
Tanit + Samantha (on 06.)
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Tracklist:
01. Hota Chocolata (Felix) 3.31
02. Let Me Love You (Felix) 2.57
03. Deportees (Guthrie) 4.47
04. Solado De Levita (Traditional) 2.32
05. Da Me La Fuerza (Felix) 3.14
06. In Paris (Felix) 3.15
07. Hey Liley-Liley Lo (Austin/Lomax) 0.54
08. Windy Morning (Felix) 2:46
09. David (Felix) 2.37
10. Sydney Harbour (Felix) 4.51
11. Clotho’s Web (Felix) 3.38
12. Face Of The Moon (Felix) 3.12
15. Moon Light (Felix) 2.38
16. Pow Wow! (Felix) 2.23

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gigguide2017
Still alive and well …

Scorpions – Crazy World (1990)

frontcover1Crazy World is the eleventh studio album by German hard rock band Scorpions, released on November 6, 1990.[5] The album peaked at No. 21 on the Billboard 200 chart for albums in 1991. That same year, the song “Wind of Change” reached No. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100[6] and “Send Me an Angel” reached No. 44 on the same chart.[6] Crazy World was the last album to feature bassist Francis Buchholz, and by that extent, the last to feature the band’s classic lineup. It also has the only Scorpions track to credit Buchholz, “Kicks After Six”. This album was the band’s first album in a decade and a half to not be produced by Dieter Dierks and is widely considered to be the last “classic” Scorpions album. In the UK, it remains the only Scorpions album to attain Silver certification (60,000 units sold) by the British Phonographic Industry, achieving this in November 1991.
“Hit Between the Eyes” was played during the ending credits of the 1992 film Freejack. “Send Me an Angel” was played at the closing scene in an episode of the show Cold Case. “Wind of Change” was also used during the 2009 film Gentlemen Broncos and towards the end of the 2014 film The Interview. (by wikipedia)

After the release of Savage Amusement in 1988, the Scorpions expressed disdain toward the album, feeling that it was too polished when compared to their other work. Their longtime producer, Dieter Dierks, was replaced with well-known rock producer Keith Olsen, who would produce Crazy World and assist in making it one of the Scorpions’ greatest recordings. Their music had certainly changed since Savage Amusement, sounding a little bit heavier and less glamorous. But even with the metal sound, the songs remain melodic and catchy. The power ballads on the album, “Wind of Change” and “Send Me an Angel,” are arguably two of the band’s greatest slow numbers, boasting soothing harmony and lyrics. Crazy World remains the Scorpions’ finest ’90s album and is sure to please its listeners. (by Barry Weber)
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Personnel:
Francis Buchholz (bass, background vocals)
Matthias Jabs (guitar, background vocals)
Klaus Meine (vocals)
Herman Rarebell (drums, background vocals)
Rudolf Schenker (guitar, background vocals)
+
Koen van Baal (keyboards on (04.)
Robbie Buchanan (keyboards on 04.)
Jim Vallance (keyboards on 11.)
Michael Thompson (guitar on 04.)
+
background vocals:
Claudia Frohling – Tony Ioannoua – Cliff Roles – Jim Lewis – Dries van der Schuyt
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Tracklist:
01. Tease Me Please Me (Meine/Rarebell/Vallance/Jabs) 4.44
02. Don’t Believe Her (Rarebell/Meine/Vallance/R.Schenker) 4.55
03. To Be With You In Heaven (Meine/Schenker  4:48
04. Wind Of Change (Meine) 5.10
05. Restless Nights (Meine/Rarebell/Vallance/R.Schenker) 5:44
06. Lust Or Love (Meine/Rarebell/Vallance) 4.22
07. Kicks After Six (Rarebell/Meine/Vallance/Buchholz)  3.49
08. Hit Between The Eyes”  Rarebell, Meine, Vallance  Schenker  4:33
09. Money And Fame  (Jabs/Rarebell) 5.06
10. Crazy World (Meine/R.Schenker/Rarebell/Vallance) 5.08
11. Send Me An Angel (Meine/Schenker) 4.32
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Vanessa Mae – The Violin Player (1995)

frontcover1The Violin Player is the first techno/pop album by classical and pop musician Vanessa-Mae, released in 1995. It is the first album Vanessa-Mae released on the EMI label. The album was produced by Mike Batt, and recorded and mixed by Gareth Cousins, who also programmed the synthesisers and beats for the album.

The Violin Player features a varied blend of music – covers of some classical (J.S. Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D minor), remakes of old favourites (including American composer Mason Williams’ “Classical Gas”) and originals (seven tracks composed by British musician and songwriter Mike Batt), and one original by Vanessa-Mae herself, co-written with Ian Wherry (“Red Hot”).
Singles released from the album include “Toccata and Fugue”, which reached number 16 in the UK Singles Chart and “Red Hot” which reached number 37.
The Violin Player reached #11 in the UK Albums Chart in February 1995, and was certified Gold by the BPI in June 1995. It has sold over 8 million copies worldwide, and is still regarded by many as Vanessa-Mae’s best work. (by Wikipedia)

Vanessa-Mae was just a teenager when her major-label debut, The Violin Player, was released. This may account for her ability to successfully fuse old-world classical styles with a contemporary new age sensibility. She comes out scorching on the Bach classic “Toccata and Fugue in D Minor,” showing off her world-class talent as a revolutionary violinist. The new arrangements by producer Mike Batt add a flavorful world music appeal that both compliments and showcases her masterful skill. While all ten tracks are performed as instrumentals, Vanessa-Mae manages to squeeze every ounce of passion out of a note, transcending the necessity for lyrics. Her ability to play off of other instruments is brought to the forefront on the final track “Red Hot.” She goes toe to toe with a forceful electric guitar and her four-string violin leaves the challenging six-string in the dust. This record will delight those who are bold enough to challenge themselves by listening to a collection of songs that defy standard genre classifications. (by Erik Crawford)

And you´ll hear one of my favourite guitar players: Dave “Clem” Clempson !
EMMA Awards Vanessa Mae
Personnel:
Mike Batt (Keyboards)
Martin Bliss (guitar)
Dave “Clem” Clempson (guitar)
Dick Morgan (oboe)
Richard Morgan (oboe)
Maurice Murphy (rumpet)
Philip Todd (saxophone)
Unspecified Enemies  Composer
Vanessa-Mae (violin)
Vasko Vassilev (viola, violin)
Ian Wherry (Keyboards)
+
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
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Tracklist:
01. Toccata and Fugue in D Minor (Bach) 7.47
02. Contradanza (Batt) 3.49
03. Classical Gas (Williams) 3.21
04. Theme from ‘Caravans’ (Batt) 5.06
05. Warm Air (Batt) 3.38
06. Jazz Will Eat Itself (Batt) 3.30
07. Widescreen (Batt) 3.58
08. Tequila Mockingbird (Batt) 3.26
09. City Theme (Batt) 4.32
10. Red Hot (Wherry/Mae) 3.16
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cdsingles
The CD singles

Aretha Franklin – Through The Storm (1988)

frontcover1Through the Storm is the thirty-fifth studio album by American singer Aretha Franklin, released on Arista Records in the spring of 1989.
Despite the number 16 Billboard Hot 100 hit title track (a duet with Elton John), the album was not a commercial success; it reached number 55 on the Billboard 200. Selling approximately 225,000 copies in the United States, it was taken swiftly out of print shortly. The follow-up single, “It Isn’t, It Wasn’t, It Ain’t Never Gonna Be”, a duet with Whitney Houston, failed to make the top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at number 41. Other guest artists included James Brown, The Four Tops and Kenny G. (by Wikipedia)
Having scored in the recent past with producer Narada Michael Walden and some star duets, Franklin and Arista turned out another album with the same approach but less successful results. The title duet with Elton John went Top 20, but its followup, “It Isn’t, It Wasn’t, It Ain’t Never Gonna Be” was an embarrassing failure for both Franklin and the previously pop-perfect Whitney Houston. The rest was even less distinguished, including a song with The Four Tops and Kenny G and a remake of the old hit “Think.” (by William Ruhlmann)
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Personnel:
Walter Afanasieff (bass, drum programming, keyboards, Synthesizer)
Renaldo Benson (vocals)
Chris Botti (trumpet)
Michael Davis (trombone)
George Devens (percussion)
Abdul Fakir (vocals)
David Foster (keyboards, Synthesizer)
Aretha Franklin (vocals, piano)
Greg “Gigi” (ercussion)
Reggie Griffin (guitar)
Kenneth Hitchcock (saxophone)
Yogi Horton (drums)
Louis Johnson (bass)
Steve Khan (guitar)
Ren Klyce (keyboards)
Jerry Knight (bass)
Robbie Kondor (bass, piano, Synthesizer)
Steve Kroon (percussion)
Arif Mardin (strings, synthesizer)
Sammy Merendino (drums)
David Paich (Keyboards)
Lawrence Payton (vocals)
Jeff Porcaro (drums)
Doc Powell (bass, guitar)
John “J.R.” Robinson (drums)
Marc Russo (Saxophone)
Corrado Rustici (guitar)
Bob Smith (drums)
Kent Smith (trumpet)
Andy Snitzer (Saxophone)
Levi Stubbs (vocals)
Narada Michael Walden (drums, keyboards, percussion, Synthesizer)
Aaron Zigman (keyboards, vocals)
+
James Brown (vocals on 01.)
The Four Tops   (vocals on 08.)
Kenny G (Saxophone on 08.)
Whitney Houston (vocals on 04.)
Elton John (vocals on 05.)
+
background vocals:
Kitty Beethoven – Margaret Branch – Brenda Corbett – Siedah Garrett – Liz Jackson – Skyler Jett – Melisa Kary – Edie Lehmann – Myrna Mathews – Marti McCall – Claytoven Richardson
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Tracklist:
01. Gimme Your Love (duet With James Brown) (Walden/Cohen) 5.19
02. Mercy (Garrett/Ballard) 4.09
03. He’s The Boy (Franklin) 4.06
04. It Isn’t, It Wasn’t, It Ain’t Never Gonna Be (duet With Whitney Houston) (Hammond/Warren) 5.39
05. Through The Storm (duet With Elton John) (Hammond/Warren) 4.23
06. Think (1989) (Franklin/White) 3.39
07. Come To Me (Price) 3.43
08. If Ever A Love There Was (with the Four Tops and Kenny G) (Oland/Cerney) 4.47
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Aretha Franklin with James Brown

The Herd – Lookin’ Through You (1968)

frontcover1The Herd were an British pop rock group, founded in 1965, that came to prominence in the late 1960s. They launched the career of Peter Frampton and scored three UK top twenty hits.

The Herd were founded in 1965 in south London, England. The group recorded three unsuccessful singles with the record label Parlophone. In 1966 three members in succession (Terry Clark, Louis Cennamo and Mick Underwood) quit the Group and the group got the line-up that made it famous. The singer, Peter Frampton, was 16 when he joined the group in 1966 and had just left school. The other members were a few years older. Parlophone did not want to go on with them, but Fontana was willing to give them a try.[2] They also sent their manager Billy Gaff away and brought in the songwriters/producers Ken Howard and Alan Blaikley instead. This pair had been largely responsible for a string of hits by Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich.
Howard and Blaikley orchestrated for them a unique blend of pop and flower power. After a UK Singles Chart near-miss with “I Can Fly” (1967), the haunting “From the Underworld”, based on the legend of Orpheus and Eurydice, reached Number 6 later that year with help from copious plays on pirate radio. It was a hit in other countries too. In the Netherlands the song reached Number 3. “From the Underworld” was followed by “Paradise Lost”, which made it up to Number 15 in 1968.
Their greatest success came with “I Don’t Want Our Loving to Die”, a Number 5 UK hit single (also in 1968).
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The Herd appeared at The Saville Theatre, London on Sunday 8 October 1967 supporting The Jimi Hendrix Experience. Also on the bill were The Crazy World of Arthur Brown and Eire Apparent.
With his boyish photogenic looks, Frampton was dubbed “The Face of ’68” by teen magazine Rave.
The last months of 1968 were tempestuous times for the group. Steele left the group, to be replaced by Henry Spinetti. The group dumped their managers Howard and Blaikley, and briefly found a new mentor in Harvey Lisberg who after three months found himself so bogged down with their personnel problems that he politely withdrew his services. Most songs on their first and only album Paradise Lost were written by Peter Frampton and Andy Bown, just like their next single, “Sunshine Cottage”.
theherd02
Dissatisfied with mere teen idol status, and disappointed with the failure of “Sunshine Cottage”, Frampton left by the end of 1968 to form Humble Pie with Steve Marriott.[2] The remaining members Bown, Spinetti and Taylor made another flop single, “The Game”,[5] then minus Taylor, formed the short-lived Judas Jump with Allan Jones, saxophonist from Amen Corner, and Welsh vocalist Adrian Williams. Taylor, who became a disc jockey, and Steele, reunited briefly for a one-off single “You’ve Got Me Hangin’ From Your Lovin’ Tree” in June 1971, to almost universal lack of interest.

By the late 1970s, after a stint back with a pre-“Frampton Comes Alive!” Peter Frampton band from 1973-1975, Bown had become a member of UK rockers Status Quo and both Taylor and Spinetti had joined up with Gerry Rafferty’s band. (by wikipedia)
And this is their debut Album … a superb mix of  Pop and psychedelic music … (listen to “From The Underworld” and “Paradise Lost” !)
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Personnel:
Andy Bown (keyboards, vocals, bass)
Peter Frampton (guitar, vocals)
Andrew Steele (drums)
Gary Taylor (bass, vocals, guitar)
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Tracklist:
01. I Don’t Want Our Loving To Die (Blaikley) 2.59
02. Come On – Believe Me (Taylor) 2.51
03. Our Fairy Tale (Bown/Frampton) 2.40
04. On My Way Home (Bown/Frampton) 2.03
05. Goodbye Groovy (Blaikley) 2.46
06. From The Underworld (Blaikley) 3.16
07. Paradise Lost (Blaikley) 3.33
08. Sweet William (Bown/Frampton)  2.19
09. I Can Fly (Blaikley) 3.13
10. Understand Me (Warland/Bown) 2.30

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Personnel note:
During the Seventies I played the bass in a prog band called “Cold Fever” (organ – bass -drums) and we did a few gigs and someday we went in a Studio and did a prog version of “From The Underworld” – we mixed it with “Paradise Lost” …(still unreleased *smile*)

“Cold Fever” was led by my brother, who died in 2013 …

I would like to dedicate his entry to him !

 

Out of the land of shadows and
darkness, we were returning
Towards the morning light
Almost in reach of places I knew
Escaping the ghosts of Yesterday
You were behind me following
closely
“Don’t turn around now”
I heard you whisper in my ear
“If you should turn now,
All that you won
Will vanish just like a passing dream.
Just on the very verge of the
morning, daylight was dawning,
freedom was but a step away
Now with the deep dark river
behind us,
what could go wrong if I stayed
strong in mind.
What was the sudden lapse into
madness, what was the urge that
turned my head around to look at you?
What was the stubborn will
to destroy the love and the joy
I nearly held?
three times the thunder roared
in my ears
In all of my years I’ll see that lost
look in your eyes.
As, with a sigh like smoke in the wind
You slipped from my grasp into
the waiting shadows
so much I longed to say,
but my touch found only the
empty air and a black nights
coldness.
lnto another world you entered
And never again I can reclaim you.

Passport – Heavy Nights (1986)

frontcover1Heavy Nights finds Passport founder and veteran sax man Klaus Doldinger in rare form. On this offering from 1986, the veteran sax player delves into the world of pop-jazz. Although, given his vast palette and the different settings here, it would be a mistake to simply call Heavy Nights a pop-jazz record. Doldinger’s tastes have always been eclectic and he brings his own unique jazz contributions to the table. Furthermore, he possesses that rare ability to produce jazz that is accessible without having to sacrifice substance in the process. Whatever you chose to call it, Heavy Nights is just great music. The songs here range from the playful “Bahia Praia” to the upbeat, big-band feel of “It’s Magic.” On board for this incarnation of Passport are Kevin Mulligan (guitar), Dieter Petereit (bass), Curt Cress (drums), Herman Weindorf (keyboards), and Victoria Miles (vocals). The performances of this lineup are certainly noteworthy throughout, but Heavy Nights is really a one-man show. Doldinger takes charge here performing, producing, arranging, and, composing all of the tracks. As expected, he excels in all of these areas, but it’s his ability to speak in cohesive melodic sentences that are both lyrically and emotionally satisfying, and which makes this disc so enjoyable. The melodies aren’t just good, they’re memorable. The beautiful “Forever,” as romantic a piece as you will find, is not just memorable, it actually borders on unforgettable. In addition, Doldinger’s distinct phrasing punctuates each of the tracks adding the dramatic pauses that help to distinguish Heavy Nights.
The arrangements, for the most part, are straightforward with a few twists thrown in. Doldinger makes wonderful use of the sparseness constructing interesting passages that enhance the mood of each piece. On almost all of the tracks, Doldinger handles the lion’s share of the soloing chores. Not surprisingly, his focus and restraint speak volumes. When he steps forward he delivers, and when appropriate he steps back, allowing his bandmembers and session people to add the right touches. Benny Bailey’s flügelhorn solo on the title track, for instance, is the perfect contrast to Doldinger’s tenor sax, and is one of the records highlights. Some of the other stand-out tracks include the atmospheric “Here Today,” and the jazzy “Easy Come, Easy Go.” As he has been known to do, Doldinger continually experimented and found new directions for Passport. The rock guitar-based Running in Real Time and the spacy Earthborn, also from this era, are both noteworthy. Heavy Nights, though, is arguably the high-water mark for Doldinger thus far. (by Jeri Montesano)
doldinger
Personnel:
Curt Cress (drums)
Biboul Darouiche (percussion)
Klaus Doldinger (saxophone, keyboards on 04., lyricon on 07.)
Dieter Petereit (bass)
Kevin Mulligan (guitar)
Hermann Weindorf (keyboards)
+
Benny Baily (flugelhorn on 05. + 06.)
Andreas Haderer (trumpet on 08.)
Nadeen Holloway (background vocals on 08.)
Franz Weyerer (vocals on 08.)
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Tracklist:

01. Bahia Praia  5.13
02. Playing Games 4.13
03. Here Today 5.57
04. Forever 4.50
05. Heavy Nights 6.03
06. Easy Come, Easy Go 4.24
07. Remembrance 5.36
08. It’s Magic 4.14
Music: Klaus Doldinger
Lyrics: Victoria Miles (08.)
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Larry Coryell Group – Boston 1972

frontcover1Legendary guitarist Larry Coryell died on February 19, 2017 at the age of 73 in his New York City hotel room, according to a statement sent to Billboard from jazz publicist Jim Eigo. Coryell, who passed away in his sleep from natural causes, had performed his last two shows this past weekend at the city’s Iridium Jazz Club. Known as the “Godfather of Fusion,” Coryell was a pioneer of jazz-rock. He made his mark in the music world with his highly acclaimed solo work, releasing more than 60 solo albums in his lifetime. His most notable album, Spaces, came in late 1969. The guitar blow-out, also featuring John McLaughlin, is considered the beginning of the 1970s’ fusion jazz movement. Coryell performed with mid-’70s powerhouse fusion band The Eleventh House and collaborated with jazz greats including Miles Davis, Gary Burton, Alphonse Mouzon, Ron Carter and Chet Baker. Though his commercial fame didn’t match some of his ’60s-’70s guitar contemporaries, Coryell continued to tour the world and had planned an extensive 2017 summer tour with a reformed The Eleventh House. (Billboard)

Thanks to goody for sharing the show at Dime.
Another tribute in honor of the already missed master Larry Coryell, here’s an early one I fixed up, originally posted by our friend, mr mags, who got it from agalli.
Thanks to ethiessen1 for the artwork.

What a brilliant concert to promote his solo-album “Offering”
larrycoryell2
Personnel:
Larry Coryell (guitar)
Mike Mandel (Keyboards)
Steve Marcus (Saxophone)
John Miller (bass)
Harry Wilkinson (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Untitled (unknown) 13.26
02. Ruminations (Davis) 9.13
03. Hen-Hopper (Mandel) 7.06
04. Scotland, Part 1 (Coryrell) 7.06
05. Offering (Wilkinson) 6.10
06. DJ Announcements 1.09

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larrycoryell

Larry Coryell
(* 2. April 1943 in Galveston, Texas; † 19. Februar 2017 in New York City, New York)

RIP and thanks for the music !