The Sweet – The Outtakes (1994)

FrontCover1The Sweet (also referred to as Sweet, and originally called Sweetshop) are a British glam rock band that rose to worldwide fame in the 1970s with their most prolific line-up: lead vocalist Brian Connolly, bass player Steve Priest, guitarist Andy Scott, and drummer Mick Tucker.

The band was formed in London in 1968 and achieved their first hit, “Funny Funny”, in 1971 after teaming up with songwriters Nicky Chinn and Mike Chapman and record producer Phil Wainman. During 1971 and 1972, their musical style followed a marked progression from the Archies-like bubblegum style of “Funny Funny” to a Who-influenced hard rock style supplemented by a striking use of high-pitched backing vocals.
The band achieved notable success in the UK charts, with thirteen Top 20 hits during the 1970s alone, with “Block Buster!” (1973) topping the chart, followed by three consecutive number two hits in “Hell Raiser” (1973), “The Ballroom Blitz” (1973) and “Teenage Rampage” (1974). The band turned to a more hard rock style with their mid-career singles, like 1974’s “Turn It Down”. “Fox on the Run” (1975) also reached number two on the UK charts. These results were topped in West Germany and other countries on the European mainland. They also achieved success and popularity in the US with the top ten hits “Little Willy”, “The Ballroom Blitz” and “Fox on the Run”.

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The Sweet had their last Top 10 hit in 1978 with “Love Is Like Oxygen”. Connolly left the group in 1979 to start a solo career and the remaining members continued as a trio until disbanding in 1981. From the mid-1980s, Scott, Connolly and Priest each played with their own versions of Sweet at different times. Connolly died in 1997 and Tucker in 2002. The two surviving members are still active in their respective versions of the band; Scott’s is based in England and Priest’s in Los Angeles. (by Wikipedia)
And here´s a rare bootleg from their most sucesssful years …

If you are a Sweet fan, there’s really nothing more to say except “Too bad” if you’re into the bubblegum phase of the group [Co-Co, Funny Funny, Poppa Joe] – these are from the glam/rock side of Sweet.

Excellent audio recordings !

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Personnel:
Brian Connolly (vocals)
Steve Priest (bass, background vocals)
Andy Scott (guitar, Keyboards, Background vocals)
Mick Tucker (drums, Percussion, Background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Teenage Rampage (previously unreleased outtake from 1973) (Chinn/Chapman) 3.19
02. She Gimme Lovin’ (outtake version) (Connolly/Priest/Scott/Tucker) 4.04
03. Hell Raiser (previously unreleased outtake from 1972) (Chinn/Chapman) 3.10
04. Hard Times (outtake version) (Connolly/Priest/Scott/Tucker) 4.36
05. Block-Buster! (previously unreleased outtake from 1972) (Chinn/Chapman) 3.13
06. Laura Lee (previously unreleased ‘Off The Road’ version from 1977) (Connolly/Priest/Scott/Tucker) 6.42
07. Be With You Soon (previously unreleased track recorded 1972) (Connolly/Priest/Scott/Tucker) 3.31
08. Done Me Wrong Alright (previously unreleased BBC session from 1971) (Connolly/Priest/Scott/Tucker) 2.41
09. Ballroom Blitz (previously unreleased outtake from 1973) (Chinn/Chapman) 3.58
10. Rebel Rouser (previously unreleased ‘Funny Adams’ outtake from 1974) (Connolly/Priest/Scott/Tucker) 3.32
11. 4th Of July (previously unreleased ‘Give Us A Wink’ version) (Connolly/Priest/Scott/Tucker) 3.46
12. Need A Lot Of Lovin’ (previously unreleased BBC session from 1973) (Connolly/Priest/Scott/Tucker) 2.58
13. Action (previously unreleased ‘Give Us A Wink’ version from 1977) (Connolly/Priest/Scott/Tucker) 3.25
14. Love Is Like Oxygen (extended instrumental version) (Scott/Griffin) 6.58

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On the road …

I´ll stay in Dortmund/Germany for a few days:

Dortmund  is an independent city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is in the middle part of the state and is considered to be the administrative, commercial and cultural centre of the eastern Ruhr area. Its population of 581,612 (2015) makes it the 8th largest city in Germany. Moreover, Dortmund is the largest city by area and population in the Ruhr Area, an urban area with some 5.1 million (2011) inhabitants which is the largest urban agglomeration in Germany. (by wikipedia)

Dortmund

I´ll be back on next monday and will continue with this blog.

I wish all readers of this blog a very good time !

Savoy Brown – Blue Matter (1969)

FrontCover1Blue Matter is the third album by the band Savoy Brown. Teaming up once again with producer Mike Vernon, it finds them experimenting even more within the blues framework. Several tracks feature piano (played by Bob Hall, guitarist Kim Simmonds, and vocalist Chris Youlden, who even plays guitar here) as well as trombone.
This album featured a mix of live and studio recordings. The live tracks were recorded on December 6, 1968 at the now defunct City of Leicester College of Education because the band was scheduled to tour the USA and needed additional tracks to complete the album in time for the tour. The booking at the college represented their only chance to record the extra tracks in a live venue before embarking on the tour. An offer to perform the concert free of charge was accepted by Chris Green, the college Social Secretary, who had made the original booking, and the concert was duly recorded, a number of the live tracks being added to the album.
Because Chris Youlden was suffering from tonsillitis, Dave Peverett stood in as lead vocalist on the live tracks.
The album track “Vicksburg Blues” had first appeared as the B-side of Decca single F 12797 (released June 1968), fronted by “Walking by Myself”. (by wikipedia)
The third release by Kim Simmonds and company, but the first to feature the most memorable lineup of the group: Simmonds, “Lonesome” Dave Peverett, Tony “Tone” Stevens, Roger Earl, and charismatic singer Chris Youlden. This one serves up a nice mixture of blues covers and originals, with the first side devoted to studio cuts and the second a live club date recording. Certainly the standout track, indeed a signature song by the band, is the tour de force “Train to Nowhere,” with its patient, insistent buildup and pounding train-whistle climax. Additionally, David Anstey’s detailed, imaginative sleeve art further boosts this a notch above most other British blues efforts.(by Peter Kurtz)

Side One is marked “Studio”; Side Two is marked “Live” and was recorded at The City of Leicester College of Education, Friday 6th December 1968.

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Savoy Brown, live in 1969
Personnel:
Roger Earl (drums, percussion)
Bob Hall (piano)
“Lonesome” Dave Peverett (guitar, vocals)
Kim Simmonds (guitar, harmonica, piano)
Tone Stevens (bass)
Chris Youlden (vocals, guitar, piano)
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Rivers Jobe (bass on 01., 02. + 04.)
Mike Vernon (percussion on 01.)
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trombones on 01:
Terry Flannery – Keith Martin – Alan Moore – Brian Perrin – Derek Wadsworth

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Tracklist:
01. Train To Nowhere (Simmonds/Youlden) 4.12
02. Tolling Bells (Simmonds/Youlden) 6.33
03. She’s Got A Ring In His Nose And A Ring On Her Hand (Youlden) 3.07
04. Vicksburg Blues (Hall/Youlden) 4.00
05. Don’t Turn Me From Your Door (Hooker) 5.4
06. Grits Ain’t Groceries (All Around Te World) (bonus track) (Turner) 2.46
07. May Be Wrong (Peverett) 7.56

08. Louisiana Blues (Morganfield) 9.05
09. It Hurts Me Too (London) 6.51
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Alternate frontcover from Australia

The Whistlebinkies – The Whistlebinkies 2 (1980)

FrontCover1For more than 45 years the Whistlebinkies have maintained one of the most distinctive sounds in the Scottish folk revival, their essential musical core of “rantin’ pipe and tremblin’ string”, along with clarsach, concertina and side drum winning over audiences throughout Scotland and Europe and as far flung as Memphis and Beijing.

The band pioneered the effective use of revived bellows-blown Lowland pipes, have consistently pursued a democratic group approach to their all-acoustic arrangements and frequently and successfully bridge the divide between Scottish traditional and “art” music, in collaboration with such institutions as the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, the Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Cappella Nova and such revered figures as classical violinist Yehudi Menuhin and avant-garde music luminary John Cage. They were also the first Scottish folk ensemble ever to play in China, in November 1991.
They were the first group to bring the pipes, clarsach and fiddle into regular performance, a combination that seems commonplace now. They continue to use only acoustic traditional instruments and prefer to play in a good natural acoustic without amplification. (by projects.handsupfortrad.scot)

“Following their highly acclaimed first album, this outing shows a wealth of excellencein the Whistlebinkies approach to the traditional idiom. Combining bothoriginal and traditional material with a skillful approach to arrangement, the whole excercise is a convincing example of what can and should be done in this field.” (by David Etheridge, Melody Maker 18 October 1980)

The album was No 1 in the Melody Maker folk music chart on 18 October 1980 and No 2 on 8 November 1980.

 

The Whistlebinkies are the Scopttish Version of “The Dubliners” … and one of the finest bands in  Scottish folk Music.

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The Whistlebinkies, 1982

Personnel:
Peter Anderson (scottish drums)
Mick Broderick (drums, vocals)
Rhona Mac Kay (harp, vocals)
Eddie McGuire (flute)
Bob Nelson (fiddle)
Rab Wallace (pipe)

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Tracklist:
01  Waukin’ O’ The Fauld (McGuire) 3.34
02. The Bonnie Moorhen (Traditional) 4.00
03. The Pipe Strathspey And Reel (Traditional)  3:50
04. The Fiddle Strathspey And Reel (Traditional) 2.19
05. Phiuthrag’sa Phiuthar (Sister O Sister) (Traditional) 3.09
06. Broderick’s Bodhran (Wallace) 3.09
07. Great Is The Cause Of My Sorrow (Traditional) 3.53
08. The Pipe March (Traditional) 3.39
09. Gealach Nan Eilean (Island Moon) (Traditional) 2.16
10. The Fossil Grove (Traditional) 3.44
11. Freedom Come All Ye (Henderson) 4.37

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The Whistlebinkies today

Don Nix – In God We Trust (1971)

FrontCover1A native of Memphis, Tennessee, Nix’s musical career began back at the beginning of Stax Records. He was a member of the young record label’s house band The Mar-Keys, where he played sax. The band had a hit in 1961 with the instrumental “Last Night”, and they went on to tour extensively as well as providing studio backing for a host of Stax artists. They later broke up, members going on to form off-shoot groups The Memphis Horns and Booker T & The MGs. Nix himself went on to befriend Leon Russell, and started work behind the scenes as a producer and songwriter. One of his most notable compositions was “Goin’ Down”, first recorded by Freddie King in 1971, which has since become a blues standard. He also worked with George Harrison on the Concerts For Bangladesh, and produced an album for Albert King (1971’s Lovejoy, on Stax).
He released his first solo album the same year, on Leon Russell’s Shelter Records label. In God We Trust was a fantastic album, a rootsy blend of rock, R&B and gospel. It was recorded at Muscle Shoals, with backing provided by their house band of Barry Beckett (keyboards), Eddie Hinton (guitar), David Hood (bass) and Roger Hawkins (drums). Mostly made up of original songs (many with strong Christian themes to the lyrics), it also featured versions of the traditional spirituals “Will The Circle Be Unbroken” and “I’ll Fly Away”. Another song (“He Never Lived A Day Without Jesus”) was co-written with Bobby Whitlock, who also featured it on his own solo debut a year later.
Somewhere around this time Nix apparently befriended Furry Lewis, the old one-legged bluesman who originally recorded in the 1920s and had recently returned to popularity through the folk revival. Lewis appears in a bizarre guest spot, one short track consisting of just him talking followed by a quick bit of slide guitar. He would later go on tour with Nix. (by stuckinthepast08.blogspot)

What a great debut Album … full of souful gospel songs ! Don Nix was much more as his classic “Goin Down” !

Don Nix was one of the most underrated musiscian of all time !

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Personnel:
Barry Beckett (keyboards)
Roger Hawkins (drums)
Eddie Hinton (guitar)
David Hood (bass)
Furry Lewis (slide guitar)
Don Nix (vocals)
Larry Raspberry (guitar)
J,A, Spell (fiddle)

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Tracklist:
01  In God We Trust (Nix) 4.25
02. Golden Mansions (Nix) 4.04
03. I’ll Fly Away (Traditional) 3.26
04. He Never Lived A Day Without Jesus (Whitlock/Nix) 4.02
05. Nero My God To Thee (Traditional) 1.04
06. Amos Burke  (Nix) 2.57
07. Long Way To Nowhere (Nix/Raspberry) 3.32
08. Iuka  (Nix) 5,15
09. Will The Circle Be Unbroken (Traditional) 3.54
10. I’ve Tried (Truckers Lament) (Nix) 1.28

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Various Artists – Smoky Mountain Ballads (1976)

FrontCover1Let´s take a look to the roots of American Music.

In 1941. Smoky Mountain Ballads, a set of 78s selected and annotated with autobiographical notes by John A. Lomax, is published by RCA Victor. The album includes the Carter Family, Uncle Dave Macon, and the Monroe Brothers singing such songs as “East Virginia Blues,” “Worried Man Blues,” “Down in the Willow Garden,” and “Darling Corey,” which later became staples of the folk revival repertoire.

And we will hear Ballads from the Smoky Mountains:

The Great Smoky Mountains are a mountain range rising along the Tennessee–North Carolina border in the southeastern United States. They are a subrange of the Appalachian Mountains, and form part of the Blue Ridge Physiographic Province. The range is sometimes called the Smoky Mountains and the name is commonly shortened to the Smokies. The Great Smokies are best known as the home of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which protects most of the range. The park was established in 1934, and, with over 9 million visits per year, it is the most-visited national park in the United States.

The Great Smokies are part of an International Biosphere Reserve. The range is home to an estimated 187,000 acres (76,000 ha) of old growth forest, constituting the largest such stand east of the Mississippi River. The cove hardwood forests in the range’s lower elevations are among the most diverse ecosystems in North America, and the Southern Appalachian spruce-fir forest that coats the range’s upper elevations is the largest of its kind. The Great Smokies are also home to the densest black bear population in the Eastern United States and the most diverse salamander population outside of the tropics.[

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Along with the Biosphere reserve, the Great Smokies have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The U.S. National Park Service preserves and maintains 78 structures within the national park that were once part of the numerous small Appalachian communities scattered throughout the range’s river valleys and coves. The park contains five historic districts and nine individual listings on the National Register of Historic Places.

The name “Smoky” comes from the natural fog that often hangs over the range and presents as large smoke plumes from a distance. This fog is caused by the vegetation exhaling volatile organic compounds, chemicals that have a high vapor pressure and easily form vapors at normal temperature and pressure.
As a result of the 2016 Great Smoky Mountains wildfires, the Great Smoky Mountains have received international media coverage. (by wikipedia)

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Ballads from Smoky Mountains means Country,  Folk and Bluesgrass.songs.

And I´m impressed by the music, because the Music still sounds fresh and vital.

Listen to Chittlin’ Cookin’ Time In Cheatham County  … this could be a Ray Davies tune from the Sixties !

This is a very nice little collection of old Hillbilly folk tunes. Sounds like they are just recordings of old 78’s, but sound quality is as good as can be expected. (SchizoMelodies)

 

These recordings were originally released by RCA Victor in 1964 und a few Songs from this LP were re-released by Pickwick Records in 1976 …

Let´s discover this old fashioned music …

UncleDaveMaconUncle Dave Macon

Tracklist:
01. Uncle Dave Macon:  Cumberland Mountain Deer Race (Harris) 2.49
02. Wade Mainer, Zeke Morris & Steve Ledford: Riding On That Train Fourty-Five (Morris) 2.33
03. Dixon Bros.: Down With The Old Canoe (D.Dixon/H.Dixon) 2.51
04. Arthur Smith Trio: Chittlin’ Cookin’ Time In Cheatham County  (Arthur Smith Trio) 2.32
05. Monroe Bros.:  Where Is My Sailor Boy? (C.Monroe) 2.43
06. Carter Family:  Worried Man Blues (A.P.Carter) 2.46
07. J.E. Mainer’s Mountaineers:  On A Cold Winter Night (Mainer) 3.00
08. Uncle Dave Macon:  Railroadin’ And Gamblin’ (Macon) 2.39
09. Gid Tanner And His Skillet Lickers: Ida Red (unknown) 2.51

 

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Chuck Berry – After School Session (1957)

FrontCover1Chuck Berry, who with his indelible guitar licks, brash self-confidence and memorable songs about cars, girls and wild dance parties did as much as anyone to define rock ’n’ roll’s potential and attitude in its early years, died on Saturday. He was 90.

The St. Charles County Police Department in Missouri confirmed his death on its Facebook page. The department said it responded to a medical emergency at a home and he was declared dead after lifesaving measures were unsuccessful.
While Elvis Presley was rock’s first pop star and teenage heartthrob, Mr. Berry was its master theorist and conceptual genius, the songwriter who understood what the kids wanted before they did themselves. With songs like “Johnny B. Goode” and “Roll Over Beethoven,” he gave his listeners more than they knew they were getting from jukebox entertainment.
His guitar lines wired the lean twang of country and the bite of the blues into phrases with both a streamlined trajectory and a long memory. And tucked into the lighthearted, telegraphic narratives that he sang with such clear enunciation was a sly defiance, upending convention to claim the pleasures of the moment.
In “Sweet Little Sixteen,” “You Can’t Catch Me” and other songs, Mr. Berry invented rock as a music of teenage wishes fulfilled and good times (even with cops in pursuit). In “Promised Land,” “Too Much Monkey Business” and “Brown Eyed Handsome Man,” he celebrated and satirized America’s opportunities and class tensions. His rock ’n’ roll was a music of joyful lusts, laughed-off tensions and gleefully shattered icons. (by Jon Parles, The New York Times)
ChuckBerry4Chuck Berry’s music has transcended generations. He earns respect to this day because he is truly an entertainer. Berry, also known as “The Father of Rock & Roll,” gained success by watching the audience’s reaction and playing accordingly, putting his listeners’ amusement above all else. For this reason, tunes like “Johnny B. Goode,” “Maybellene” and “Memphis” have become anthems to an integrated American youth and popular culture. Berry is a musical icon who established rock and roll as a musical form and brought the worlds of black and white together in song.
Born in St. Louis on October 18, 1926 Berry had many influences on his life that shaped his musical style. He emulated the smooth vocal clarity of his idol, Nat King Cole, while playing blues songs from bands like Muddy Waters. For his first stage performance, Berry chose to sing a Jay McShann song called “Confessin’ the Blues.” It was at his high school’s student musical performance, when the blues was well-liked but not considered appropriate for such an event. He got a thunderous applause for his daring choice, and from then on, Berry had to be onstage.

Berry took up the guitar after that, inspired by his partner in the school production. He found that if he learned rhythm changes and blues chords, he could play most of the popular songs on the radio at the time. His friend, Ira Harris, showed him techniques on the guitar that would become the foundation of Berry’s original sound. Then in 1952, he began playing guitar and singing in a club band whose song list ranged from blues to ballads to calypso to country. Berry was becoming an accomplished showman, incorporating gestures and facial expressions to go with the lyrics.
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It was in 1953 that Chuck Berry joined the Sir John’s Trio (eventually renamed the Chuck Berry Combo), which played the popular Cosmopolitan Club in St. Louis. Country-western music was big at the time, so Berry decided to use some of the riffs and create his own unique hillbilly sound. The black audience thought he was crazy at first, but couldn’t resist trying to dance along with it. Since country was popular with white people, they began to come to the shows, and the audience was at some points almost 40 percent white. Berry’s stage show antics were getting attention, but the other band members did their parts as well. In his own words: “I would slur my strings to make a passage that Johnnie (Johnson) could not produce with piano keys but the answer would be so close that he would get a tremendous ovation. His answer would sound similar to some that Jerry Lee Lewis’s fingers later began to flay.”

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Later in 1955, Berry went on a road trip to Chicago, where he chanced upon a club where his idol, Muddy Waters, was performing. He arrived late and only heard the last song, but when it was over he got the attention of Waters and asked him who to see about making a record. Waters replied, “Yeah, Leonard Chess. Yeah, Chess Records over on Forty-seventh and Cottage.” Berry went there on Monday and discovered it was a blues label where greats like Howlin’ Wolf and Bo Diddley recorded. He didn’t have any tapes to show, but Chess was willing to listen if he brought some back from St. Louis. So Berry went home and recorded some originals, including the would-be “Maybellene,” then called “Ida May,” and drove back to Chicago later that week to audition. Much to Berry’s surprise, it was that hillbilly number that caught Chess’ attention. Berry was signed to Chess Records and in the summer of 1955, “Maybellene” reached #5 on the Pop Charts and #1 on the R&B Charts. Through Chuck Berry, Chess Records moved from the R&B genre into the mainstream and Berry himself was on his way to stardom.

ChuckBerry3Berry continued his success with such hits as “Brown-Eyed Man,” “Too Much Monkey Business,” “Memphis,” “Roll Over, Beethoven!” and “Johnny B. Goode.” “Johnny B. Goode” is Berry’s masterpiece, as it brought together all the elements of Berry’s unique musical sound. It cemented his place in rock history and led to fame in the 1950s. His popularity garnered him television and movie appearances and he toured frequently.
Berry’s incredible success is due to his ability to articulate the concerns and attitudes of his audience in his music. At the height of his success, Berry was a 30-year-old black man singing to a mostly white, teenage audience. Dubbed the “Eternal Teenager,” Chuck Berry’s knowledge of the pop market made it possible for him to break color barriers and play to an integrated audience.
In the 1960s and 1970s, Berry’s music was the inspiration for such groups as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. Berry had a number of comeback recordings and in 1972 had the first and only #1 Pop Chart hit of his career with “My Ding-A-Ling. 1986 fittingly saw him inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as the very first inductee in history. As a tribute to his pervasiveness in the realm of rock, a clip of “Johnny B. Goode” was chosen played in the Voyager I spacecraft, proving Chuck Berry and his rock legacy are truly out of this world. (taken from his Website)
After School Session is Chuck Berry’s debut album, released in May 1957 (see 1957 in music) by Chess Records as LP 1426. It was the second LP record released by Chess.
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The first song on the original version of After School Session to be released was “Wee Wee Hours”, the B-side of “Maybellene”, issued in July 1955. It peaked at number 10 on Billboard magazine’s R&B Singles chart. The next song to be released was “Together We Will Always Be”, the B-side of “Thirty Days”, in September 1955. The next two songs released were “No Money Down” backed with “Down Bound Train”, in December 1955, the former peaking at number 8 on the R&B Singles chart. In May 1956, “Drifting Heart” was released as the B-side of “Roll Over Beethoven”. Berry’s next single, “Too Much Monkey Business” backed with “Brown Eyed Handsome Man”, was released in September 1956; these songs reached number 4 and number 5 on the R&B Singles chart, respectively. “Havana Moon”, the B-side of “You Can’t Catch Me”, was released in November 1956. The last single from the album to be released was “School Day (Ring Ring Goes the Bell)” backed with “Deep Feeling”, in March 1957, with the former reaching number 1 on the R&B Singles chart and number 3 on the Hot 100.

The songs on After School Session were taken from Berry’s first five sessions for Leonard and Phil Chess. “Wee Wee Hours” was the first to be recorded, on May 21, 1955. “Together (We’ll Always Be)” was recorded in September 1955. At the next session, on December 20, 1955, Berry recorded “Roly Poly” (also known as “Rolli Polli”), “No Money Down”, “Berry Pickin'”, and “Down Bound Train”. The third session was on April 16, 1956, when he recorded “Too Much Monkey Business”, “Brown Eyed Handsome Man”, and “Drifting Heart”. “Havana Moon” was recorded on October 29, 1956. The last session took place on January 21, 1957, when he recorded “School Days” and “Deep Feeling”.(by wikipedia)
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Chuck Berry’s debut LP (60 years old !!!) is fairly strong musically, as well as having a really cool cover (a still shot of Berry, guitar slung in front of him, from the movie Rock, Rock, Rock!). After School Session was just the second long-player ever issued by Chess — only the soundtrack to the movie Rock, Rock, Rock! preceded it. This May 1957 release made Berry something of a late-bloomer among rock & roll’s foundation performers — he’d had his first recording session two years earlier, in May of 1955, and by the spring of 1957, Bill Haley already had a handful of LPs to his credit, Elvis Presley was gaining on him, and Clyde McPhatter’s version of the Drifters was represented on album, with numerous others soon to join their ranks. Berry had actually enjoyed only two major pop (i.e. rock as opposed to R&B) chart hits at the time: “Maybellene” in the summer of 1955, and “Roll Over Beethoven,” which had just made the Top 30 in the summer of 1956. It was “School Day,” the lead-off track here, that heralded his successful 18-month assault on the Top 40, opening a string of hits that included “Rock and Roll Music,” “Sweet Little Sixteen,” “Johnny B. Goode,” and “Carol,” and resulted in the release of After School Session — the title offers curious multiple meanings, incidentally, intended to attract Berry’s teen audience in the most innocent of terms (in connection with the rock & roll cuts), but also subtly invoking more daring “extra-curricular” activity in its blues and ballads, and older, post-teen concerns.
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In those days, as a policy, Chess’ rock & roll and blues LPs were comprised of previously existing single sides, and, thus, beyond the current single, the songs leap wildly across different sounds and styles — impromptu blues (“Deep Feeling”), and dance (“Roly Poly,” “Berry Pickin'”), instrumentals are interspersed with a trio of rock & roll jewels, “Too Much Monkey Business” and “No Money Down,” with their accents on the joys and textures of teenage life, which somehow didn’t catch on among mainstream listeners as singles, and the piercing, provocative “Brown Eyed Handsome Man,” which showed how easily Berry could broach sensitive or provocative material if it were masked by a hot enough beat and loud enough guitar, bass, and drums; and we take detours into blues (“Wee Wee Hours,” “Downbound Train”), ballads (“Together (We’ll Always Be),” “Drifting Heart”), and even calypso music (“Havana Moon”). All of it was recorded in four separate sessions spread across almost two years; the rock & roll numbers and the guitar-driven instrumentals out-class most of the blues and ballads, but there’s nothing here that could be classed as “filler,” either — a lot of British Invasion bands wore out copies of these same sides learning their basic repertory, and domestic roots rockers could have done worse than to listen to “Downbound Train” or “No Money Down.” (by Bruce Eder)
Chuck Berry Portrait
Personnel:
Fred Below (drums)
Chuck Berry (guitar, vocals, steel guitar on 02.)
Willie Dixon (bass)
Ebby Hardy (drums)
Johnnie Johnson (piano)
Jimmy Rogers (guitar)
Otis Spann (piano)
Jasper Thomas (drums)
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L. C. Davis (saxophone on 03. + 12.)
Jerome Green maracas  on 15.)
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Tracklist:
01. School Days 2,43
02. Deep Feeling 2.21
03. Too Much Monkey Business 2,56
04. Wee Wee Hours 3.05
05. Roly Poly (aka Rolli Polli) 2.51
06. No Money Down 2.59
07. Brown Eyed Handsome Man 2.19
08. Berry Pickin’ 2.33
09. Together (We Will Always Be) 2.39
10. Havana Moon 3.09
11. Downbound Train 2.51
12. Drifting Heart”  2:50
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13. You Can’t Catch Me 2.44
14. Thirty Days (To Come Back Home) 2.25
15, Maybellene 2.19

All songs written by Chuck Berry.

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R.I.P.:
Charles Edward Anderson “Chuck” Berry (October 18, 1926 – March 18, 2017)
We all had to thank !